Leipzig biophysicists decipher functionality of adrenaline-binding receptor

Life Sciences - Jun 21
Life Sciences

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the human body and are involved in many complex signalling pathways. Despite their importance in many biological processes, the central mechanism of G protein-coupling and the associated signal transmission is not yet understood. A team of researchers from Leipzig University has succeeded in understanding the mechanism of signal transmission through an adrenaline-binding receptor at the atomic level. In the future, researchers may be able to use these results to better avoid side effects when developing drugs. The study has been published in the journal Nature Structural & Molecular Biology.

Life Sciences - Jun 21

How a Biocatalyst Might Boost the Growth of Microalgae

Life Sciences

A sensor for nitrogen could be hidden behind the extension of an enzyme for the breakdown of starch. If this sensor detects a high level of nitrogen, algal growth switches into turbo mode.

Economics - Jun 20

Costs of Sanctions

What effect do economic sanctions have on the countries affected, such as Russia or Iran? Economists from Würzburg, Kiel, Berlin and Bielefeld have analysed these questions.

Physics - Jun 21

Intricate processes in photosynthesis decoded using advanced electron microscopy technique

An international team of researchers visualises atomic interactions in the protein structure called photosystem II and thus uncovers fundamental biochemical processes.

Life Sciences - Jun 20

How cells boost gene expression

Research team at Göttingen University discovers important function of antisense non-coding RNA. The function of non-coding RNA in the cell has long been a mystery to researchers.

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Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 21.06.2024 - Today
Leipzig biophysicists decipher functionality of adrenaline-binding receptor
Leipzig biophysicists decipher functionality of adrenaline-binding receptor
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the human body and are involved in many complex signalling pathways. Despite their importance in many biological processes, the central mechanism of G protein-coupling and the associated signal transmission is not yet understood. A team of researchers from Leipzig University has succeeded in understanding the mechanism of signal transmission through an adrenaline-binding receptor at the atomic level.

Life Sciences - 21.06.2024 - Today
How a Biocatalyst Might Boost the Growth of Microalgae
How a Biocatalyst Might Boost the Growth of Microalgae
A sensor for nitrogen could be hidden behind the extension of an enzyme for the breakdown of starch. If this sensor detects a high level of nitrogen, algal growth switches into turbo mode. Living organisms consist to a large extent of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds. These have to be taken in with food or, in the case of plants, produced through photosynthesis.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.06.2024 - Today
Intricate processes in photosynthesis decoded using advanced electron microscopy technique
An international team of researchers visualises atomic interactions in the protein structure called photosystem II and thus uncovers fundamental biochemical processes. Using cryo-electron microscopy a team of scientists from Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (HU), the Swedish universities of Umeå and Uppsala and the University of Potsdam has succeeded in visualising atomic structures at an unprecedented resolution at the nanometre level underlying the process of photosynthesis.

Economics - 20.06.2024
Costs of Sanctions
What effect do economic sanctions have on the countries affected, such as Russia or Iran? Economists from Würzburg, Kiel, Berlin and Bielefeld have analysed these questions. Economic sanctions can be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, they usually reduce gross domestic product and thus prosperity in the affected countries, as intended.

Life Sciences - 20.06.2024
How cells boost gene expression
Research team at Göttingen University discovers important function of antisense non-coding RNA   The function of non-coding RNA in the cell has long been a mystery to researchers. Unlike coding RNA, non-coding RNA does not produce proteins - yet it exists in large quantities. A research team from the University of Göttingen has now discovered an important function of antisense RNA (asRNA): the researchers found that asRNA acts as a "superhighway" in cell transport and thus accelerates gene expression.

Environment - 20.06.2024
Shift of clouds from day to night increases global warming
Shift of clouds from day to night increases global warming
In a warming climate, cloud patterns change in such a way that they exacerbate global warming. A research group led by Johannes Quaas from Leipzig University and Hao Luo and Yong Han from Sun Yat-sen University in China has discovered that the cloud cover is increasingly showing asymmetrical changes: it decreases more during the day than at night.

Environment - 19.06.2024
Which herb has grown against climate changes
Which herb has grown against climate changes
Botanical gardens are found all'over the world and are home to plants from all'over the world. They are therefore ideal study platforms for researchers to find out how different plants react to changes - for example as a result of climate change. Numerous scientific studies are now being carried out in cooperation with botanical gardens, including the "PhenObs" project of the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research Halle-Jena-Leipzig (iDiv) .

