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Earth Sciences - Physics - 07.02.2023
Asteroid impact in slow motion
Asteroid impact in slow motion
For the first time, researchers have recorded live and in atomic detail what happens to the material in an asteroid impact. The team of Falko Langenhorst from the University of Jena and Hanns-Peter Liermann from DESY simulated an asteroid impact with the mineral quartz in the lab and pursued it in slow motion in a diamond anvil cell, while monitoring it with DESY's X-ray source PETRA III.

Health - Chemistry - 06.02.2023
Tailor-made Metal Complexes for Medical Diagnostics and Therapy
Tailor-made Metal Complexes for Medical Diagnostics and Therapy
Heidelberg chemists study manganese, lutetium, and actinium compounds for potential applications in medicine Tailor-made chemical complexes of certain elements from the group of metals could be suitable for use in a special way in medical imaging as well as potential applications in personalised precision medicine.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 03.02.2023
An exoplanet that could host life
An exoplanet that could host life
Astronomers find rare Earth-mass rocky planet suitable for the search for signs of life A newly discovered exoplanet could be worth searching for signs of life. Analyses by a team led by astronomer Diana Kossakowski of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy describe a planet that orbits its home star, the red dwarf Wolf 1069, in the habitable zone.

Health - 02.02.2023
How Sneaky Fungi Hide From Ants
How Sneaky Fungi Hide From Ants
Scientists from Austria and Germany show that pathogenic fungi are adapting to social health care measures by ants. Not only humans are social, ants are too. Group members are taking care of sick ones by providing collective hygiene measures. This presents germs with a task. They must circumvent the immunity of an individual ant and avoid the group's healthcare.

Environment - 02.02.2023
Tree rows in modern agriculture reduce damage to environment
Tree rows in modern agriculture reduce damage to environment
International team led by Göttingen University compares agroforestry with conventional cultivation "Alley cropping- is the agricultural practice of planting rows - or alleys - of trees in fields of crops. According to a new study by an international, multidisciplinary research team led by the University of Göttingen, this type of land use rapidly leads to significant ecosystem improvements in farmland.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.02.2023
76 % of assessed insect species worldwide not adequately covered by protected areas
76 % of assessed insect species worldwide not adequately covered by protected areas
Insect numbers have been declining over the past decades in many parts of the world. Protected areas could safeguard threatened insects, but a team of researchers led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), and the University of Queensland now found that 76 % of globally assessed insect species are not adequately covered by protected areas worldwide.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.02.2023
Local cacao varieties promise high biodiversity and fine flavours
Local cacao varieties promise high biodiversity and fine flavours
Agroecologists from Göttingen University study their socio-ecological importance in South America In the western Amazon region, cacao has been cultivated since prehistoric times and the area is a valuable resource for genetic diversity of cacao plants. There is growing interest here in switching cultivation from high-yielding but mostly low-quality cacao to indigenous cacao varieties that produce chocolate with particularly fine flavours.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 01.02.2023
Depletion of the ozone layer led to mass extinction
Depletion of the ozone layer led to mass extinction
Palaeobotanists analyse plant fossils 252 million years old 252 million years ago, there occurred the greatest mass extinction in the history of the Earth up to that time: three-quarters of life on land and up to 95 percent of marine species vanished within just a few thousand years. This far-reaching event at the end of the Permian period marked the transition to a new age - that of the dinosaurs.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2023
Cancer research at TUM
Cancer research at TUM
World Cancer Day on February 4, 2023 How does cancer develop? How can we improve diagnoses and therapies? How can we prevent it from occurring in the first place? To answer these questions, TUM and its University Hospital rechts der Isar link the study of medicine with the natural sciences, life sciences, engineering and informatics.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 01.02.2023
The chemistry of mummification - Traces of a global network
The chemistry of mummification - Traces of a global network
Analyzing the residue on vessels in a mummification workshop has given a team of researchers from LMU Munich and the University of fresh insights into how the ancient Egyptians embalmed the bodies of their dead. The archeologists have been able to determine what substances were used for which part of the body.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.02.2023
Browsing Herbivores Increase Savanna Resilience to Droughts
Browsing Herbivores Increase Savanna Resilience to Droughts
Biologist Katja Irob from Freie Universität publishes results of a joint study carried out by German and Namibian researchers in the Journal of Applied Ecology Extreme climate events pose an ever-increasing threat to savannas around the world. However, the ability of these mixed woodland-grassland ecosystems to resist periods of drought can be improved with a higher number of browsing herbivores - i.e., animals such as kudus, springboks, and common elands that feed on woody vegetation.

