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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
  • The selection of news is made by the team of myScience.ch. There is no right to be published or automatic publishing.
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Results 61 - 80 of 293.


Pharmacology - Health - 05.07.2022
Molecule boosts fat burning
Molecule boosts fat burning
Study identifies a new signaling molecule that increases the energy consumption of brown fat cells A study led by the University of Bonn and the University Hospital Bonn has identified a molecule - the purine inosine - that boosts fat burning in brown adipocytes. The mechanism was discovered in mice, but probably exists in humans as well: If a transporter for inosine is less active, the mice remain significantly leaner despite a high-fat diet.

Physics - 04.07.2022
The Higgs particle turns ten
The Higgs particle turns ten
Detailed insights into the nature of the Higgs boson could help answer big open questions in physics Exactly ten years ago, the Atlas and CMS experiments announced a resounding success: Little less than three years after the launch of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern, the last missing piece in the Standard Model of particle physics had been found: The Higgs boson, a kind of messenger of the Higgs field that in turn gives mass to all matter particles.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 04.07.2022
On the way to cell-type materials
On the way to cell-type materials
Molecular machines control a sizeable number of fundamental processes in nature. Embedded in a cellular environment, these processes play a central role in the intracellular and intercellular transportation of molecules, as well as in muscle contraction in humans and animals. In order for the entire organism to function, a well-defined orientation and arrangement of the molecular machines is essential.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.07.2022
Lung cancer: When radiation does not work
Lung cancer: When radiation does not work
Some lung tumors do not respond to radiation therapy. This effect can be reversed by blocking an enzyme in the tumor cells, as a Würzburg research team reports. Lung cancer is the most common cancer in the world, with 2.2 million new cases and around 1.8 million deaths in 2020 alone. While knowledge about the disease has improved considerably and new therapeutic strategies can prolong the lives of previously incurable patients, the figures clearly show that the mortality rate is still far too high.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.07.2022
A step on the way to better therapies against viruses
A step on the way to better therapies against viruses
Researchers from the MHH and RESIST show how a cell protein of the innate immune response prevents the multiplication of herpes viruses Most body cells can defend themselves against viruses after they have been activated by the body's own messenger substances (interferons). This happens with the help of proteins that recognise invading virus components and interfere with virus replication.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 30.06.2022
Life in the earth's interior as productive as in some ocean waters
Life in the earth’s interior as productive as in some ocean waters
Microorganisms in aquifers deep below the earth's surface produce similar amounts of biomass as those in some marine waters. This is the finding of researchers led by the Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), both Germany. Applying a unique, ultra-sensitive measurement method using radioactive carbon, they were able to demonstrate for the first time that these biotic communities in absolute darkness do not depend on sunlight.

Health - 29.06.2022
Smoking promotes development of severe pulmonary hypertension
Smoking promotes development of severe pulmonary hypertension
Analysis of registry data leads MHH researchers to new insights into certain forms of the disease About one percent of the world's adult population suffers from pulmonary hypertension (PH). There are many forms of this disease. One of them is idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). This is a rare but very severe form of pulmonary hypertension.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 29.06.2022
Shining some light on the obscure proteome
Shining some light on the obscure proteome
Mass-spectrometry based proteomics is the big-data science of proteins that allows to monitor the abundances of thousands of proteins in a sample at once. It is therefore a particularly well suited readout to discover which proteins are targeted by any small molecule. An international research team has investigated this using chemical proteomics.

