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Astronomy / Space - 12.06.2024
Cosmic roulette
Cosmic roulette
Almost four billion light years away from Earth in the centre of the galaxy OJ287, two giant black holes orbit each other, which are approximately 18 billion and 150 million times more massive than our sun. The larger of the two black holes is surrounded by a vast accretion disk, a rotating disk of matter that flows towards the black hole at its centre.

Social Sciences - Career - 10.06.2024
Italian Moms Work far Fewer Years than Dads, while Finland Shows Equality
Italian Moms Work far Fewer Years than Dads, while Finland Shows Equality
Significant differences in the working lives of mothers and fathers in Italy - Finland, on the other hand, balanced A study by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research shows that, in contrast to Finland, from midlife mothers in Italy and the US work significantly fewer years than fathers, especially if they have two and more children.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.06.2024
How Human Derived RNA Fragments Help the Hepatitis E Virus
How Human Derived RNA Fragments Help the Hepatitis E Virus
If the virus incorporates host genetic segments into its genome, the infection may become chronic. Why does Hepatitis E become chronic in some patients, and why do medications not work? To find out, an international research team led by scientists from Bochum observed a patient with chronic Hepatitis E infection over a year.

Physics - Materials Science - 07.06.2024
Rodents inspire dentistry
Rodents inspire dentistry
Researchers discover an iron-containing material in the outer enamel of rodent teeth that could also make human teeth more resistant   Rodents such as beavers, nutrias (coypu) , squirrels and rats have particularly strong, elongated front teeth that grow continuously over the course of their lives. Using state-of-the-art imaging techniques, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart have now elucidated the tooth structure of various rodent species at the nanometre scale.

Physics - 07.06.2024
Perturbations simplify the study of 'super photons'
Perturbations simplify the study of ’super photons’
A study by the University of Bonn gives novel insight into properties which are often difficult to observe Thousands of particles of light can merge into a type of "super photon" under suitable conditions. Physicists call such a state a photon Bose-Einstein condensate. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now shown that this exotic quantum state obeys a fundamental theorem of physics.

Life Sciences - 07.06.2024
Dancers are less neurotic
Amateur and professional dancers are less neurotic than people who do not dance. A new study shows A study led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, has shown that both amateur and professional dancers are less neurotic than people who do not dance.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 07.06.2024
Second great ape species discovered at Hammerschmiede fossil site
Second great ape species discovered at Hammerschmiede fossil site
An international team of researchers has discovered a previously unknown ape species in the Hammerschmiede clay pit in southern Germany. Buronius manfredschmidi was found close to the great ape Danuvius guggenmosi , known as "Udo". This was about 12 million years ago the first ape with adaptations for walking upright and made the Hammerschmiede excavation site famous.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 06.06.2024
Searching for Signals from the Early Universe
In the search for signals from the early universe, the Heidelberg scientist Georg Wolschin deals with the question of whether and how residual spectral lines from the recombination phase with the formation of the first elements can be detected in the cosmic background radiation - which can be measured very precisely today.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 06.06.2024
How nature repurposes ammonium transporters as receptors
How nature repurposes ammonium transporters as receptors
Research team at the University of Freiburg identifies new membrane protein Sd-Amt1 A team led by Freiburg biochemist Susana Andrade has characterised a new membrane protein that allows microorganisms to repurpose ammonium transporters (Amts) as receptors. Ammonium transporters clearly distinguish between ammonium, potassium and water.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.06.2024
Key to Improving Cancer Treatments Discovered
Key to Improving Cancer Treatments Discovered
Some cancer drugs cause severe side effects because they are not working accurately enough. A team at the University of Würzburg led by biochemist Caroline Kisker has now discovered why. The small protein ubiquitin is involved in almost every cellular process in our body: it orchestrates the stability and function of the vast majority of proteins.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.06.2024
Restless legs syndrome: new approaches for treatment
Restless legs syndrome: new approaches for treatment
Largest genetic study on RLS to date An international team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Munich has conducted the largest genetic investigation of restless legs syndrome (RLS) to date. The study represents a significant advancement in deciphering the genetic basis of this disorder and opens novel pathways for patient care.

