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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
  • The selection of news is made by the team of myScience.ch. There is no right to be published or automatic publishing.
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Life Sciences - Oct 5
Life Sciences
In the brain of adult mammals neural stem cells ensure that new nerve cells, i.e. neurons, are constantly formed. This process, known as adult neurogenesis, helps mice maintain their sense of smell. A research team led by Dr Francesca Ciccolini at the Interdisciplinary Center for Neurosciences (IZN) of Heidelberg University recently discovered a second stem cell population in the mouse brain. This new type of stem cell, and not the one previously known, is primarily involved in the production of new neurons in the olfactory bulb of adult mice.
Environment - Oct 5
Environment

International study with participation of the University of Bonn reveals type and age of diatoms. A new study led by the University of Tasmania - with the participation of the University of Bonn - discovered the oldest marine DNA in deep-sea sediments of the Scotia Sea north of the Antarctic continent.

Environment - Oct 4
Environment

Machine learning improves climate models - Accurately modeling extreme precipitation events remains a major challenge for climate models.

Materials Science - Oct 4
Materials Science

Although just cute little creatures at first glance, the microscopic geckos and octopuses fabricated by 3D laser printing in the molecular engineering labs at Heidelberg University could open up new opportunities in fields such as microrobotics or biomedicine.

Chemistry - Oct 3
Chemistry

Progress has been made on the path to sunlight-driven production of hydrogen. Chemists from Würzburg present a new enzyme-like molecular catalyst for water oxidation.


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Life Sciences - 05.10.2022
Second Stem Cell Type Discovered in Mouse Brain
Second Stem Cell Type Discovered in Mouse Brain
In the brain of adult mammals neural stem cells ensure that new nerve cells, i.e. neurons, are constantly formed. This process, known as adult neurogenesis, helps mice maintain their sense of smell. A research team led by Dr Francesca Ciccolini at the Interdisciplinary Center for Neurosciences (IZN) of Heidelberg University recently discovered a second stem cell population in the mouse brain.

Environment - 05.10.2022
1 million-year-old marine DNA found in Antarctic sediment
1 million-year-old marine DNA found in Antarctic sediment
International study with participation of the University of Bonn reveals type and age of diatoms A new study led by the University of Tasmania - with the participation of the University of Bonn - discovered the oldest marine DNA in deep-sea sediments of the Scotia Sea north of the Antarctic continent.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 04.10.2022
Microscopic Octopuses from a 3D Printer
Microscopic Octopuses from a 3D Printer
Although just cute little creatures at first glance, the microscopic geckos and octopuses fabricated by 3D laser printing in the molecular engineering labs at Heidelberg University could open up new opportunities in fields such as microrobotics or biomedicine. The printed microstructures are made from novel materials - known as smart polymers - whose size and mechanical properties can be tuned on demand and with high precision.

Environment - Computer Science - 04.10.2022
Climate simulation more realistic with Artificial Intelligence
Climate simulation more realistic with Artificial Intelligence
Machine learning improves climate models Accurately modeling extreme precipitation events remains a major challenge for climate models. These models predict how the earth's climate may change over the course of decades and even centuries. To improve them especially with regard to extreme events, researchers now use machine learning methods otherwise applied to image generation.

Chemistry - Physics - 03.10.2022
Artificial Enzyme Splits Water
Artificial Enzyme Splits Water
Progress has been made on the path to sunlight-driven production of hydrogen. Chemists from Würzburg present a new enzyme-like molecular catalyst for water oxidation. Mankind is facing a central challenge: it must manage the transition to a sustainable and carbon dioxide-neutral energy economy. Hydrogen is considered a promising alternative to fossil fuels.

Environment - 30.09.2022
Specialized insects hardly benefit from conservation measures
Specialized insects hardly benefit from conservation measures
Study on changes in the Swiss flora and the effects on flower-visiting insects A German-Swiss team of scientists from the Universities of Bonn, Zurich and Basel and the Natural History Museum in Stuttgart has analyzed changes in Swiss flora since 2002 in a study. The results show that generalists among plant species have increased again due to conservation efforts.

Physics - Materials Science - 30.09.2022
Quantum matter: entanglement of many atoms detected for the first time
Quantum matter: entanglement of many atoms detected for the first time
New insights into quantum phenomena at phase transitions In the past, quantum phenomena could be investigated only in the realm of just a few atoms. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Technical University of Dresden (TUD) has now discovered conditions for which quantum entanglement dominates on much larger scales.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 30.09.2022
New insights into tumour biology
New insights into tumour biology
The ancient Egyptians, as described in the Ebers Papyrus, already knew that palpation -feeling for hardened lumps - can help diagnose breast cancer. Palpation is still an important element in early screening for breast cancer. On the other hand, measurements on individual cancer cells show that they are softer than the healthy epithelial cells from which they stem, which probably makes them better able to metastasise in dense human tissue.

