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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
  • The selection of news is made by the team of myScience.ch. There is no right to be published or automatic publishing.
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Life Sciences - Jun 27
Life Sciences
The causes of intelligence impairment or epilepsy remain unexplained in more than 50 per cent of cases. Together with international colleagues, researchers at Leipzig University Hospital have discovered two genes with mutations that cause neurodevelopmental disorders in children. Their findings have now been published in scientific journals.
Life Sciences - Jun 24
Life Sciences

Proteins control and organize almost every aspect of life. The totality of all proteins in a living organism, a tissue or a cell is called the proteome.

Physics - Jun 23
Physics

After 60 years of unsuccessful searches, an international research team has discovered a neutral nucleus for the first time - the tetra-neutron.

Earth Sciences - Jun 24
Earth Sciences

Global warming and a progressively drier climate in many parts of the world are causing more dust storms.

Environment - Jun 23

Study with participation of University of Cologne economist finds that many air travellers more readily choose faster, but more expensive carbon offsetting options online if selecting a slower option requires action. However, the readiness to do so decreases the greater the gap between the most and the least expensive option gets / publication in 'Nature Human Behaviour'


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Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2022
Tracking down the causes of rare diseases in children
Tracking down the causes of rare diseases in children
The causes of intelligence impairment or epilepsy remain unexplained in more than 50 per cent of cases. Together with international colleagues, researchers at Leipzig University Hospital have discovered two genes with mutations that cause neurodevelopmental disorders in children. Their findings have now been published in scientific journals.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.06.2022
Mass spectrometry-based draft of the mouse proteome
Mass spectrometry-based draft of the mouse proteome
Proteins control and organize almost every aspect of life. The totality of all proteins in a living organism, a tissue or a cell is called the proteome. Using mass spectrometry, researchers at the TUM School of Life Sciences characterize the proteome, or protein complement of the genome, in important model organisms.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 24.06.2022
Defects in quartz crystal structure reveal the origin of dust
Defects in quartz crystal structure reveal the origin of dust
Global warming and a progressively drier climate in many parts of the world are causing more dust storms. To predict how these storms are caused, researchers are looking into the past to understand where the dust came from, for how long, and over what distances it was transported. An international research team led by Dr. Aditi K. Dave and Professor Kathryn Fitzsimmons from the Department of Geosciences at the University of Tübingen, along with colleagues from Romania, Brazil, Kazakhstan and Tajikistan, have now developed a new method of doing this.

Physics - 23.06.2022
Long-sought tetra-neutron discovered
Long-sought tetra-neutron discovered
After 60 years of unsuccessful searches, an international research team has discovered a neutral nucleus for the first time - the tetra-neutron. The collaboration succeeded in creating an isolated four-neutron system with low relative kinetic energy in a volume equivalent to an atomic nucleus. The building blocks of atomic nuclei are the nucleons, which come in two types, the neutral neutrons and the positively charged protons - the two so-called isospin states of the nucleon.

Environment - Economics / Business - 23.06.2022
Default options facilitate faster carbon offsetting in air travel
Study with participation of University of Cologne economist finds that many air travellers more readily choose faster, but more expensive carbon offsetting options online if selecting a slower option requires action. However, the readiness to do so decreases the greater the gap between the most and the least expensive option gets / publication in 'Nature Human Behaviour' The defaults on a carbon offsetting website can cause a large percentage of customers to select faster CO2 compensation, even if this entails higher costs.

Life Sciences - 23.06.2022
Silence for thought
Silence for thought
Scientists map prominent differences in the neural circuits of mice, monkeys, and human The analysis of the human brain is a central goal of neuroscience. However, for methodological reasons, research has largely focused on model organisms, in particular the mouse. Now, neuroscientists gained novel insights on human neural circuitry using tissue obtained from neurosurgical interventions.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.06.2022
Research with a bite
Research with a bite
Scientists at the University of Bonn present a sensor system that can measure the bite force of insects How hard can insects bite? Having a strong chewing apparatus makes it easier to crush harder food and to succeed in fights with enemies. Biologists at the University of Bonn now present a mobile system (forceX) for measuring the bite forces of small animals, along with the software forceR to evaluate the data.

History / Archeology - 22.06.2022
Britains earliest humans
Britains earliest humans
Homo heidelbergensis may have occupied southern Britain between 560,000 and 620,000 years ago Archaeological discoveries made on the outskirts of Canterbury, Kent (England) confirm the presence of early humans in southern Britain between 560,000 and 620,000 years ago. The breakthrough, involving controlled excavations and radiometric dating, comes a century after stone tool artefacts were first uncovered at the site.