Health - 04.06.2024
Blood vessels are the pioneers of bone formation in the skull
Blood vessels are the pioneers of bone formation in the skull
Living bone is fascinating because of its unique ability to adapt to mechanical stress and regenerate without scarring. During fracture healing, blood vessels and bone cells work closely together to gradually replace the initial cartilaginous wound tissue with ingrowing blood vessels and new bone tissue.

History / Archeology - Religions - 04.06.2024
Earliest manuscript of Gospel about Jesus's childhood discovered
Earliest manuscript of Gospel about Jesus’s childhood discovered
Papyrologists decipher manuscript fragment and date it to the 4th to 5th century. For decades, a papyrus fragment with the inventory number P.Hamb.Graec. 1011 remained unnoticed at the Hamburg Carl von Ossietzky State and University Library. Now papyrologists Dr Lajos Berkes from the Institute for Christianity and Antiquity at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (HU), and Prof Gabriel Nocchi Macedo from the University of Liège, Belgium, have identified the fragment as the earliest surviving copy of the Infancy Gospel of Thomas .

History / Archeology - 03.06.2024
Medieval game collection unearthed
Medieval game collection unearthed
A team of archaeologists discovers an almost 1.000-year-old games collection including a well-preserved chessman, gaming pieces and dice. Laboratory analyses show that one party played with red. The laboratory results also allow conclusions to be drawn about the astonishing continuity of the rules of the game.

Chemistry - Physics - 03.06.2024
Paving the Way for Hydrogen from Algae Enzymes
Paving the Way for Hydrogen from Algae Enzymes
A research team from Bochum has identified a crucial detail that's essential for the production of hydrogen using biocatalysts. Under certain conditions, some algae are able to produce hydrogen - a much sought-after green energy source. Its production takes place in the unique catalytic center of the unicellular algae and is only possible if certain cofactors of the relevant proteins are present.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 03.06.2024
Kinship and ancestry of the Celts in Baden-Württemberg
Kinship and ancestry of the Celts in Baden-Württemberg
Genetic analyses of Celtic burial mounds from 500 BCE reveal close relationships and provide new insights into the power structures of early Celtic elites The Celtic culture of the pre-Roman Iron Age in Western and Central Europe has left numerous traces to this day, not least in the form of enormous burial mounds and spectacular archaeological artifacts.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.05.2024
The Route Into the Cell Influences the Outcome of Sars-Cov-2 Infection
The Route Into the Cell Influences the Outcome of Sars-Cov-2 Infection
A surface protein helps viruses to enter cells. This has far-reaching consequences for the infection. How exactly do Sars-Cov-2 particles enter host cells? An international team led by Dr Richard Brown from Dr Daniel Todt's Computational Virology group at the Department of Molecular and Medical Virology at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, together with researchers from the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, investigated this question.

Earth Sciences - 29.05.2024
Visiting flowers and transporting pollen in fragmented landscapes
Visiting flowers and transporting pollen in fragmented landscapes
Research team compares wild bee networks at a small scale and at landscape level   Traditionally, interactions between plants and their pollinators are analysed on the basis of visits to flowers. A research team led by the University of Göttingen studied wild bees on chalk grassland. The researchers analysed both the networks showing visits to flowers and the networks where pollen was transported.

Health - Microtechnics - 29.05.2024
How autonomous ultrasound can make everyday medical work easier
How autonomous ultrasound can make everyday medical work easier
Diagnostic support with artificial intelligence and robotics Prof. Nassir Navab from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) uses robotic ultrasound systems that perform routine examinations autonomously and support doctors in the operating theater. His research shows that these systems can make everyday life easier for doctors.

Life Sciences - 29.05.2024
The hunger games
The hunger games
Why do primates have big brains? In the Panamanian rainforest, scientists pitted large-brained primates against smaller-brained mammals to find out who was the smartest forager Primates, including humans, have larger brains than most other mammals, but why? Scientists searching for the answer have long followed a trail pointing to diet-specifically fruit-as the reason for why primates evolved larger brains.
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