news

News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
  • The selection of news is made by the team of myScience.ch. There is no right to be published or automatic publishing.
  •  RSS Feeds (Add this page to your bookmarks)
« BACK

Max Plank Society


Results 61 - 80 of 106.


Physics - Chemistry - 28.07.2022
A nanokelvin microwave freezer for molecules
A nanokelvin microwave freezer for molecules
A new method to cool gases of polar molecules to near absolute zero paves the way for studying quantum effects of exotic forms of matter Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have developed a novel cooling technique for molecular gases. It makes it possible to cool polar molecules down to a few nanokelvin.

Astronomy / Space Science - 28.07.2022
Galaxies behind a gravitational magnifier
Galaxies behind a gravitational magnifier
The James Webb Telescope reveals highly distant objects Using the first science image released by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) this month, an international team of scientists led by the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics has built an improved model for the mass distribution of the galaxy cluster SMACS J0723.

Life Sciences - 28.07.2022
Pollination by Crustaceans
Pollination by Crustaceans
Bee of the sea: A small marine isopod aids in pollinating red algae Until recently, pollination was thought to be exclusive to land plants. An international team of researchers has now discovered that small crustaceans improve the reproduction rate of red algae by transporting the sperm from the male to the female algae.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.07.2022
Preparing for the World's biggest radio telescope
Preparing for the World’s biggest radio telescope
Astronomers simulate physical processes in the interstellar medium of galaxies at "Cosmic Noon" for future SKAO observations An international team of researchers has demonstrated that the Square Kilometre Array Observatory (SKAO) is capable of detecting radio emissions from normal spiral galaxies in the early universe.

Life Sciences - 19.07.2022
It’s all about the sausage
Choosing the right proteins can improve the mouthfeel of vegetarian sausages The right crack of the sausage is, not least, a matter of physics. A team from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz has investigated how the properties of plant proteins influence the mouthfeel of vegetarian and vegan sausages.

Psychology - 15.07.2022
Children compensate for lack of concentration through creativity
Children compensate for lack of concentration through creativity
Study shows that children find their own solutions thanks to broad focus Children have a hard time with concentration tasks, but are often good at discovering hidden "tricks" to make the task easier. Spontaneous strategy changes help them to do this, according to a study on learning behavior in children by the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin.

Life Sciences - 13.07.2022
A brain network for social attraction
A brain network for social attraction
Specialized nerve cells in the zebrafish visual system enable recognition of conspecifics Humans are famously social animals. But they are not alone in their tendency to team up with other individuals of the same species (conspecifics) to reach their goals. In fact, herds of mammals, flocks of birds, or shoals of fish are abundantly observed in nature.

Computer Science - 06.07.2022
The future of encryption
The future of encryption
Cryptographic systems that even quantum computers cannot crack will soon be standard in the USA Whenever you visit a website, send an email, or do your online banking in the future, in many cases algorithms developed with the participation of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Security and Privacy in Bochum and the Ruhr University Bochum will be used to protect your data.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 06.07.2022
Biosynthesis of strychnine elucidated
Biosynthesis of strychnine elucidated
Researchers from Jena show how the poison nut tree forms strychnine A research team at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena disclosed the complete biosynthetic pathway for the formation of strychnine in the plant species Strychnos nux-vomica (poison nut). The researchers identified all genes involved in the biosynthesis of strychnine and other metabolites and expressed them in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana .

Physics - 04.07.2022
The Higgs particle turns ten
The Higgs particle turns ten
Detailed insights into the nature of the Higgs boson could help answer big open questions in physics Exactly ten years ago, the Atlas and CMS experiments announced a resounding success: Little less than three years after the launch of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern, the last missing piece in the Standard Model of particle physics had been found: The Higgs boson, a kind of messenger of the Higgs field that in turn gives mass to all matter particles.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 28.06.2022
A sanitizer in the galactic centre region
A sanitizer in the galactic centre region
Many of us have probably already - literally - handled the chemical compound iso-propanol: it can used as an antiseptic, a solvent or a cleaning agent. But this substance is not only found on Earth: researchers led by Arnaud Belloche from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn have now detected the molecule in interstellar space for the first time.

Life Sciences - 23.06.2022
Silence for thought
Silence for thought
Scientists map prominent differences in the neural circuits of mice, monkeys, and human The analysis of the human brain is a central goal of neuroscience. However, for methodological reasons, research has largely focused on model organisms, in particular the mouse. Now, neuroscientists gained novel insights on human neural circuitry using tissue obtained from neurosurgical interventions.

History / Archeology - 22.06.2022
Britains earliest humans
Britains earliest humans
Homo heidelbergensis may have occupied southern Britain between 560,000 and 620,000 years ago Archaeological discoveries made on the outskirts of Canterbury, Kent (England) confirm the presence of early humans in southern Britain between 560,000 and 620,000 years ago. The breakthrough, involving controlled excavations and radiometric dating, comes a century after stone tool artefacts were first uncovered at the site.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.06.2022
A nose for damaged plants and fake perfumes
A nose for damaged plants and fake perfumes
Researchers develop a highly sensitive novel technique capable of detecting chiral molecules within complex gas mixtures The chiral signature of a fragrance can reveal whether a perfume is genuine or fake. Similarly, the chiral signature of the emissions of a plant can provide information on whether the plant is healthy or sick.

Computer Science - Linguistics / Literature - 16.06.2022
Shedding light on linguistic diversity and its evolution
Shedding light on linguistic diversity and its evolution
Linguists and computer scientists collaborate to publish a large global Open Access lexical database Scholars from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany and the University of Auckland in New Zealand have created a new global repository of linguistic data. The project is designed to facilitate new insights into the evolution of words and sounds of the languages spoken across the world today.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 15.06.2022
Origins of the Black Death identified
Multidisciplinary team studied ancient plague genomes The Black Death, the biggest pandemic of our history, was caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and lasted in Europe between the years 1346 and 1353. Despite the pandemic's immense demographic and societal impacts, its origins have long been elusive.

Life Sciences - Environment - 07.06.2022
Copper makes seed pods explode
Copper makes seed pods explode
Researchers identify the genes controlling the mechanical structure of exploding seed pods Plants have evolved numerous strategies to spread their seeds widely. Some scatter their seeds to the wind, while others tempt animals and birds to eat their seed-filled fruits. And a few rare plants - such as the popping cress Cardamine hirsuta - have evolved exploding seed pods that propel their seeds in all directions.

Life Sciences - 02.06.2022
Tobacco hawkmoths always find the right odor
Tobacco hawkmoths always find the right odor
The moths can distinguish crucial from irrelevant odors A research team at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology has discovered how tobacco hawkmoths are able to detect odors that are important to them against a complex olfactory background. By looking at the specific activity patterns that the odors triggered in the moths' brains the researcher showed that the sense of smell enables moths not only to perceive the intense floral odors of nectar sources, but also to find the rather unobtrusive smell of their host plants on which the larvae thrive.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.06.2022
Misperceptions about doctor's trust in Covid-19 vaccines influence vaccination rate
Misperceptions about doctor’s trust in Covid-19 vaccines influence vaccination rate
Informing people about the strong positive consensus among doctors persistently leads to increases in Covid-19 vaccinations How to increase vaccination rates by autumn, without any compulsion is shown by an international research team including the Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance.

Social Sciences - Health - 31.05.2022
Healthy development thanks to older siblings
Healthy development thanks to older siblings
If expectant mothers are exposed to stress their child can develop behavioural problems - but this is less often the case for children with siblings During the first years of their lives, children develop the cognitive, social and emotional skills that will provide the foundations for their lifelong health and achievements.