Materials Science - 31.01.2023
Raw material bark
Raw material bark
Stable boards can be made from a waste product of the wood industry without glue Tree bark may be suitable as a similarly versatile material as wood. A research team at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam has pressed tree bark into boards that have similar mechanical properties to particleboard, but do not contain any adhesive.

Life Sciences - 30.01.2023
The key to hearing development
The key to hearing development
In our inner ear, there are two different types of sensory cells that are responsible for hearing. An MHH research team has now identified the molecular switch for the formation of these inner and outer hair cells and thus found an important building block for the treatment of hearing loss. The inner and outer hair cells develop before birth from a common type of precursor cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.01.2023
Not just mood swings but premenstrual depression
Not just mood swings but premenstrual depression
Researchers find serotonin transporter in the brain increased Scientists led by Julia Sacher from Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences and Osama Sabri from the Leipzig University Hospital have discovered in an elaborate patient study that the transport of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the brain increases in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) shortly before menstruation.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 26.01.2023
Evolutionary Tuning of a Cellular 'Powerhouse'
Evolutionary Tuning of a Cellular ’Powerhouse’
Researchers in Freiburg and Bonn provide the first comprehensive mapping of the protein machineries in the mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell Mitochondria are membrane-enclosed structures found in all cells of higher organisms, where they produce most of the necessary energy ("powerhouses of the cell").

Life Sciences - 26.01.2023
Motile Sperm and Frequent Abortions in Spreading Earthmoss
Motile Sperm and Frequent Abortions in Spreading Earthmoss
Freiburg researchers discover that sperm motility and anchoring of the spore capsule in the spreading earthmoss Physcomitrella are influenced by the auxin transporter PINC. As a component of moors, mosses are important for climate conservation. They are also gaining increasing significance in biotechnology and the manufacture of biopharmaceuticals.

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.01.2023
The death of microorganisms affects the carbon content in the soil
The death of microorganisms affects the carbon content in the soil
Biologists at Freie Universität Berlin Publish Research Results in Nature Geoscience Even microorganisms are not immortal. And the way the tiny creatures die in the soil has an impact on the amount of carbon they leave behind, as microbiologist and ecologist Dr. Tessa Camenzind of Freie Universität Berlin, in collaboration with Johannes Lehmann of Cornell University, New York (USA) and Humboldt Research Award winner at Freie Universität Berlin, and other co-authors have now discovered.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 26.01.2023
Evolutionary tuning of a cellular 'power plant'
Evolutionary tuning of a cellular ’power plant’
Researchers from Freiburg and Bonn succeed in the first comprehensive description of the protein machines in the mitochondria, the power plants of the cell. Mitochondria are membrane-enveloped structures found in all cells of higher organisms, where they produce most of the necessary energy ("power plants of the cell").

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.01.2023
How Microbes Die Influences Soil Carbon Content
How Microbes Die Influences Soil Carbon Content
Biologists at Freie Universität Berlin publish research results in Nature Geoscience Even microorganisms do not live forever. However, the manner in which these tiny soil organisms die has an effect on the amount of carbon they leave behind. These are the latest results of a study carried out by microbiologist and ecologist Dr. Tessa Camenzind from Freie Universität Berlin, together with Humboldt Research Award winner Johannes Lehmann, visiting researcher at Freie Universität Berlin from Cornell University, New York (USA), and their colleagues.

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.01.2023
Cooperation between dolphins and humans
Cooperation between dolphins and humans
A study reveals how cooperative hunting between dolphins and fishers can benefit both species-and why this behavior faces extinction In the city of Laguna on Brazil's southern coast, dolphins and humans have been helping each other hunt for over a century. In the practice, traditional net-casting fishers wait in the lagoon for wild bottlenose dolphins to appear.
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