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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
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Life Sciences



Results 641 - 660 of 775.


Life Sciences - Health - 18.10.2016
The key to pathogenicity
The key to pathogenicity
LMU researchers have identified a pair of interacting molecules which play a critical role in the pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori. H. pylori infections can cause peptic ulcers and are associated with stomach cancer. The rod-shaped bacterium Helicobacter pylori colonizes the surface of the cells that make up the lining of the stomach, and can cause gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.10.2016
A dangerous bond
A dangerous bond
Research news Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium that can colonize the human stomach - sometimes with fatal consequences. A research group led by Prof. Markus Gerhard of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Bernhard B. Singer of the Institute for Anatomy at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Duisburg-Essen has discovered a completely new approach to preventing or treating infections with this bacterium as well as secondary complications.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.10.2016
Watching the brain in action
Watching the brain in action
Research news Watching millions of neurons in the brain interact with each another is the ultimate dream of neuroscientists. A new imaging method now makes it possible to observe the activation of large neural circuits, currently up to the size of a small-animal brain, in real time and three dimensions.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.10.2016
Big data processing enables worldwide bacterial analysis
Big data processing enables worldwide bacterial analysis
Research news Sequencing data from biological samples such as the skin, intestinal tissues, or soil and water are usually archived in public databases. This allows researchers from all over the globe to access them. However, this has led to the creation of extremely large quantities of data. To be able to explore all these data, new evaluation methods are necessary.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.09.2016
Children who keep HIV in check
Children who keep HIV in check
Some HIV-infected - and untreated - children do not develop AIDS. A new study shows that they control the virus in a different way from the few infected adults who remain disease-free, and sheds light on the reasons for this difference. Children who are HIV-positive but remain free of AIDS are very rare.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.09.2016
A niche for metastases
A niche for metastases
Research news Pancreatic cancer is an exceptionally aggressive type of cancer. Frequently, metastases already start to grow in other organs, particularly often in the liver, before the original tumor was even detected. Scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered a molecular mechanism, which is responsible for the prominent susceptibility of the liver to metastases at such an early stage.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.09.2016
Defying frost and the cold with hormones
Defying frost and the cold with hormones
Research news Plants cannot simply relocate to better surroundings when their environmental conditions are no longer suitable. Instead, they have developed sophisticated molecular adaptation mechanisms. Scientists at the Technical University Munich (TUM) in cooperation with the Helmholtz Center Munich and the University of Nottingham have been able to demonstrate that brassinosteroids, which until now have mainly been regarded as growth hormones, increase the resistance of plants against frost.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.09.2016
Intestinal bacteria influence food allergies
Intestinal bacteria influence food allergies
Research news Countless microorganisms live in the intestinal tract. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have been able to demonstrate that intestinal bacteria also play a role in determining the strength of anaphylactic reactions to food allergens. The scientists present their results at the annual convention of the European Society for Dermatological Research (ESDR), which is hosted by and at TUM this year.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.09.2016
Measuring forces in the DNA molecule
Measuring forces in the DNA molecule
Research news DNA, our genetic material, normally has the structure of a twisted rope ladder. Experts call this structure a double helix. Among other things, it is stabilized by stacking forces between base pairs. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded at measuring these forces for the very first time on the level of single base pairs.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.09.2016
Luminous heart cells
Luminous heart cells
Research news Cell models from stem cells serve an ever-increasing role in research of cardiac dysfunction. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in producing cells which offer new insights into properties of the heart. They installed a molecular sensor into the cells which emits light, and not only makes the cells' electrical activity visible, but also makes it possible for the first time to quickly identify cell types.

