news 2011

Astronomy - Feb 17
Astronomy
Planetologists from Münster University show that the meteorite contains minerals that formed under the presence of water on small planetesimals in the early history of our solar system. A fireball in the sky, accompanied by a bang, amazed hundreds of eyewitnesses in northern Germany in mid-September last year.
Life Sciences - Feb 12
Life Sciences

Transport proteins can switch between microtubule network and actin network Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment.

Life Sciences - Feb 5
Life Sciences

While viruses and bacteria regularly manage to infect the human organism, fungi only very rarely succeed.

Physics - Feb 10
Physics

The development of a quantum computer that can solve problems, which classical computers can only solve with great effort or not at all - this is the goal currently being pursued by an ever-growing number of research teams worldwide.

Life Sciences - Feb 5

A bumble bee's diet affects survival and reproductive capabilities Are bees dying of malnourishment? Professor Sara Diana Leonhardt examines the interactions between plants and insects with her work group at the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan.


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Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2011
The Import Business of Cellular Power Plants Freiburg Scientists Reveal Newly Discovered Communication Path in Cells
Scientists from Freiburg's two Excellence Institutions Centre for Biological Signalling Studies (BIOSS) and Spemann Graduate School of Biology and Medicine (SGBM) have discovered a new signaling path in cells: a mechanism which enables the transport of proteins into mitochondria to be adjusted depending on the current metabolic state of the cell.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 07.01.2011
Proteins Need Chaperones
Freiburg Biochemist Describes Newly Discovered Processes in Production of Proteins in 'Nature' Freiburg, 07.01.2011 The chaperone ZRF1 helps the ribosome to regulate protein synthesis. A new study shows that it also participates in the regulated translation of DNA segments into transcripts in the nucleus.

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