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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
  • The selection of news is made by the team of myScience.ch. There is no right to be published or automatic publishing.
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Results 21 - 40 of 144.


Physics - 22.12.2021
Thinnest optical diffuser for new applications
Thinnest optical diffuser for new applications
Team of physicists developed novel optical component based on metamaterials of silicon nanoparticles Light Miniaturization of optical components is a challenge in photonics. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Friedrich Schiller University Jena have now succeeded in developing a diffuser, a disk that scatters light, based on silicon nanoparticles.

Health - 21.12.2021
Innovative X-ray imaging shows Covid-19 can cause vascular damage to the heart
Innovative X-ray imaging shows Covid-19 can cause vascular damage to the heart
Interdisciplinary research team from Göttingen University and Hannover Medical School are first to prove this directly An interdisciplinary research team from the University of Göttingen and Hannover Medical School (MHH) has detected significant changes in the heart muscle tissue of people who died from Covid-19.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2021
'The balance is extremely important'
’The balance is extremely important’
When you enter the Institute of Neuroand Behavioural Biology at Badestraße 9 and go up the stairs on the left... what you immediately see are the rows of pictures in the stairwell and the corridors. They look fascinating, in bright vibrant colours - but what they actually show is not apparent to the non-specialist at first glance.

Physics - Innovation - 21.12.2021
Swinging on the quantum level
Swinging on the quantum level
After the "first quantum revolution" - the development of devices such as lasers and the atomic clock - the "second quantum revolution" is currently in full swing. Experts from all over the world are developing fundamentally new technologies based on quantum physics. One key application is quantum communication, where information is written and sent in light.

Materials Science - 21.12.2021
How a floating fern withstands the rain
How a floating fern withstands the rain
The tropical floating fern Salvinia molesta has developed sophisticated structures to allow water to roll off its leaves quickly - even during heavy rainfall. This relieves the pressure on the leaves floating on the water surface, but even more importantly, it keeps the stomata open for air exchange.

Social Sciences - 20.12.2021
How populists’ election results lead to far-right demonstrations
In liberal-leaning municipalities, there is an increased probability of far-right demonstrations in the wake of unexpectedly strong election results by right-wing populists. This is one of the insights from an investigation based on electoral results of the AfD party in Germany. The study reveals a surprise effect on the part of people who previously believed that their attitudes were less socially acceptable.

Life Sciences - 20.12.2021
A special aid to memory
We all know the everyday situation: you go into a supermarket, realise that you've left your shopping list at home and, try you as you might, you can only remember a fraction of what was on it. Forgetfulness is seen as a deficit which makes life more complicated. Anyone who is chronically forgetful is quickly seen as being a bit dotty.

Environment - 17.12.2021
Strategies of the forest during extreme drought
Strategies of the forest during extreme drought
Research team including Göttingen University participates in far-reaching study with analysis of carbon storage How do tropical rainforests and their plants react to extreme drought? Understanding these processes is crucial to making forests more resilient to the increasing risk of drought due to climate change, and will improve the scientists- ability to refine climate models.

Agronomy / Food Science - 16.12.2021
Using videos and farmer-to-farmer learning to make agriculture more sustainable
Using videos and farmer-to-farmer learning to make agriculture more sustainable
International research team led by Göttingen University study training methods in Ethiopia Smallholder family farms shape the agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa. At the same time, they are often affected by declining soil fertility as well as hunger and poverty. Farming practices that increase productivity as well as protect the soil are therefore crucial.

Politics - 15.12.2021
EU citizens want more justice and participation
EU citizens want more justice and participation
What are European citizens' ideal visions of the European Union (EU)- According to an international study undertaken by political scientists from the University of Münster, people across all countries studied primarily support more participation and justice.

Earth Sciences - 15.12.2021
Swaying mountains
Swaying mountains
The Matterhorn appears as an immovable, massive mountain that has towered over the landscape near Zermatt for thousands of years. A study now shows that this impression is wrong. An international research team has proven that the Matterhorn is instead constantly in motion, swaying gently back and forth about once every two seconds.

