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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
  • The selection of news is made by the team of myScience.ch. There is no right to be published or automatic publishing.
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Results 21 - 40 of 356.


Life Sciences - 24.11.2022
Vegetation-free patches encourage ground-nesting wild bees
Vegetation-free patches encourage ground-nesting wild bees
Göttingen researchers investigate ways to improve conservation management of wild bees on calcareous grasslands Relatively little is known about the nesting requirements of ground-nesting wild bees, although nesting sites are of central importance for most wild bee species. There are almost 600 wild bee species in Germany and 75 per cent nest in the soil.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.11.2022
Catching the dynamic Coronal Web
Catching the dynamic Coronal Web
Researchers discover an important clue as to what mechanism drives the solar wind Using observational data from the U.S. weather satellites GOES, a team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany has taken an important step toward unlocking one of the Sun-s most persevering secrets: How does our star launch the particles constituting the solar wind into space? The data provide a unique view of a key region in the solar corona to which researchers have had little access so far.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.11.2022
Protein Spheres Protect the Genome of Cancer Cells
Protein Spheres Protect the Genome of Cancer Cells
Hollow spheres made of MYC proteins open new doors in cancer research. Würzburg scientists have discovered them and report about this breakthrough in the journal "Nature". MYC genes and their proteins play a central role in the emergence and development of almost all cancers. They drive the uncontrolled growth and altered metabolism of tumour cells.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 23.11.2022
A sharp look into the nucleus of a quasar
A sharp look into the nucleus of a quasar
International team observes the innermost structure of the jet of 3C 273 At the core of almost every galaxy is a supermassive black hole. But there are many different types. Quasars, for example, are one of the brightest and most active varieties of galactic centers. An international group, including researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, presents new observations of the first quasar ever identified.

Environment - 23.11.2022
Low-cost sensor records the level of rivers
Low-cost sensor records the level of rivers
Measurement method developed at the University of Bonn could be suitable for flood warning systems Researchers at the University of Bonn have developed a method that allows the water level of rivers to be monitored around the clock. The cost-effective sensor is for instance suitable for area-wide flood warning systems.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.11.2022
Unexpected cognitive deteriorations in epilepsy
Unexpected cognitive deteriorations in epilepsy
Study by the University of Bonn: Surgical tissue indicates rare secondary disease In severe epilepsies, surgical intervention is often the only remedy - usually with great success. While neuropsychological performance can recover in the long term after successful surgery, on rare occasions, unexpected declines in cognitive performance occur.

Physics - Chemistry - 22.11.2022
Elusive carbonic acid: it really exists!
Elusive carbonic acid: it really exists!
Neutrons from FRM II expose crystal structure of carbonic acid The existence of carbonic acid has long been the subject of debate: theoretically real, but practically impossible to detect. That is because the compound decomposes at the Earth's surface. A German-Chinese team of researchers working at the FRM II Research Neutron Source at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now made the crystalline structure of carbonic acid molecules visible for the first time.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.11.2022
Zombie viruses on a hijacking trip
Zombie viruses on a hijacking trip
Ancient dormant sequences in the genome impact embryonic development in unexpected ways The mammalian genome contains retroviral sequences that are in an undead but mostly "harmless" state. An international research team recently discovered how some of these retroviral gene fragments affect embryonic cells if they are unleashed.

Environment - 21.11.2022
Ice Age temperatures and precipitation reconstructed from earthworm granules
Ice Age temperatures and precipitation reconstructed from earthworm granules
New method for determination of past climate data on land applied comparatively for the first time / Ice Age summers in Central Europe were at times warmer than previously known Scientists from an international research project led by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have applied a new method to reconstruct past climate.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2022
Poor diet harms blood vessels
Poor diet harms blood vessels
Over the last few decades, the number of obesity sufferers has continued to increase and is now one of the leading causes of death worldwide - 650 million adults are classified as obese. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines obesity as the accumulation of excess fat in the body, which poses risks to healthy living.

