news

news

News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
  • The selection of news is made by the team of myScience.ch. There is no right to be published or automatic publishing.
  •  RSS Feeds (Add this page to your bookmarks)
Physics - Jul 29
Physics
A team of German and American researchers from Augsburg, Münster, Edmonton, West Lafayette and Munich have detected the rolling movement of a nano-acoustic wave predicted by the famous physicist and Nobel prize-winner Lord Rayleigh in 1885. In a study published in the journal "Science Advances", the researchers use a nanowire inside which electrons are forced onto circular paths by the spin of the acoustic wave.
Materials Science - Jul 27
Materials Science

Researchers investigate which material properties support vessel formation / Study published in the journal "Nature Communications".

Chemistry - Jul 22
Chemistry

Heidelberg chemists succeed in producing synthesis and complete characterisation for the first time .

History - Jul 22
History

65,000 years ago Neanderthal from the Swabian Jura hunted horses and reindeer with hafted leaf-shaped stone points.

Environment - Jul 22
Environment

Göttingen researchers create new kind of environmentally friendly bioplastic with hydroplastic polymers.


Category

Years
2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009



Results 1 - 20 of 191.
1 2 3 4 5 10 Next »


Physics - Materials Science - 10:06
Spin-sonics: Acoustic wave gets the electrons spinning: Team of researchers first to demonstrate spin of a nano-sonic wave
Spin-sonics: Acoustic wave gets the electrons spinning: Team of researchers first to demonstrate spin of a nano-sonic wave
A team of German and American researchers from Augsburg, Münster, Edmonton, West Lafayette and Munich have detected the rolling movement of a nano-acoustic wave predicted by the famous physicist and Nobel prize-winner Lord Rayleigh in 1885. In a study published in the journal "Science Advances", the researchers use a nanowire inside which electrons are forced onto circular paths by the spin of the acoustic wave.

Materials Science - Health - 27.07.2021
First synthetic tissue model developed in which blood vessels can grow
First synthetic tissue model developed in which blood vessels can grow
Researchers investigate which material properties support vessel formation / Study published in the journal "Nature Communications" Using lab-created tissue to heal or replace damaged organs is one of the great visions for the future of medicine. Synthetic materials could be suitable as scaffolding for tissue because, unlike natural tissues, they remain stable in the organism long enough for the body to form new natural structures.

History / Archeology - 22.07.2021
Stone tool tells the story of Neanderthal hunting
Stone tool tells the story of Neanderthal hunting
65,000 years ago Neanderthal from the Swabian Jura hunted horses and reindeer with hafted leaf-shaped stone points. A newly discovered leaf point from the UNESCO World Heritage site of Hohle Fels Cave documents the evolution of hunting. A team under the direction of Professor Nicholas Conard for the University of Tübingen and the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment in southern Germany recovered the artifact underlying a layer dating to 65,000 years ago, which represents a minimum age for the find.

Chemistry - Physics - 22.07.2021
Silicon with a Two-Dimensional Structure
Silicon with a Two-Dimensional Structure
Heidelberg chemists succeed in producing synthesis and complete characterisation for the first time Silicon, a semi-metal, bonds in its natural form with four other elements and its three-dimensional structure takes the form of a tetrahedron. For a long time, it seemed impossible to achieve the synthesis and characterisation of a two-dimensional equivalent - geometrically speaking, a square.

Environment - Chemistry - 22.07.2021
Eco-friendly plastic from cellulose and water
Eco-friendly plastic from cellulose and water
Göttingen researchers create new kind of environmentally friendly bioplastic with hydroplastic polymers Plastics offer many benefits to society and are widely used in our daily life: they are lightweight, cheap and adaptable. However, the production, processing and disposal of plastics are simply not sustainable, and pose a major global threat to the environment and human health.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 21.07.2021
Long-period oscillations of the Sun discovered
Long-period oscillations of the Sun discovered
Ten years of data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory combined with numerical models reveal the deep low musical notes of the Sun   (mps) A team of solar physicists led by Professor Laurent Gizon of the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) and the University of Göttingen in Germany has reported the discovery of global oscillations of the Sun with very long periods, comparable to the 27-day solar rotation period.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2021
Cancer development is influenced by tissue type
Cancer development is influenced by tissue type
Why identical mutations cause different types of cancer Why do alterations of certain genes cause cancer only in specific organs of the human body? Scientists have now demonstrated that cells originating from different organs are differentially susceptible to activating mutations in cancer drivers: The same mutation in precursor cells of the pancreas or the bile duct leads to fundamental different outcomes.