Health - Life Sciences - 19.06.2024
Pupil dilation decreases with age
Pupil dilation decreases with age
Our eyesight declines with age: Poor lighting or strong contrasts between light and dark can limit the ability of older people to react in everyday life, resulting in a negative impact on the sleep-wake-rhythm. As neuroscientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen and the University of Basel confirm, this is also due to the diminishing ability of the eye's pupil to dilate sufficiently.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.06.2024
Blood Markers Detect Rare Forms of Dementia as well as the Neurological Diseases ALS and PSP
Blood Markers Detect Rare Forms of Dementia as well as the Neurological Diseases ALS and PSP
In a study with 991 adults, scientists at DZNE show that the most common forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) as well as the neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) can be recognised by blood testing. Their procedure is not yet ready for routine medical use, but in the long term it could facilitate disease diagnosis and advance the development of new therapies already now.

Environment - 17.06.2024
Understanding the Green Sahara's Collapse
Understanding the Green Sahara’s Collapse
TUM Scientists Develop New Method for Early Detection of Climate Tipping Points Abrupt shifts within complex systems such as the Earth's climate system are extremely hard to predict. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) have now succeeded in developing a new method to anticipate such tipping points in advance.

Chemistry - Environment - 17.06.2024
Golden Ball Mills as Green Catalysts
Golden Ball Mills as Green Catalysts
Less waste, mild reaction conditions, and no harmful solvents - only a very thin layer of gold is necessary to sustainably convert alcohols into aldehydes through mechanochemistry. A gold-coated milling vessel for ball mills proved to be a real marvel in the research work by Inorganic Chemistry at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany: Without any solvents or environmentally harmful chemicals, the team led by Professor Lars Borchardt was able to use it to convert alcohols into aldehydes.

Computer Science - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.06.2024
AI shows how field crops develop
AI shows how field crops develop
Tool developed at the University of Bonn should enable yield forecasts, among other things, in the future Researchers at the University of Bonn have developed software that can simulate the growth of field crops. To do this, they fed thousands of photos from field experiments into a learning algorithm.

Astronomy / Space - 14.06.2024
Exceptional Black Hole Discovered in the Milky Way
Exceptional Black Hole Discovered in the Milky Way
Heidelberg researchers played a leading role in evaluating the data from the Gaia space observatory A mere 2,000 light years from Earth lies a black hole approximately 33 times the mass of the sun. The object known as Gaia BH3 - the most massive black hole ever discovered in the Milky Way - was detected with the aid of the Gaia space observatory of the European Space Agency (ESA).

Politics - 14.06.2024
Impact of Russian social media campaigns less pronounced than often assumed
Impact of Russian social media campaigns less pronounced than often assumed
War-related disinformation most effective among conspiracy-minded people Most people do not believe the disinformation spread by Russia about the war in Ukraine, even if they regularly use social media. Instead, the decisive factor in the efficacy of this propaganda is whether a person is fundamentally receptive to conspiracy narratives.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 13.06.2024
Vitamin B6: New Compound Delays Degradation
Vitamin B6: New Compound Delays Degradation
A low vitamin B6 level has negative effects on brain performance. A research team from Würzburg University Medicine has now found a way to delay the degradation of the vitamin. Vitamin B6 is important for brain metabolism. Accordingly, in various mental illnesses, a low vitamin B6 level is associated with impaired memory and learning abilities, with a depressive mood, and even with genuine depression.

Environment - Economics - 13.06.2024
Land management and climate change affect several
Land management and climate change affect several
A new study published in the journal Nature Communications shows that grassland and arable land could better provide different services at the same time if the use of pesticides and mineral fertilizers is reduced. According to the researchers from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Leipzig University (UL) and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), these results also apply under possible future climate conditions.

Astronomy / Space - 12.06.2024
Cosmic roulette
Cosmic roulette
Almost four billion light years away from Earth in the centre of the galaxy OJ287, two giant black holes orbit each other, which are approximately 18 billion and 150 million times more massive than our sun. The larger of the two black holes is surrounded by a vast accretion disk, a rotating disk of matter that flows towards the black hole at its centre.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 12.06.2024
Ritual sacrifice at Chichén Itzá
Ritual sacrifice at Chichén Itzá
Ancient Maya genomes reveal the practice of male twin sacrifice and the enduring genetic legacy of colonial-era epidemics Rising to power in the wake of the Classic Maya collapse, Chichén Itzá was among the largest and most influential cities of the ancient Maya, but much about its political connections and ritual life remain poorly understood.

Health - History / Archeology - 12.06.2024
Origin and spread of malaria
Origin and spread of malaria
Scientists reconstruct ancient genomes of the two most deadly malaria parasites, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum In a new study, an international team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, reconstructed the evolutionary history and global spread of malaria over the past 5,500 years, identifying trade , warfare, and colonialism as major catalysts for its dispersal.

Social Sciences - Career - 10.06.2024
Italian Moms Work far Fewer Years than Dads, while Finland Shows Equality
Italian Moms Work far Fewer Years than Dads, while Finland Shows Equality
Significant differences in the working lives of mothers and fathers in Italy - Finland, on the other hand, balanced A study by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research shows that, in contrast to Finland, from midlife mothers in Italy and the US work significantly fewer years than fathers, especially if they have two and more children.
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