"The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi Codices"

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International Conference from July 20 to 22 in Berlin on Ancient Jewish and Early Christian Writing

No 194/2018 from Jul 18, 2018

An international conference in Berlin between July 20 and 22, 2018, will focus on the Jewish Dead Sea Scrolls (2nd and 1st centuries BC) and the early Christian Nag Hammadi Codices (4th and 5 centuries AD). The conference is being organized by Dr. Dylan M. Burns of the Department of History and Cultural Studies, Freie Universität Berlin, Prof. Matthew Goff of Florida State University, and Jens Schröter of Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. The conference language will be English. To attend, please contact Prof. Matthew Goff at mgoff [at] fsu (p) edu or Dr. Dylan M. Burns at dylan.burns [at] fu-berlin (p) de.

The purpose of the conference is to explore different disciplines of biblical and early Christian studies as well as ancient Judaism as part of the research on the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi Codices. According to the researchers, in the texts of the Nag Hammadi writings, there are references to Jewish scriptural traditions. As well, Christian texts are necessary to understand the development of Judaism. Accordingly, interdisciplinary approaches could contribute to a better overall understanding of the works in both traditions.

The Dead Sea Scrolls, which contain more than 800 texts, were found in 1947 in rock caves west of the Dead Sea. They include some of the oldest known biblical texts. The texts were written mainly in Hebrew. The Nag Hammadi Codices is a collection of early Christian Gnostic texts, mostly translated from Greek into Coptic, originally written between the 2nd and 4th centuries AD. The Coptic Codices themselves are dated to the 4th and 5th centuries AD. They were found in December 1945 near the Egyptian city of Nag Hammadi.

Time and Location

  • " The Dead Sea Scrolls and The Nag Hammadi Codices "
  • Friday, July 20, and Saturday, July 21, between 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
  • Sunday, July 22, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Department of Religion, Burgstraße 26, 10178 Berlin, Room 206

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