News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
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Results 61 - 80 of 97.


Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 03.04.2019
Novel nanophotonic chips for encrypted data transfer: Quantum communication
Novel nanophotonic chips for encrypted data transfer: Quantum communication
A giant cylindrical refrigerator, an electron-beam pattern generator, a cleanroom, etching equipment. Sometimes it takes a lot of big things to make something very small. The nanoscientists at the University of Münster headed by Prof. Wolfram Pernice and Prof. Carsten Schuck know this only too well: they use these and other devices to produce nanophotonic chips the size of a one-cent piece.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.04.2019
Unit approved
A new international research group aims to develop new approaches to prevent and treat cytomegalovirus infection. Lars Dölken, a virology expert from Würzburg, is the research unit's spokesman. "Cytomegalovirus, beware of this new research group!" This could be the motto of a new research unit recently approved by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

Life Sciences - 01.04.2019
Traffic Jam In The Cell: How Are Proteins Assigned To Specific Transporters?
Traffic Jam In The Cell: How Are Proteins Assigned To Specific Transporters?
A fundamental cellular mechanism ensures that proteins are transported to the places they are needed in the cells. So-called vesicles are responsible for that transport. Determining their composition has been difficult up to now, not least because of their short life span. By combining innovative investigative techniques, biochemists at Heidelberg University have succeeded in analysing two of these transport vesicles - the COPI and COPII vesicles - comprehensively for the first time.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.04.2019
"Don’t worry! We have the viruses under control": Series: ’Under wraps at the University of Münster’
Stephan Ludwig puzzles over a host of questions. There is nothing unusual about that when someone has a passion for science. As a molecular biologist, however, Professor Ludwig is particularly interested in one specific question which is of paramount importance: How do viruses - ‘these tiny little mites', as he calls them - succeed in remodelling a somatic cell in such a way that they can reproduce inside it, making the host organism sick or even killing it? “We still know very little about the interaction between the pathogen, the cell, and the host organism.

Astronomy / Space Science - 29.03.2019
Cassini mission reveals the secrets of Saturn’s walnut-shaped ring moons
New study in in the high-ranking journal Science No 73/2019 from Mar 29, 2019 A new study of Saturn's small inner moons was published in the high-ranking journal Science . Images of Pan, Daphnis, Atlas, Pandora and Epimetheus, obtained by the Cassini spacecraft in winter 2016/17, show that several of these so-called "shepherd moons" exhibit huge ridges around their equators, giving them a very peculiar and impressing walnut-like shape (Fig.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.03.2019
A cellular protein as a
A cellular protein as a "Gas Pump Attendant" of Cancer Development
03/29/2019 Scientists at the University of Würzburg have discovered a new mechanism of gene transcription in tumor cells. Their study identifies novel strategies to develop innovative anti-Cancer drugs. The cells which make up our body vary significantly. A liver cell does not look like a muscle cell and each has a unique function.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.03.2019
Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in Global Change
Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in Global Change
03/28/2019 Land use in tropical mountain regions leads to considerable changes of biodiversity and ecological functions. The intensity of such changes is greatly affected by the climate. 2019 marks the 250 th anniversary of Alexander von Humboldt. He was one of the first naturalists to document the distribution and adaptation of species on tropical mountains in the 19 th century.

Religions - History / Archeology - 27.03.2019
Voices from Beyond
Voices from Beyond
The voice is a fleeting medium. As the primary means of human communication, it also plays an important role in religion. And yet it is difficult to grasp and seems to elude discussion. But a research project at the Cluster of Excellence has nonetheless approached the voice in a religious context: scholars from various disciplines have studied the voice as a medium of religious communication, and have discovered in historical testimonies, as well as in literature and artwork from various religions and cultures from antiquity to the present day, what can be called "voices from beyond".

Physics - Chemistry - 27.03.2019
Toxic and aggressive, but widely used
Toxic and aggressive, but widely used
In toothpaste, Teflon, LEDs and medications, it shows its sunny side - but elemental fluorine is extremely aggressive and highly toxic. Attempts to determine the crystal structure of solid fluorine using X-rays ended with explosions 50 years ago. A research team has now clarified the actual structure of the fluorine using neutrons from the Heinz Maier Leibnitz Research Neutron Source (FRM II).

