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Computer Science - Health - 19.08.2022
First completely robot-supported microsurgical operations performed
First completely robot-supported microsurgical operations performed
Münster surgeons use new operating method for the first time anywhere in the world / Research at Münster University strengthens medical digitalisation in the operating theatre It is a great success for robotic microsurgery not only in Münster but worldwide - both for medicine and for science: a team led by scientists Dr. Maximilian Kückelhaus and Prof. Tobias Hirsch from the Centre for Musculoskeletal Medicine at the University of Münster has carried out the first completely robot-supported microsurgical operations on humans.

Materials Science - Innovation - 09.08.2022
New Battery Line for Processing of Lithium Metal at MEET Battery Research Center
New Battery Line for Processing of Lithium Metal at MEET Battery Research Center
Lithium metal and solid-state batteries are considered as batteries of the future. While scientists continue to develop the technology of the different battery types, their production still involves numerous challenges. A new production line at MEET Battery Research Center at the University of Münster now enables cell construction of these new battery types and expands production research at the site.

Life Sciences - 08.08.2022
How calcium ions get into the cellular power stations of plants
How calcium ions get into the cellular power stations of plants
Calcium is a very special nutrient. In the cells of most living beings calcium ions function as so-called second messengers to transmit important signals. The same applies equally to animal, plant and fungal cells.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 04.07.2022
On the way to cell-type materials
On the way to cell-type materials
Molecular machines control a sizeable number of fundamental processes in nature. Embedded in a cellular environment, these processes play a central role in the intracellular and intercellular transportation of molecules, as well as in muscle contraction in humans and animals. In order for the entire organism to function, a well-defined orientation and arrangement of the molecular machines is essential.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded
Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded
Binge eating bye bye: Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded A group of researchers has found a completely new approach to treating eating disorders. The scientists have demonstrated that a group of nerve cells in the hypothalamus (known as AgRP, agouti-related peptide neurons) control the release of endogenous lysophospholipids, which in turn control the excitability of nerve cells in the cerebral cortex, stimulating food intake.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 21.06.2022
Using light to activate mRNA: Biochemists use new tool to control mRNA by means of light
Using light to activate mRNA: Biochemists use new tool to control mRNA by means of light
DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is a long chain of molecules composed of many individual components, and it forms the basis of life on Earth. The function of DNA is to store all genetic information. The translation of this genetic information into proteins - which an organism needs to function, develop and reproduce - takes place via mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid).

Chemistry - 13.06.2022
Chemists develop new multi-component reaction
Chemists develop new multi-component reaction
More environmentally friendly approach produces complex molecular structures in one step / Ketyl radicals "tamed" by photocatalysis A more sustainable use of chemical resources is part of the United Nations' Agenda 2030. Synthetic chemists are therefore working to design and carry out efficient syntheses.

Earth Sciences - 27.05.2022
Origins of carbonatite magma revealed
Origins of carbonatite magma revealed
Carbonatite rocks are economically important. The many hundreds of known carbonatite deposits on all continents are important repositories of rare-earth metals such as lanthanum, cerium and neodymium. These are used in many key technologies, including smartphones, plasma and LCD screens, as well as in radiology for medical diagnoses, in generators in wind turbines, and in electric motors.

Chemistry - Research Management - 25.05.2022
Chemists use light energy to produce small molecular rings
In the search for new active agents in medicine, molecules whose atoms are linked in rings are becoming increasingly important. Such ring systems have particularly suitable properties for producing such active agents and they are driving the development of innovative treatments for malignant tumours, as well as for neurodegenerative and infectious diseases.

Earth Sciences - 25.05.2022
Formation of carbonatite magmas decrypted
Formation of carbonatite magmas decrypted
Carbonatite rocks are economically important: The hundreds of known fossil carbonatite deposits on all continents are important storage sites for rare earth metals such as lanthanum, cerium, and neodymium. They are used in many key technologies, including smartphones, plasma and LCD screens, medical diagnostic radiology, wind turbine generators, and electric motors.

