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Life Sciences - 09.11.2023
Ageing cells
Ageing cells
Looking around us, we can see that people age at different rates. But what about inside? Do all cells age in the same way? And does the location of a cell in the organ make a difference to the ageing process? Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne and CECAD Excellence Cluster for Ageing Research have now shown in the liver of mice that liver cells age differently depending on where they are located in the organ.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.11.2023
A Potential Target for New Anti-Cancer Agents
A Potential Target for New Anti-Cancer Agents
MYC proteins play an important role in many types of cancer. A research team at the University of Würzburg has now succeeded in indirectly influencing these proteins - with clear consequences for the tumor. MYC family genes are essential for the human organism. According to current knowledge, they regulate the expression of most cellular genes.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.11.2023
Protein stock for the beginning of a new life
Protein stock for the beginning of a new life
Cytoplasmic lattices in the egg cell supply the early embryo as protein storage sites When mammals have offspring, they invest a lot. Unlike fish or frogs, the embryo cannot develop on its own. It has to implant in the uterus, where it is supplied with everything it needs to survive. Until this happens, the egg cell nourishes the early embryo.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.11.2023
Preventing the Exhaustion of T Cells
Preventing the Exhaustion of T Cells
In the immune system's fight against cancer and infections, the T cells often lose their power. The team of Würzburg immunologist Martin Vaeth has found a possible explanation for this phenomenon. In the immune system, chronic infections and the defence against tumors often lead to the phenomenon of T cell exhaustion: In this process, the T lymphocytes gradually lose their function, which impairs their responses against cancer and infections.

Life Sciences - Research Management - 02.11.2023
How Organs of Male and Female Mammals Differ
Researchers from Heidelberg and London decode genetic programmes that underlie the development of sex-specific characteristics of mammalian organs The development of sex-specific characteristics is frequently seen in mammals. These characteristics stem from the activation of corresponding genetic programmes that until now have been largely undescribed by the scientific community.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.11.2023
First high-resolution image of thick filaments of muscle cells
First high-resolution image of thick filaments of muscle cells
An international team, led by Stefan Raunser, Director at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund, in collaboration with Mathias Gautel at King's College London, has successfully obtained the world's first high-resolution 3D image of the thick filament in its natural cellular environment, utilizing a cutting-edge technique known as electron cryo-tomography.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.10.2023
How to protect biocatalysts from oxygen
How to protect biocatalysts from oxygen
Selective genetic channel modifications can protect hydrogen-producing enzymes from harmful oxygen. There are high hopes for hydrogen as the key to the energy transition. A specific enzyme group found in algae and in bacteria can produce molecular hydrogen simply by catalyzing protons and electrons.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 27.10.2023
Global Distribution of Predatory Crustacean
Global Distribution of Predatory Crustacean
A research team led by the Department of Biology at Éniversität Hamburg has discovered, for the first time, the predatory amphipod Rhachotropis abyssalis in 3 different oceans up to 20,000 kilometers apart. In each case, the animals live at depths of more than 3 kilometers. The findings were published in the journal Scientific Reports .

Life Sciences - Health - 27.10.2023
Possible cause of male infertility
Possible cause of male infertility
Mature spermatozoa are characterized by an head, midpiece and a long tail for locomotion. Now, researchers from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the Transdisciplinary Research Area "Life & Health" at the University of Bonn have found that a loss of the structural protein ACTL7B blocks spermatogenesis in male mice.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.10.2023
How social media can contribute to species conservation
How social media can contribute to species conservation
Photos of plant and animal species that are posted on social media can help protect biodiversity, especially in tropical regions. This is the conclusion of a team of researchers led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (FSU), and the University of Queensland (UQ).

Life Sciences - Psychology - 26.10.2023
The ego-consciousness of the feathered fowl?
The ego-consciousness of the feathered fowl?
A study by researchers at the Universities of Bonn and Bochum suggests that roosters might recognize themselves in the mirror. Scrape, cluck, lay eggs - that's it? Anyone involved in chicken farming knows that the animals are capable of much more. Researchers at the Universities of Bonn and Bochum, together with the MSH Medical School Hamburg, have found evidence that roosters could recognize themselves in a mirror.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 26.10.2023
Membrane Transporter Ensures Mobility of Sperm Cells
Membrane Transporter Ensures Mobility of Sperm Cells
Newly discovered mechanism contributes to a better understanding of molecular foundations of fertility Special proteins - known as membrane transporters - are of key importance for the mobility of sperm cells. A research team from the Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center (BZH) headed by Cristina Paulino has, with the aid of cryo-electron microscopy, for the first time succeeded in decoding the structure of such a transporter and its mechanism.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.10.2023
Collective intelligence makes fewer diagnostic errors
Collective intelligence makes fewer diagnostic errors
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, the Institute for Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology developed a collective intelligence approach to increase the accuracy of medical diagnoses. An estimated 250,000 people die from preventable medical errors in the U.S. each year.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.10.2023
Genomic Stability: A Double-Edged Sword for Sharks
Genomic Stability: A Double-Edged Sword for Sharks
Sharks have existed for millions of years, rarely develop cancer, and react sensitively to ecological changes. An international study led by Würzburg scientists shows that one explanation lies in the fish's genes. Sharks have been populating the oceans for about 400 to 500 million years. While our planet and many of its inhabitants have undergone massive changes several times during this period, this basal group of vertebrates has remained somewhat constant.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 23.10.2023
Adaptive optical neural network connects thousands of artificial neurons
Adaptive optical neural network connects thousands of artificial neurons
International team of researchers develops photonic processor with adaptive neural connectivity Modern computer models - for example for complex, potent AI applications - push traditional digital computer processes to their limits. New types of computing architecture, which emulate the working principles of biological neural networks, hold the promise of faster, more energy-efficient data processing.

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.10.2023
Sex or regeneration
Sex or regeneration
Why are so few species able to regenerate damaged or missing body parts, even though regeneration might seem an obvious survival advantage? Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences in Göttingen, Germany, and colleagues have now found a possible explanation in planarian flatworms.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.10.2023
Cardiac regeneration becomes possible
In mice reprogramming of energy metabolism restores cardiac function after infarction   After birth, the human heart loses its regenerative capacity almost completely. Damage to the heart muscle, e.g. due to a heart attack, therefore usually leads to a permanent loss of function in adults.

Life Sciences - 19.10.2023
Researchers design a pulsing nanomotor
Researchers design a pulsing nanomotor
This machine developed at the University of Bonn measures just one ten-thousandth of a millimeter An international team of scientists headed by the University of Bonn has developed a novel type of nanomotor. It is driven by a clever mechanism and can perform pulsing movements. The researchers are now planning to fit it with a coupling and install it as a drive in complex machines.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.10.2023
AI Models Identify Biodiversity in Tropical Rainforests
Animal sounds are a very good indicator of biodiversity in tropical reforestation areas. Researchers led by Würzburg Professor Jörg Müller demonstrate this by using sound recordings and AI models. Tropical forests are among the most important habitats on our planet. They are characterised by extremely high species diversity and play an eminent role in the global carbon cycle and the world climate.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.10.2023
With a Proton Pump to More Growth
With a Proton Pump to More Growth
An international research team with participation from Würzburg has discovered how algae compensate for nutrient deficiencies. Their discovery could help counteract the negative effects of climate change. One of the building blocks of ocean life can adapt to cope with the effects of climate change, according to new research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA).



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