Health - Psychology - 29.06.2022
New app helps Syrian refugees deal with post-traumatic stress
New app helps Syrian refugees deal with post-traumatic stress
Researchers at Leipzig University have partnered with Syrian refugees and an agency for e-mental health services to develop and scientifically test an app to help users deal with post-traumatic stress and related mental strain. The app - Sanadak - has now been published in Arabic and German and can be downloaded free of charge.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded
Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded
Binge eating bye bye: Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded A group of researchers has found a completely new approach to treating eating disorders. The scientists have demonstrated that a group of nerve cells in the hypothalamus (known as AgRP, agouti-related peptide neurons) control the release of endogenous lysophospholipids, which in turn control the excitability of nerve cells in the cerebral cortex, stimulating food intake.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 28.06.2022
A sanitizer in the galactic centre region
A sanitizer in the galactic centre region
Many of us have probably already - literally - handled the chemical compound iso-propanol: it can used as an antiseptic, a solvent or a cleaning agent. But this substance is not only found on Earth: researchers led by Arnaud Belloche from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn have now detected the molecule in interstellar space for the first time.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2022
Tracking down the causes of rare diseases in children
Tracking down the causes of rare diseases in children
The causes of intelligence impairment or epilepsy remain unexplained in more than 50 per cent of cases. Together with international colleagues, researchers at Leipzig University Hospital have discovered two genes with mutations that cause neurodevelopmental disorders in children. Their findings have now been published in scientific journals.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.06.2022
Mass spectrometry-based draft of the mouse proteome
Mass spectrometry-based draft of the mouse proteome
Proteins control and organize almost every aspect of life. The totality of all proteins in a living organism, a tissue or a cell is called the proteome. Using mass spectrometry, researchers at the TUM School of Life Sciences characterize the proteome, or protein complement of the genome, in important model organisms.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 24.06.2022
Defects in quartz crystal structure reveal the origin of dust
Defects in quartz crystal structure reveal the origin of dust
Global warming and a progressively drier climate in many parts of the world are causing more dust storms. To predict how these storms are caused, researchers are looking into the past to understand where the dust came from, for how long, and over what distances it was transported. An international research team led by Dr. Aditi K. Dave and Professor Kathryn Fitzsimmons from the Department of Geosciences at the University of Tübingen, along with colleagues from Romania, Brazil, Kazakhstan and Tajikistan, have now developed a new method of doing this.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.06.2022
Importance of Selenium in the Opening Stages of Protein Synthesis
An international team of researchers with members from Freie Universität Berlin has made an important contribution to our understanding of the essential trace element selenium. The team was able to demonstrate how selenocysteine is incorporated into the proteins of eukaryotes. Using a specialized cryo-electron microscope, the researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA, and the University of Illinois, Chicago, USA, succeeded in visualizing the first steps in selenoprotein synthesis.

Physics - 23.06.2022
Long-sought tetra-neutron discovered
Long-sought tetra-neutron discovered
After 60 years of unsuccessful searches, an international research team has discovered a neutral nucleus for the first time - the tetra-neutron. The collaboration succeeded in creating an isolated four-neutron system with low relative kinetic energy in a volume equivalent to an atomic nucleus. The building blocks of atomic nuclei are the nucleons, which come in two types, the neutral neutrons and the positively charged protons - the two so-called isospin states of the nucleon.

Environment - Economics / Business - 23.06.2022
Default options facilitate faster carbon offsetting in air travel
Study with participation of University of Cologne economist finds that many air travellers more readily choose faster, but more expensive carbon offsetting options online if selecting a slower option requires action. However, the readiness to do so decreases the greater the gap between the most and the least expensive option gets / publication in 'Nature Human Behaviour' The defaults on a carbon offsetting website can cause a large percentage of customers to select faster CO2 compensation, even if this entails higher costs.

Life Sciences - 23.06.2022
Silence for thought
Silence for thought
Scientists map prominent differences in the neural circuits of mice, monkeys, and human The analysis of the human brain is a central goal of neuroscience. However, for methodological reasons, research has largely focused on model organisms, in particular the mouse. Now, neuroscientists gained novel insights on human neural circuitry using tissue obtained from neurosurgical interventions.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.06.2022
Research with a bite
Research with a bite
Scientists at the University of Bonn present a sensor system that can measure the bite force of insects How hard can insects bite? Having a strong chewing apparatus makes it easier to crush harder food and to succeed in fights with enemies. Biologists at the University of Bonn now present a mobile system (forceX) for measuring the bite forces of small animals, along with the software forceR to evaluate the data.

History / Archeology - 22.06.2022
Britains earliest humans
Britains earliest humans
Homo heidelbergensis may have occupied southern Britain between 560,000 and 620,000 years ago Archaeological discoveries made on the outskirts of Canterbury, Kent (England) confirm the presence of early humans in southern Britain between 560,000 and 620,000 years ago. The breakthrough, involving controlled excavations and radiometric dating, comes a century after stone tool artefacts were first uncovered at the site.