Physics - 16.07.2021
Simplified method for calibrating optical tweezers: Broadband measurement of viscoelasticity with reduced measurement time
Simplified method for calibrating optical tweezers: Broadband measurement of viscoelasticity with reduced measurement time
Measurements of biomechanical properties inside living cells require minimally invasive methods. Optical tweezers are particularly attractive as a tool. It uses the momentum of light to trap and manipulate microor nanoscale particles. A team of researchers led by Cornelia Denz from the University of Münster has now developed a simplified method to perform the necessary calibration of the optical tweezers in the system under investigation.

Life Sciences - Physics - 15.07.2021
The virus trap
The virus trap
Hollow nano-objects made of DNA could trap viruses and render them harmless To date, there are no effective antidotes against most virus infections. An interdisciplinary research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed a new approach: they engulf and neutralize viruses with nano-capsules tailored from genetic material using the DNA origami method.

Economics / Business - 14.07.2021
Trust me, I'm a chatbot
Trust me, I’m a chatbot
Göttingen researchers investigate effect of non-human conversation partners in customer services   More and more companies are using chatbots in customer services. Due to advances in artificial intelligence and natural language processing, chatbots are often indistinguishable from humans when it comes to communication.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.07.2021
How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
Tracking future forest fires with AI As temperatures rise, the risk of devastating forest fires is increasing. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are using artificial intelligence to estimate the long-term impact that an increased number of forest fires will have on forest ecosystems.

Chemistry - 12.07.2021
Mechanical stimuli influence organ growth
Mechanical stimuli influence organ growth
Organoids help understand the complex interactions of cells and tissue In addition to chemical factors, mechanical influences play an important role in the natural growth of human organs such as kidneys, lungs and mammary glands - but also in the development of tumors. Now a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has investigated the process in detail using organoids, three-dimensional model systems of such organs which are produced in the laboratory.

Environment - 08.07.2021
CO2 storage through dead plant material
CO2 storage through dead plant material
Allowing plant residues to rot on the field is good for the climate Plants rotting in the soil are valuable for more than just compost. In fact, plant residues play a crucial role in keeping carbon in the soil, which is important for reducing the planet's CO2 emissions. This is the conclusion of a new study by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and other institutions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.07.2021
Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Climatic changes are increasingly giving rise to major fires on peatlands in the northern hemisphere, which release massive quantities of carbon dioxide. However, the biomass of the peatland is not entirely consumed by fire, some turns to charcoal in the absence of air. Now, Dr. Tianran Sun and Professor Lars Angenent from Environmental Biotechnology at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with colleagues at Cornell University in the USA have discovered that the carbonized biomass reduces production of the methane gases naturally occurring in the peat soil.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.07.2021
MHH fills important gap in lung research
MHH fills important gap in lung research
For the first time, a team of scientists clearly demonstrates the existence of lipofibroblasts in human luectron microscope In medical research, animal models are used to clarify the development of diseases and to develop suitable therapies. In order to be able to transfer the results to humans, however, it must be ensured that the cell types and molecular signalling pathways studied in detail actually occur in our bodies.

Physics - Mathematics - 07.07.2021
Zeitabhängige Berechnung eines Bose-Einstein-Kondensats
The term Bose-Einstein condensate describes a state of matter in which atoms or elementary particles combine into a single quantum mechanical object during extreme cooling. Science does not yet fully understand exactly how these macroscopic states - beyond the confines of traditional physics - develop from a thermal atomic cloud in just a few milliseconds and when statistical equilibrium is reached, according to Georg Wolschin.

Earth Sciences - 05.07.2021
The inner beauty of hailstones
The inner beauty of hailstones
The Tübingen region has recently seen hailstorms that brought back memories of the devastating storm of 2013. At that time, billions of dollars in damage were caused, and the damage from the most recent storms is still being assessed. Despite all the trouble hailstones cause, they also possess a previously unknown inner beauty.

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 05.07.2021
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Discovery from Unicorn Cave in Lower Saxony sheds new light on ancestors' cognitive abilities Since the discovery of the first fossil remains in the 19 th century, the image of the Neanderthal has been one of a primitive hominin. People have known for a long time that Neanderthals were able to effectively fashion tools and weapons.

Social Sciences - Health - 30.06.2021
Modernization makes older adults feel rushed, too
New international study on time perception among older adults Rapid societal changes can leave us feeling more rushed and pressured for time - and older adults are no exception, new research finds, led by Weill Cornell Medicine with participation of researchers of Humboldt University.

Physics - 30.06.2021
Multitalented filaments in living cells
Multitalented filaments in living cells
Göttingen researchers investigate special properties of protein structures   The cells that make up our bodies are constantly exposed to a wide variety of mechanical stresses. For example, the heart and lungs have to withstand lifelong expansion and contraction, our skin has to be as resistant to tearing as possible whilst retaining its elasticity, and immune cells are very squashy so that they can move through the body.
1 2 3 4 5 10 Next »