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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
  • The selection of news is made by the team of myScience.ch. There is no right to be published or automatic publishing.
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Life Sciences - Aug 14
Life Sciences
Young thale cress seedling (Arabidopsis thaliana) with the fluorescent biosensor in its cells. The false colour image shows the redox status of the NAD pool in the cells and tissue. Rainbow scale from blue (oxidized NAD pool) to red (reduced NAD pool). Almost all life on Earth, in particular our food and our health, depend on metabolism in plants.
Astronomy - Aug 10
Astronomy

Until a million years ago, dwarf planet Ceres, the largest body in the asteroid belt, was the scene of cryovolcanic eruptions: below the Occator Crater, subsurface brine pushed upward; the water evaporated, leaving behind bright, salty deposits.

Materials Science - Aug 5
Materials Science

Longer ranges for electric vehicles and the effective storage of electricity from renewable energies - these are research topics for the future which PhD students in Münster will be working on in a new international Graduate School.

Life Sciences - Aug 7

How growth rates influence the fitness of bacteria - Bacteria are survival artists: When they get nutrition, they multiply rapidly, albeit they can also survive periods of hunger. But, when they grow too quickly, their ability to survive is hampered, as studies by a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) on E. coli bacteria show.

Environment - Aug 4
Environment

Declines in the diversity and abundance of decomposers explain reductions in plant decay rates under the influence of chemical stressors, but not added nutrients.


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Life Sciences - Environment - 14.08.2020
Watching changes in plant metabolism - live
Watching changes in plant metabolism - live
Young thale cress seedling (Arabidopsis thaliana) with the fluorescent biosensor in its cells. The false colour image shows the redox status of the NAD pool in the cells and tissue. Rainbow scale from blue (oxidized NAD pool) to red (reduced NAD pool). Almost all life on Earth, in particular our food and our health, depend on metabolism in plants.

Astronomy / Space Science - 10.08.2020
Dwarf Planet Ceres: Evidence of Active Cryovolcanism
Dwarf Planet Ceres: Evidence of Active Cryovolcanism
Until a million years ago, dwarf planet Ceres, the largest body in the asteroid belt, was the scene of cryovolcanic eruptions: below the Occator Crater, subsurface brine pushed upward; the water evaporated, leaving behind bright, salty deposits. This process is probably still ongoing. A team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany comes to these conclusions after evaluating high-resolution camera images of Ceres from the final phase of NASA's Dawn mission.

Life Sciences - 07.08.2020
Grow faster, die sooner
How growth rates influence the fitness of bacteria Bacteria are survival artists: When they get nutrition, they multiply rapidly, albeit they can also survive periods of hunger. But, when they grow too quickly, their ability to survive is hampered, as studies by a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) on E. coli bacteria show.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 05.08.2020
Battery Research Centre: new international research school opened
Battery Research Centre: new international research school opened
Longer ranges for electric vehicles and the effective storage of electricity from renewable energies - these are research topics for the future which PhD students in Münster will be working on in a new international Graduate School. The research centre for "Battery Chemistry, Characterization, Analysis, Recycling and Application" (BACCARA for short) was officially opened on August 5 at the MEET Battery Research Centre at the University of Münster.

Environment - 04.08.2020
Chemicals Inhibit Decomposition Processes - by Damaging Biodiversity
Chemicals Inhibit Decomposition Processes - by Damaging Biodiversity
Declines in the diversity and abundance of decomposers explain reductions in plant decay rates under the influence of chemical stressors, but not added nutrients. These are the new insights of a study published in the open access journal eLife. The global meta-analysis conducted by researchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Leipzig University (UL) and the University of Namur in Belgium highlights the main anthropogenic effects on the biodiversity and functioning of ecosystems, and thus helps predicting the fate of different ecosystems around the world.

Environment - 04.08.2020
Identifying the Blind Spots of Soil Biodiversity
Identifying the Blind Spots of Soil Biodiversity
Soils harbour a substantial part of the world's biodiversity, yet data on the patterns and processes taking place below ground does not represent all relevant ecosystems and taxa. For example, tropical and subtropical regions largely remain a blind spot when it comes to soil biodiversity. This is one of the results of a new study published and led by scientists from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research, the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and Leipzig University.

Physics - 29.07.2020
Strongest Coupling of Light and Matter by Synthetic Gold Crystals
Research Team Led by Freie Universität Designs New Materials No 133/2020 from Jul 29, 2020 Scientists at Freie Universität Berlin, Universität Hamburg, and Universidade Federaldo Ceará in Brazil showed that crystals of tiny gold spheres bind light. The new material shows the strongest coupling to light reported so far.