Physics - Electroengineering - 21.11.2022
Long-range information transport in antiferromagnets
Long-range information transport in antiferromagnets
Physicists at JGU discovered: Antiferromagnets are suitable for transporting spin waves over long distances Smaller, faster, more powerful: The demands on microelectronic devices are high and continue to rise. However, if chips, processors and the like are based on electric current, there are limits to miniaturization.

Physics - Innovation - 21.11.2022
Researchers control individual light quanta at very high speed
Researchers control individual light quanta at very high speed
A team of German and Spanish researchers from Valencia, Münster, Augsburg, Berlin and Munich have succeeded in controlling individual light quanta to an extremely high degree of precision. In the "Nature Communications" journal, the researchers report how, by means of a soundwave, they switch individual photons on a chip back and forth between two outputs at gigahertz frequencies.

Life Sciences - Linguistics / Literature - 21.11.2022
Genes and tongues are not always tied together
Genes and tongues are not always tied together
A global database helps explore the complex history of our genes and languages Does the history of our languages match the history of our genes? Charles Darwin thought yes, others said no. An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, the University of Zurich and Harvard University has put together GeLaTo, a global database linking linguistic and genetic data.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 21.11.2022
Hominins were cooking fish already in the early Paleolithic period about 780,000 years ago
Hominins were cooking fish already in the early Paleolithic period about 780,000 years ago
Ancient fish teeth discovered at the archaeological site of Gesher Benot Ya'aqov in Israel provide earliest evidence of our prehistoric ancestors deliberately cooking foodstuff Nutrition and the ability to prepare foodstuffs helped facilitate the evolution of the human species. Considered particularly relevant to the development of the genus Homo in this context are the processes of cooking.

Astronomy / Space Science - 18.11.2022
Black holes in eccentric orbit
Black holes in eccentric orbit
A research team from Jena and Turin (Italy) has reconstructed the origin of an unusual gravitational wave signal. As the researchers write in the current issue of the scientific journal "Nature Astronomy", the signal GW190521 may result from the merger of two massive black holes that captured each other in their gravitational field and then collided while spinning around each other in a rapid, eccentric motion (DOI: 10.1038/s41550'022 -01813-w).

Health - Pharmacology - 18.11.2022
PETN reduces risk of preterm birth and hypertension in pregnancy
PETN reduces risk of preterm birth and hypertension in pregnancy
In about one in twenty pregnant women, ultrasound Doppler measurement in mid-pregnancy reveals that the uterus and placenta are not sufficiently supplied with blood. There is then a risk that the baby will not be adequately supplied by the mother's body and will not develop in time. In the worst case, the baby may die in the womb before birth.

Chemistry - Physics - 17.11.2022
Problem solved in organic chemistry
Problem solved in organic chemistry
In chemicals used in agriculture, as well as in pharmaceuticals and a variety of materials, pyridines are often found as so-called functional units which decisively determine the chemical properties of substances. Pyridines belong to the group of ring-shaped carbon-hydrogen (C'H) compounds ("heterocycles"), and they contain a nitrogen atom (N).

Health - Life Sciences - 17.11.2022
New target for Alzheimer's therapies found
New target for Alzheimer’s therapies found
The protein medin is deposited in the blood vessels of the brains of Alzheimer's patients along with the protein amyloid-β. DZNE Re-searchers have discovered this so-called co-aggregation. They have now published their observation in the renowned journal Na-ture. "Medin has been known for over 20 years, but its influence on diseases was previously underestimated.

Environment - 17.11.2022
Pesticide risks also in nature reserves
Pesticide risks also in nature reserves
The risks pesticides pose to insects and other small animals in waters in protected areas are almost comparable to those in waters outside protected areas - even if the concentrations of pesticides in waters in protected areas are lower. This was found by scientists at the University of Koblenz-Landau in a recent study.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 16.11.2022
Urine reveals our eating habits
Urine reveals our eating habits
We already know that a urine test can establish whether someone has an infection of the urinary tract or has taken illegal drugs. But there are lots more traces to be found in urine - if you know how to read them. Developing and refining techniques to get pointers to a person's eating habits or to harmful substances in their urine is one of the pet projects being pursued by food chemist Prof. Hans-Ulrich Humpf and his working group at the University of Münster.