Physics - Innovation - 11.05.2022
Physicists study optically induced quantum dynamics in single-photon emitters
Physicists study optically induced quantum dynamics in single-photon emitters
For tomorrow's quantum technologies: hexagonal boron nitride under the magnifying glass / findings published in -Optica- Quantum technologies are a seminal field of research, especially in relation to their application in communication and computing. In particular, the so-called single-photon emitters - materials that emit single light quanta in quick sequence - are an important building block for such applications.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.05.2022
Animal research: influence of experimenters on results less strong than expected
Animal research: influence of experimenters on results less strong than expected
For more than ten years now, scientists have been discussing the so-called reproducibility crisis: often, scientific findings cannot be reproduced at a later time and/or in other laboratories, although the studies are carried out under highly standardised conditions. Thereby, standardisation includes for example the use of genetically identical animals, keeping the animals in identically equipped cages, and carrying out the experiments in always the same way.

Life Sciences - 05.05.2022
Research team decodes human genome
Research team decodes human genome
"A big puzzle": How an international consortium has now completely decoded the human genome The human genome is like a puzzle - but a difficult one to solve: This puzzle has more than three billion pieces. And as if that were not challenging enough, the puzzle is made even more confusing by similar pieces as well as patterns that repeat themselves.

Life Sciences - 31.03.2022
Fruit flies adapt activity to 'white nights'
Fruit flies adapt activity to ’white nights’
Evolution takes place constantly, everywhere in nature. Nevertheless, it is always exciting for biologists to observe evolution "in real time". One such opportunity for observation is currently being presented by the internal clock, i.e. the innate sleep-wake rhythm, of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster .

Materials Science - Chemistry - 24.03.2022
MEET Team presents Toolbox for Analysis of End-of-Life-Batteries
MEET Team presents Toolbox for Analysis of End-of-Life-Batteries
Compared to laboratory cells or aged but still intact commercial cells, shredded battery materials represent an even more complex sample. Active materials of both electrodes, inactive materials and electrolyte residues cannot be easily analysed separately.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.03.2022
Chemists discover new reactivity of strained molecules
Chemists discover new reactivity of strained molecules
In synthetic organic chemistry, so-called cycloadditions are a particularly important class of reactions. With this type of reaction, ring-shaped molecules can be constructed simply and efficiently by joining ("adding") two compounds that each contain double bonds. A team led by Frank Glorius from the University of Münster has now succeeded in performing an unconventional cycloaddition in which a carbon-carbon double bond reacts with a carbon-carbon single bond.

Life Sciences - Research Management - 18.03.2022
New findings on the internal clock of the fruit fly
New findings on the internal clock of the fruit fly
Light as a regulator: Team of researchers demonstrates role of transport proteins in the synchronisation of circadian rhythms Most living organisms have an internal clock which, among other things, controls the sleep-wake rhythm. The internal rhythm lasts approximately one day ("circadian"), i.e. about 24 hours, and is regulated by means of various "clock genes".

Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.03.2022
In search of pure quartz
In search of pure quartz
A small heap of very fine white quartz sand glistens in the palm of Prof. Ralf Hetzel's hand. The grains of sand allow him to look deep into the past. To be precise, the cosmogenic nuclide Beryllium-10 (10Be) does. Such nuclides are produced by cosmic radiation in solid rock.

Physics - 11.03.2022
Acoustic propulsion of nanomachines depends on their orientation
Acoustic propulsion of nanomachines depends on their orientation
For the first time, physicists simulate the propulsion of freely orientable nanoparticles by travelling ultrasound waves / Study published in -ACS Nano- Microscopically tiny nanomachines which move like submarines with their own propulsion - for example in the human body, where they transport active agents and release them at a target: What sounds like science fiction has, over the past 20 years, become an ever more rapidly growing field of research.

Politics - 09.02.2022
Large majority of citizens trust science
Large majority of citizens trust science
The Corona pandemic has not only impinged on daily life around the world for around two years now - it is increasingly shifting science and research into the focus of public debate. One aspect is the trust people have in the work done by scientists. A team of researchers led by Prof. Rainer Bromme, a psychologist at the University of Münster, now have published a study, which concludes that science has so far passed the pandemic stress test of public trust in science.