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Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 28.07.2020
How stony-iron meteorites form
How stony-iron meteorites form
SAPHiR multi-anvil press solves mystery of the solar system Meteorites give us insight into the early development of the solar system. Using the SAPHiR instrument at the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a scientific team has for the first time simulated the formation of a class of stony-iron meteorites, so-called pallasites, on a purely experimental basis.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.07.2020
Largest stony meteorite of Germany found: Researchers at the University of Münster confirm
Largest stony meteorite of Germany found: Researchers at the University of Münster confirm
Even in science, chance sometimes produces more thrilling discoveries that the most ambitious plans. In 1989, a homeowner was digging a cable trench on his property in Blaubeuren, in the German region of Swabia, when his spade hit a rock measuring 28 by 25 by 20 centimetres. Upon lifting it half a metre to the surface, he found that it was remarkably heavy.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 25.06.2020
Super-Earths discovered orbiting nearby red dwarf
Super-Earths discovered orbiting nearby red dwarf
International researchers led by University of Göttingen find multiple planet system orbiting Gliese 887 The nearest exoplanets to us provide the best opportunities for detailed study, including searching for evidence of life outside the Solar System. In research led by the University of Göttingen, the RedDots team of astronomers has detected a system of super-Earth planets orbiting the nearby star Gliese 887, the brightest red dwarf star in the sky.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.06.2020
Surprising Signal in the XENON1T Dark Matter Experiment
Surprising Signal in the XENON1T Dark Matter Experiment
Scientists from the international XENON collaboration under participation of the University of Münster announced today that data from their XENON1T, the world's most sensitive dark matter experiment, show a surprising excess of events. The scientists do not claim to have found dark matter. Instead, they say to have observed an unexpected rate of events, the source of which is not yet fully understood.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 16.06.2020
If there is life out there, can we detect it?
Scientists at Freie Universität Berlin publish two experimental studies in journal Astrobiology No 101/2020 from Jun 16, 2020 Instruments on-board future space missions are capable of detecting amino acids, fatty acids, and peptides, and even identify ongoing biological processes on ocean moons in our Solar System.

Astronomy / Space Science - 15.05.2020
Like Thunder Without Lightning
Like Thunder Without Lightning
Mergers between black holes and neutron stars in dense star clusters are quite unlike those that form in isolated regions where stars are few. Their associated features could be crucial to the study of gravitational waves and their source. Dr Manuel Arca Sedda of the Institute for Astronomical Computing at Heidelberg University came to this conclusion in a study that used computer simulations.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 17.02.2020
First research results on the
First research results on the "spectacular meteorite fall" of Flensburg
Planetologists from Münster University show that the meteorite contains minerals that formed under the presence of water on small planetesimals in the early history of our solar system. A fireball in the sky, accompanied by a bang, amazed hundreds of eyewitnesses in northern Germany in mid-September last year.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 08.01.2020
New Hubble constant measurement using cosmic lenses
New Hubble constant measurement using cosmic lenses
New measurement of the universe's expansion rate strengthens call for new physics Using cosmic lenses an international team of astrophysicists determined the universe's expansion rate, completely independent of any previous method. The researchers' result further strengthens a troubling discrepancy between the expansion rate calculated from measurements of the local universe and the rate as predicted from background radiation of the early universe.

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