Life Sciences - 26.03.2019
Looking into the fly's brain
Looking into the fly’s brain
They take up little space and are easy to breed; because they are easy to look after, fruit flies or Drosophila melanogaster are used as laboratory animals in research institutes all over the world. However, that is not the only reason why they are one of the most important model organisms that are studied by geneticists.

Life Sciences - 26.03.2019
Duckweed: The low-down on a tiny plant
Duckweed: The low-down on a tiny plant
Duckweeds - for many aquatic animals like ducks and snails, a treat, but for pond owners, sometimes a thorn in the side. The tiny and fast-growing plants are of great interest to researchers, and not at least because of their industrial applications - for example, to purify wastewater or generate energy.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.03.2019
A new spin on nanophysics: Part 2 of the series
A new spin on nanophysics: Part 2 of the series "Under lock and key at Münster University"
Part 2 of the series "Under lock and key at Münster University": the vacuum machine at the Institute of Physics is used to investigate spin phenomena The yellow stickers can already be seen from a distance: "Laser beam", "High voltage - danger to life", "No unauthorized access". The locked door with the warning notices is located at the end of a long, dark corridor on the fourth floor of the Institute of Physics at the University of Münster.

Life Sciences - 25.03.2019
Hearing like a dinosaur
Hearing like a dinosaur
Alligators use neural maps to localize the source of a sound the same way birds do. The results of a new study strongly suggest that dinosaurs also used this strategy, offering an additional insight into evolutionary mechanisms. The ability to identify the direction to a source of sound is a matter of survival for most animals.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 22.03.2019
Inert Nitrogen Forced to React with Itself
Inert Nitrogen Forced to React with Itself
03/22/2019 Direct coupling of two molecules of nitrogen: chemists from Würzburg and Frankfurt have achieved what was thought to be impossible. This new reaction is reported and opens new possibilities for one of the most inert molecules on earth. Constituting over 78 % of the air we breathe, nitrogen is the element found the most often in its pure form on earth.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.03.2019
Memory like a Sieve - Or Not
Study by Research Team at Freie Universität Led by Biology Professor Stephan Sigrist on Conditions for Improving Memory Formation in Aging Humans No 063/2019 from Mar 21, 2019 Humans are not only capable of forming memories but also recalling these memories years later. However, with advancing age many of us face difficulties with forming new memories, a process usually referred to as age-induced memory impairment.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.03.2019
Discovery of a new heart muscle component
Discovery of a new heart muscle component
In order for the heart to work properly, it must exert muscular force. This involves the coordinated contraction of numerous sarcomeres, the smallest contractile units of heart muscle. Muscle contraction is brought about by the activity of conventional motor proteins, which pull on thin filaments to shorten sarcomeres.

Environment - 20.03.2019
Butterfly numbers down by two thirds
Butterfly numbers down by two thirds
Meadows adjacent to high-intensity agricultural areas are home to less than half the number of butterfly species than areas in nature preserves. The number of individuals is even down to one-third of that number. These are results of a research team led by Jan Christian Habel at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Thomas Schmitt at the Senckenberg Nature Research Society.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.03.2019
Protein BRCA1 as a Stress Coach
Protein BRCA1 as a Stress Coach
03/20/2019 Two proteins work hand in hand to ensure that the tumour cells of neuroblastoma can grow at full speed. In "Nature", a Würzburg research team shows how the proteins can do this. Anyone who has ever studied the molecular basis of breast cancer will probably have heard of the abbreviation BRCA1 - this is a protein that protects the cells of breast tissue against cancer.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 19.03.2019
Public-sector research boosts cleantech start-ups
Cleantech start-ups in the USA that cooperate with government research agencies outperform their competitors both in terms of patents and funding. That is the conclusion of a study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the University of Maryland and the University of Cambridge. In the cleantech sector, where development processes can extend over many years, public-private partnerships could prove valuable in other countries, too.

Materials Science - 19.03.2019
Deliberate Short Circuits and Nail Torture as a Means of Enhancing Security: Battery research
Deliberate Short Circuits and Nail Torture as a Means of Enhancing Security: Battery research
Most of the people who stroll across the Leonardo campus are unlikely to notice a narrow, single-storey building. The construction in question is about 25 metres long and five metres wide. It is adorned with red and white stripes, has a corrugated iron roof, and is surrounded by a wire mesh fence which is about 1.5 metres high.