Transport - 30.09.2022
Latest Issue on Smart Mobility
Latest Issue on Smart Mobility
TUM Science Magazine ,,Faszination Forschung" Mobility and goods transport have to become more climate-friendly, low-noise, low-emitting, intelligent and connected in the future. In addition, it is vital that we embed new forms of mobility into existing infrastructures and integrate them into highly livable urban design.

Paleontology - Environment - 29.09.2022
To be heavy or not - that is the question
To be heavy or not - that is the question
Researchers at the University of Bonn study the way of life of extinct amphibians If you need to lurk at the bottom of a water body waiting for prey, it is wise to stay motionless without resisting against the buoyant forces of water. To do so you need a kind of diving belt that helps to sink. One large amphibian species Metoposaurus krasiejowensis, that lived more than 200 million years ago, compensated for buoyancy with a heavy shoulder girdle.

Social Sciences - 29.09.2022
Exposure to accents helps children learn words
University of Freiburg study on vocabulary acquisition uses novel game-based design Freiburg, Sep 29, 2022 If elementary school children are accustomed to many regional and foreign accents because they hear them frequently in their linguistic environment, then it is easier for them to learn new words from other children who speak with unfamiliar accents.

Physics - Health - 29.09.2022
How contrast agents disperse inside cells
How contrast agents disperse inside cells
Detailed images of cells with X-ray contrast agents Contrast agents are often used to improve the imaging of soft tissue in micro-computed tomography (microCT). Now a research team led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has investigated how these agents disperse inside cells. Their findings could improve the assessment and further development of contrast agents and might contribute to future medical diagnostics.

Music - Health - 28.09.2022
Wind music causes less transmission than singing
Playing wind instruments spreads more viruses than breathing, but less than speaking or singing A relatively large number of viruses can emerge from the clarinet. It releases considerably more aerosols, which can contain pathogens such as Sars-CoV-2, compared to other instruments such as the flute. However, the risk of transmission from an infected person playing a wind instrument is generally much lower than for people who sing or speak, provided that one spends the same amount of time in their vicinity.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.09.2022
Birth of a sibling triggers long-lasting stress in young bonobos
Birth of a sibling triggers long-lasting stress in young bonobos
First-of-its-kind study identifies physiological changes in the transition to siblinghood In any family, the birth of a child is a transformative event, often greeted with positive feelings from parents-and mixed feelings from siblings. The arrival of a new brother or sister, and the loss of parental attention that comes with it, is stressful for any first-born child.

Agronomy / Food Science - Chemistry - 27.09.2022
Germany's oldest beer scientifically considered
Germany’s oldest beer scientifically considered
Study reveals molecular profile of 19th century beer sample After almost 140 years, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) opened a lager beer that had been kept at room temperature throughout to analyze it. The beer, dating back to 1885, has now been characterized sensorially and analytically.

Environment - 26.09.2022
Early modern humans in Africa used high-tech adhesives extracted from a local conifer
Early modern humans in Africa used high-tech adhesives extracted from a local conifer
The second option is more difficult and time consuming. In it, the leaves have to be heated in a kind of underground distillery for several hours, so that the tar drips into a container. It is not known which method was used. Either way, says Schmidt, it was astonishing that early modern humans at that time did not use any plants other than yellowwoods as sources of glue.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 22.09.2022
What the 'prey' of a peregrine falcon tells us about the beginnings of our solar system
What the ’prey’ of a peregrine falcon tells us about the beginnings of our solar system
An international research team led by Tomoki Nakamura (Tohoku, Japan) has studied soil samples collected by the Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa-2 on the asteroid Ryugu. Falko Langenhorst of Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany, was part of the group that gained insights into the formation of the asteroid and the unique processes that took place during the first five million years after the birth of our solar system from the analysis of the extraterrestrial material.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.09.2022
Show me your brain scan and I'll tell you how old you really are
Show me your brain scan and I’ll tell you how old you really are
Electronic comparison of MRI images opens up new possibilities for early detection of diseases The biological age of a person can be accurately determined from brain images using the latest AI technology, so-called artificial neural networks. Until now, however, it was unclear which features these networks used to infer age.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 22.09.2022
Gas bubble swirls around the heart of the Milky Way
Gas bubble swirls around the heart of the Milky Way
Researchers discover a hot spot near the Sagittarius A* black hole with the Alma radio telescope. There is a black hole in the center of our Milky Way. In the immediate vicinity of this mass monster called Sagittarius A*, things are turbulent. Now, an international group led by Maciek Wielgus of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn has discovered an object that orbits the black hole on a very narrow path in only about 70 minutes.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.09.2022
Zebrafish change their sex in warm water
Zebrafish change their sex in warm water
Research team led by Göttingen University identify DNA -hotspots- that tell zebrafish to change sex in warmer waters. Environment leaves its mark on genome through DNA methylation. In many species, such as zebrafish, sex is partly or completely determined by the environment. Genes can predispose to a particular sex but may be -overruled- by the influence of the environment, for example temperature or population density.
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