Physics - Life Sciences - 02.09.2016
2.3 Million Euros for Nano Research
German Research Foundation (DFG) Approved Funding for New High-performance Microscope at Freie Universität Berlin ' 288/2016 from Sep 02, 2016 The German Research Foundation has designated 2.3 million euros for a new cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) at Freie Universität Berlin.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 01.09.2016
The killer shrimp is not as bad as its reputation
The killer shrimp is not as bad as its reputation
Research news Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have discovered that the amphipod crustacean, which is native to the Ponto-Caspian region, is not a true predator and only plays an indirect role in the massive species extinction of small crustaceans in native waters. According to experimental results, the invasive killer shrimp actually only drove native amphipods out of their hiding places, making them easy prey for the round goby, a species which also originates from the Black Sea region.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 25.08.2016
A look at the molecular quality assurance within cells
A look at the molecular quality assurance within cells
Forschen Proteins fulfill vital functions in our body. They transport substances, combat pathogens, and function as catalysts. In order for these processes to function reliably, proteins must adopt a defined three-dimensional structure. Molecular "folding assistants", called chaperones, aid and scrutinize these structuring processes.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.08.2016
A clear view of the nervous system
A clear view of the nervous system
A new and versatile imaging technique enables researchers to trace the trajectories of whole nerve cells and provides extensive insights into the structure of neuronal networks. Lesions caused by traumatic brain damage, stroke and functional decline due to aging processes can disrupt the complex cellular network that constitutes the central nervous system, and lead to chronic pathologies, such as dementia, epilepsy and deleterious metabolic perturbations.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2016
The first stage of the cascade
The first stage of the cascade
Research news G proteins are molecular switches on the insides of cell membranes. They convey important signals to the inner workings of the cells. The associated receptors are targeted by all kinds of medications. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are now shedding light on precisely how the individual amino acids of the G protein move during the switching process.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.08.2016
Discovery of a brain sugar switch
Discovery of a brain sugar switch
Research news Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) discovered that our brain actively takes sugar from the blood. Prior to this, researchers around the world had assumed that this was a purely passive process. An international team led by diabetes expert Matthias Tschöp reported in the journal 'Cell' that transportation of sugar into the brain is regulated by so-called glia cells that react to hormones such as insulin or leptin; previously it was thought that this was only possible for neurons.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.08.2016
Mouse gut bacteria find a new home
Mouse gut bacteria find a new home
Research news Mouse models are extensively used in pharmaceutical and medical research, and it is known that the communities of microbes in their intestine. can have a significant impact on the research output. However, there is still insufficient information available about many bacteria inhabiting the intestine of mice.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.08.2016
274 from Aug 11, 2016 New Insights into Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Scientists at Freie Universität Publish New Findings of a Study on Effects of Anti-Inflammatory Peptides in Skin Cells
Scientists at Freie Universität Publish New Findings of a Study on Effects of Anti-Inflammatory Peptides in Skin Cells ' 274/2016 from Aug 11, 2016 Scientists at Freie Universität have investigated the effect of synthetic peptides. "We were able to demonstrate that peptides developed by the Research Center Borstel - Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences have a very good anti-inflammatory effect in different cell types of human skin," said Günther Weindl at the Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmacology, and Toxicology, Freie Universität, who led the experiment.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.08.2016
272 from Aug 08, 2016 When the Biological Clock of Plants Is Disturbed Biologists at Freie Universität Discovered a New Form of Stress in Plants
272 from Aug 08, 2016 When the Biological Clock of Plants Is Disturbed Biologists at Freie Universität Discovered a New Form of Stress in Plants
Biologists at Freie Universität Discovered a New Form of Stress in Plants ' 272/2016 from Aug 08, 2016 Scientists at the Dahlem Center of Plant Sciences (DCPS), Freie Universität, discovered a new form of stress in plants that they have named circadian stress. The findings indicate that it is caused by a change in the day-night rhythm.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.08.2016
A Protective Cap for Bacterial RNA
A Protective Cap for Bacterial RNA
For the first time, researchers from Heidelberg University have deciphered the function of the so-called decapping enzyme in bacteria. These molecular helpers remove the protective cap at the start of ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules. This decapping destabilises the ribonucleic acid, thus allowing degradation to begin in the cells.