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Results 61 - 64 of 64.


Environment - Life Sciences - 30.01.2020
Biological diversity as a factor of production
Biological diversity as a factor of production
Relationship between the economic value of our ecosystems and biodiversity Can the biodiversity of ecosystems be considered a factor of production? A group of researchers under the direction of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are studying the economic benefits that farmers and foresters can obtain by focusing on several species instead of just one.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 22.01.2020
Digital Fertilization
Digital Fertilization
Algorithms and sensors for sustainable and future-proof agriculture European Union Directives stipulate a reduction in nitrate levels in groundwater. Digital techniques developed by researchers at the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan under the aegis of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have proved useful in achieving this goal.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.01.2020
Cyanobacteria produce methane
Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, are among the most common organisms on Earth and are notorious for forming toxins. A recent study has now shown for the first time that these bacteria produce relevant amounts of methane in oceans, inland waters, and on land. In the course of climate change, increasing blue-green algae blooms will most likely amplify the release of methane into the atmosphere, according to scientists from the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and Heidelberg University of Heidelberg who carried out the research.

Environment - 09.01.2020
Using sea-level rise to define climate targets
Using sea-level rise to define climate targets
One major consequence of global warming is the rising sea level. A study conducted at Universität Hamburg's Cluster of Excellence for climate research CLICCS now shows: if we assume that sea-level rise is the most critical effect of climate change, then it is not only more sensible, but also less expensive, to set a maximum limit for sea-level rise that corresponds to the two-degree target, rather than a temperature-based target.