Environment - Health - 10.12.2021
Real-time, interactive monitoring of forest health
Real-time, interactive monitoring of forest health
Interactive online platform uses satellite images to display status of European forests. The output is based on the greenness of trees. With the latest functionality, users can also view and download data for individual countries and selected time ranges to learn more about the condition of forests.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2021
Surviving 'butterfly disease'
Surviving ’butterfly disease’
The skin is the largest organ of the human body. But what if the skin "disintegrates" at just the slightest touch? This is exactly what happens with Epidermolysis bullosa (EB), sometimes also known by the name 'butterfly disease'. This skin disease is based on genetic defects and, because there is no cure, it can be fatal, often even in young patients.

Astronomy / Space Science - 10.12.2021
Infant stars identified at the centre of our galaxy
Infant stars identified at the centre of our galaxy
What was previously identified as a gas and dust cloud at the centre of our galaxy actually consists of three very young stars. That is the result of a new study led by scientists from the University of Cologne's Institute of Astrophysics. The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) - a telescope with mirror diameters of 8.20 metres on the summit of Cerro Paranal in Chile - provided the data for the study, which has appeared in The Astrophysical Journal .

Life Sciences - Health - 10.12.2021
Learning and protecting itself: how the brain adapts
Learning and protecting itself: how the brain adapts
Göttingen researchers investigate the effect of certain enzymes in the healthy and diseased brain The brain is a remarkably complex and adaptable organ. However, adaptability decreases with age: as new connections between nerve cells in the brain form less easily, the brain's plasticity decreases. If there is an injury to the central nervous system such as after a stroke, the brain needs to compensate for this by reorganising itself.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 09.12.2021
The tetra-neutron - a miniature neutron star
The tetra-neutron - a miniature neutron star
While all atomic nuclei except hydrogen are composed of protons and neutrons, physicists have been searching for a particle consisting of two, three or four neutrons for over half a century. Experiments by a team of physicists of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) at the accelerator laboratory on the Garching research campus now indicate that a particle comprising four bound neutrons may well exist.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.12.2021
Defense or repair: How immune cells are controlled during wound healing
A Cologne-based research team has discovered that the metabolism of mitochondria, the energy suppliers of cells, in macrophages coordinate wound healing to a significant degree. Macrophages belong to the white blood cells and are also known as scavenger cells.Sabine Eming and her collaborators and colleagues at the CECAD Cluster of Excellence for Aging Research at the University of Cologne showed that wound macrophages undergo different metabolic programs during tissue repair, which are required to support the successive phases for skin reconstruction after injury.

Health - 08.12.2021
Making childbirth safer in Indonesia
Making childbirth safer in Indonesia
Study led by Göttingen and Syiah Kuala Universities finds Safe Childbirth Checklist contributes to improved maternal and neonatal healthcare Every year, 295,000 maternal deaths, 2 million stillbirths, and 2.5 million neonatal deaths occur worldwide. Improved quality of care could prevent the majority of those deaths.

Life Sciences - 07.12.2021
How well are alternative feedstuffs received by the end consumer?
Researchers at the University of Göttingen examine the effect of providing information Despite shifts towards vegan and vegetarian diets in Western cultures, demand for animal protein persists. Alternative protein sources are required to nourish the growing world population without compromising on sustainability.

Life Sciences - Physics - 06.12.2021
Researchers examine neurotoxin from a Black Widow
Researchers examine neurotoxin from a Black Widow
Phobias are often irrational by nature - especially in the case of spiders, as these creatures are usually more afraid of humans than vice-versa. But: some species are a force to be reckoned with - for example, the Latrodectus spider, more commonly known as the Black Widow. It catches its prey by using venom - to be precise, latrotoxins (LaTXs), a subclass of neurotoxins, or nerve poisons.