Physics - Life Sciences - 22.06.2022
Microscopy technique enables 3D super-resolution nanometre-scale imaging
Microscopy technique enables 3D super-resolution nanometre-scale imaging
Research team led by Göttingen University combine two techniques to achieve isotropic super -resolution imaging Over the last two decades, microscopy has seen unprecedented advances in speed and resolution. However, cellular structures are essentially three-dimensional, and conventional super-resolution techniques often lack the necessary resolution in all three directions to capture details at a nanometer scale.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.06.2022
Huge pool of heat in the Pacific caused by climate change
Huge pool of heat in the Pacific caused by climate change
A long-term warm water body that continues to warm has now been discovered by a team from the CLICCS Cluster of Excellence at the University of Hamburg. It is three million square kilometers in size, is due to the human-induced increase in greenhouse gases, and favors extreme heat waves in the Northeast Pacific.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 21.06.2022
Using light to activate mRNA: Biochemists use new tool to control mRNA by means of light
Using light to activate mRNA: Biochemists use new tool to control mRNA by means of light
DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is a long chain of molecules composed of many individual components, and it forms the basis of life on Earth. The function of DNA is to store all genetic information. The translation of this genetic information into proteins - which an organism needs to function, develop and reproduce - takes place via mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid).

Life Sciences - Physics - 21.06.2022
Another step towards synthetic cells
Another step towards synthetic cells
Introducing functional DNA-based cytoskeletons into cell-sized compartments - Publication Scientists from the 2. Physics Institute at the University of Stuttgart and the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research were now able to take the next step towards synthetic cells: They introduced functional DNA-based cytoskeletons into cell-sized compartments and showed functionality.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.06.2022
A nose for damaged plants and fake perfumes
A nose for damaged plants and fake perfumes
Researchers develop a highly sensitive novel technique capable of detecting chiral molecules within complex gas mixtures The chiral signature of a fragrance can reveal whether a perfume is genuine or fake. Similarly, the chiral signature of the emissions of a plant can provide information on whether the plant is healthy or sick.

Environment - 21.06.2022
Modern wind turbines can more than compensate for decline in global wind resource
Freiburg environmental meteorologists develop global techno-climatic scenarios and site projections until 2060 Wind energy contributes significantly to the energy sector's sustainable, low-CO2 transformation. However, the efficiency of wind turbines depends on available wind resources and the technical characteristics of the turbines.

Physics - Innovation - 20.06.2022
Using quantum technology to ensure low-noise microphones
Using quantum technology to ensure low-noise microphones
Use of quantum light leads to a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio [Picture: PI 3 / Florian Kaiser] Whether it's an online conference or a hearing aid, a high noise level in the microphones used, or significant background noise will disrupt any conversation, and better microphones are urgently needed.

Social Sciences - Event - 20.06.2022
’I never knew there were people like me at university’
Surveys of participants in the -Native Schools- project show that knowledge communication may be a key to overcoming social injustice, inequality and exclusion. In particular, direct interactions between researchers and disadvantaged groups have the potential to increase knowledge about and enthusiasm for research in all parts of society.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.06.2022
Protein changes in the liquor indicate inflammatory processes in the brain
Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases are associated with inflammatory processes in the brain. German researchers have succeeded in identifying a group of proteins in the liquor that could provide information about such inflammatory processes. As so-called biomarkers, the proteins could help to better understand disease processes in the future and to test the effect of potential drugs against brain inflammation.

Materials Science - 17.06.2022
Stimulate light emission and measure temperature with ultrasound
Stimulate light emission and measure temperature with ultrasound
If mechanoluminescent materials are subjected to mechanical stress from outside, they emit visible or invisible light. Such excitation can occur, for example, through buckling or gentle pressure, but also completely contact-free via ultrasound. In this way, the effect can be triggered remotely and light can be brought to places that normally tend to be in the dark - for example, in the human body.

History / Archeology - 17.06.2022
New finds at temple city of Heliopolis
New finds at temple city of Heliopolis
During recently completed excavations in northeastern Cairo, an Egyptian-German excavation team of archaeologists has found important evidence from the history of the temple city of Heliopolis. It includes the foundation of a limestone wall, which was discovered running from north to south about 55 metres west of the still-standing obelisk of Heliopolis.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.06.2022
Cell Biology: Diversity of centrosomes
Cell Biology: Diversity of centrosomes
Scientists from LMU and Helmholtz Munich have gained new insights into the human centrosome, whose malfunction is linked to many neurodevelopmental disorders. The centrosome is the organelle responsible for the organization of the cytoskeleton during cell division, an essential function in organisms from yeast to humans.
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