Physics - Materials Science - 29.07.2020
Tailored light inspired by nature
Tailored light inspired by nature
Researchers develop for the first time light fields using caustics that do not change during propagation / Study in "Nature Communications" Modern applications as high resolution microsopy or microor nanoscale material processing require customized laser beams that do not change during propagation. This represents an immense challenge since light typically broadens during propagation, a phenomenon known as diffraction.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.07.2020
Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity
Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity
New international research breaks ground for the next generation of biodiversity forecasts No 131/2020 from Jul 29, 2020 Biodiversity's ongoing global decline has prompted policies to protect and restore habitats to minimize animal and plant extinctions. However, biodiversity forecasts used to inform these policies are usually based on assumptions of a simple theoretical model describing how the number of species changes with the amount of habitat.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 28.07.2020
How stony-iron meteorites form
How stony-iron meteorites form
SAPHiR multi-anvil press solves mystery of the solar system Meteorites give us insight into the early development of the solar system. Using the SAPHiR instrument at the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a scientific team has for the first time simulated the formation of a class of stony-iron meteorites, so-called pallasites, on a purely experimental basis.

Health - Economics / Business - 28.07.2020
How will the population accept COVID-19 tracing apps?
How will the population accept COVID-19 tracing apps?
Research team led by the University of Göttingen analyses design and communication strategies for mass acceptance Coronavirus tracing applications for the detection of infection chains are currently being developed and made available across the world. Such contact-tracing apps are a central component of national strategies for relaxing restrictions.

Life Sciences - 27.07.2020
European and American maize: same same, but different
European and American maize: same same, but different
Adapting maize plants to climate change German researchers decoded the European maize genome. In comparison to North American maize lines, they discovered differences. For cultivation of maize in areas with low yields and for challenges imposed by the climate change these observations of the research team led by Klaus F.X. Mayer, head of the research group "Plant Genome and Systems Biology" at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Chris-Carolin Schön, Professor for Plant Breeding at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) might be of particular interest.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 24.07.2020
More effective sharing of research data
More effective sharing of research data
National research data infrastructure: TUM involved in three consortia Genome sequencing produces immense quantities of data. The aim of the German Human Genome-Phenome Archive (GHGA) is to make these data available to science without violating the personality rights of patients. The GHGA will focus initially on data collections pertaining to cancer and rare genetic disorders.

Environment - 22.07.2020
Restoring Nature
Restoring Nature
An abandoned space in the middle of Münster: in the historic medicinal plant garden, which hasn't been in use since 2016, nature can pretty much do what it likes. At least, it almost can - anyone who fights their way through an overgrown meadow between Einsteinstraße and Schlossgräfte will come across a clearing, about 50 square metres in size, on which meadow plants are arranged in rows of pots standing on black groundsheets.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.07.2020
Largest stony meteorite of Germany found: Researchers at the University of Münster confirm
Largest stony meteorite of Germany found: Researchers at the University of Münster confirm
Even in science, chance sometimes produces more thrilling discoveries that the most ambitious plans. In 1989, a homeowner was digging a cable trench on his property in Blaubeuren, in the German region of Swabia, when his spade hit a rock measuring 28 by 25 by 20 centimetres. Upon lifting it half a metre to the surface, he found that it was remarkably heavy.

Environment - Health - 21.07.2020
Cavefish have fewer cells of the innate immune system
Cavefish have fewer cells of the innate immune system
Adaptation of cavefish to low-parasite environment may provide autoimmune disease insight / Study published in "Nature Ecology & Evolution" Cavefish are small, live in tucked away places humans rarely go, and they're common enough that you can find them on every continent except Antarctica. But they also have another characteristic that seems surprising at first glance: They can tell researchers something about the occurrence of autoimmune diseases in humans.

Life Sciences - 20.07.2020
Reproductive genetics: New gene for male infertility discovered
Reproductive genetics: New gene for male infertility discovered
Impairment of sperm formation: male infertility is not only a concern for those affected but is also something which the working group led by Prof. Frank Tüttelmann is researching into. The Reproductive Genetics team at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Münster is running a multitude of projects as it attempts to get to the bottom of further causes of male infertility.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.07.2020
A chemical tailor-made suit for Alzheimer's drugs
A chemical tailor-made suit for Alzheimer’s drugs
Research team from Göttingen and Halle develops new inhibitors for enzymes With over 1.2 million people affected in Germany alone and over 50 million people worldwide, Alzheimer's disease, also referred to simply as Alzheimer's, is one of the greatest medical and social challenges of our time.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 16.07.2020
Researchers solve a long-standing problem in organic chemistry
Researchers solve a long-standing problem in organic chemistry
Chemists at the University of Münster develop a bioinspired strategy for the controlled synthesis of polyenes / Study published in "Science" They occur in nature, are reactive and play a role in many biological processes: polyenes. It is no wonder that chemists have for a long time been interested in efficiently constructing these compounds - not least in order to be able to use them for future biomedical applications.

Physics - Materials Science - 16.07.2020
Topological control by tuning structural chirality
Topological control by tuning structural chirality
Chiral crystals that have a distinct handedness have recently emerged as one of  the most exciting new classes of topological materials. An international research team from institutions in Germany, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and China has now demonstrated that their crystal handedness directly determines how quasiparticles propagate and scatter at impurities in such materials.
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