news

news

News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
  • The selection of news is made by the team of myScience.ch. There is no right to be published or automatic publishing.
  •  RSS Feeds (Add this page to your bookmarks)
« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 681 - 700 of 775.


Life Sciences - Health - 06.05.2016
How Fish Can Regenerate Eye Injuries at the Cellular Level
How Fish Can Regenerate Eye Injuries at the Cellular Level
Confocal microscopy image of a section through the medaka fish retina. Single Müller glia and photoreceptor cells are labelled in different colours by a genetic system (red, green, yellow). Atoh7 expression in Müller glia cells leads a regeneration response in the absence of injury, including expansion of the cell soma and neurogenic cluster formation.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 04.05.2016
Werner Siemens Foundation fosters synthetic biotechnology
Werner Siemens Foundation fosters synthetic biotechnology
Campus news With its donation of 11.5 million euro, the Werner Siemens Foundation has facilitated the launch of the teaching and research domain Synthetic Biotechnology at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). This gives the new TUM School of Bioengineering (MSB) a strong accent as an Integrative Research Center.

Physics - Life Sciences - 29.04.2016
Live is motion
LMU physicists have developed a way to distinguish the random motions of particles in non-living molecular systems from the motility of active living matter. The method affords new insights into fundamental biological processes. Any system in thermodynamic equilibrium is known to satisfy perfectly balanced forward and backward transitions between any two states.

Life Sciences - Physics - 27.04.2016
Closing the ring
How bacterial cells divide in two is not fully understood. LMU physicists now show that, at high concentrations, a crucial protein can assemble into ring-shaped filaments that constrict the cell, giving rise to two daughter cells. Above a certain threshold particle density (subunit concentration), the rotational movement of, and collisions between, the curved polymers lead to the formation of clustered ring-like structures.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 18.04.2016
Predicting Cell Behaviour with a Mathematical Model
Predicting Cell Behaviour with a Mathematical Model
Scientists from Heidelberg University have developed a novel mathematical model to explore cellular processes: with the corresponding software, they now are able to simulate how large collections of cells behave on given geometrical structures. The software supports the evaluation of microscope-based observations of cell behaviour on micropatterned substrates.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 18.04.2016
Mechanics of the cell
Mechanics of the cell
Living cells must alter their external form actively, otherwise functions like cell division would not be possible. At the Technical University of Munich (TUM) the biophysicist Professor Andreas Bausch and his team have developed a synthetic cell model to investigate the fundamental principles of the underlying cellular mechanics.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.04.2016
A look at the digital medicine of the future
A look at the digital medicine of the future
In the future, there may be medication that is tailored individually to each patient. Doctors might operate wearing 3D data glasses and thus be able to work with greater precision. Diagnosing rare diseases, which today can still take years, could be done in a matter of days. And we might even have therapies to combat mental illnesses such as schizophrenia.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.04.2016
Researchers block gene activity in bone tumors
Researchers block gene activity in bone tumors
Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in inhibiting the growth and spread of Ewing sarcoma in animal models. This type of bone tumor predominantly occurs in children and adolescents. The researchers have been able to significantly alter the gene activity underlying the tumor's formation, opening up new avenues for potential treatment strategies.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.03.2016
An alternative route to inflammation
Using a combination of newly developed methods, researchers led by LMU immunologist Veit Hornung have defined a previously unknown pathway that triggers inflammation. The immune system in vertebrates is capable of distinguishing "self" from "non-self" components, which enables recognition and destruction of invasive pathogens and aberrant cell types such as tumor cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.03.2016
Hospital hygienists' fear
Hospital hygienists’ fear
So-called hospital germs are a big worry for physicians and hygiene specialists as these bacteria can spell danger for people with a weakened immune system. This is especially true when the germs are resistant to one or more antibiotics and surround themselves with a so-called biofilm as a sort of protective shield.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.03.2016
Time-lapse View of Ecosystems of the Future
Biology Professor Matthias Rillig of Freie Universität Berlin Receives 2. Million Euros to Learn More about Consequences of Gradual Environmental Change by Studying Soil Fungi / With Photos How do organisms react as individuals and in communities to environmental conditions that gradually change over a long period? Using a new experimental approach Matthias Rillig and his team at the Department of Biology at Freie Universität Berlin hope to investigate this issue using the example of soil fungi.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.03.2016
Regional seed material performs better
Regional seed material performs better
Colorful and extensively used meadows and pastures provide valuable habitats for many plant and animal species. However, they have become very rare. In order to re-establish such grasslands, the plants they contain must be sown. Scientists and nature conservationists argue that seed material from the region in which the future meadow is located should be used.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2016
Obesity and diabetes can be epigenetically inherited
Diet-induced obesity and diabetes can be epigenetically* inherited by the offspring via both oocytes and sperm. Scientists from Technical University of Munich in collaboration with researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) have shown that. For its studies, the team used mice that had become obese and had developed type 2 diabetes due to a high-fat diet.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 11.03.2016
Shaping up to make the cut
Shaping up to make the cut
Before RNA copies of genes can program the synthesis of proteins, the non-coding regions are removed by the spliceosome. Munich researchers report that distinct conformations of a member of this molecular complex play a vital role in the process. Ribonucleic acids - RNAs for short - serve as intermediates in the ordered translation of the hereditary information stored in the DNA into blueprints for the synthesis of specific proteins.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.03.2016
The gut: performing into old age
The gut: performing into old age
A breakthrough in basic research and the first comprehensive study on the secretory activity of the human intestine: over a period of eight years, Dr. Dagmar Krüger of the Department of Human Biology at TU Munich has examined more than 2200 specimens from around 450 patients with bowel disease.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 07.03.2016
Talk about Yourself on Social Media?
New Study Published by Scientists at Freie Universität and the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences Reveals Brain Network for Sharing Self-related Information on Facebook A network of brain regions involved in self-disclosure on Facebook has been determined, according to a new study published in the open-access journal  Scientific Reports .

Life Sciences - Health - 03.03.2016
Early biomarker defined
A multicenter study led by LMU's Christian Haass and Michael Ewers has identified a biomarker associated with the activation of an innate immune response to neural damage during early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease results from the accumulation in the brain of protein deposits that are toxic to nerve cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.03.2016
Using Trojan horses to combat microorganisms
Using Trojan horses to combat microorganisms
Bacterial infections can have serious consequences - for example, when the microorganisms colonize an artificial heart valve or some other prosthesis. There is especially problematic when the bacteria are resistant to several antibiotics. Researchers are therefore looking for new methods of treatment as well as for ways to find centres of infection in the body.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.02.2016
Potential target against the Yoyo dieting effect
Potential target against the Yoyo dieting effect
A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU) and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) has identified a new mechanism that regulates the effect of the satiety hormone leptin. The study published in the journal 'Nature ' identified the enzyme HDAC5 as key factor in our control of body weight and food intake and potential target against the Yoyo dieting effect.

Life Sciences - Administration - 26.02.2016
Highly Endowed Grant from European Research Council for Heidelberg Biologist
Highly Endowed Grant from European Research Council for Heidelberg Biologist
Heidelberg biologist Dr. Sylvia Erhardt is receiving a highly endowed grant from the European Research Council (ERC), an ERC Consolidator Grant for excellent young researchers.