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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
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Life Sciences



Results 601 - 620 of 823.


Health - Life Sciences - 21.02.2018
Breakthrough for peptide medication
Breakthrough for peptide medication
Research news Peptides, short amino acid chains that control many functions in the human body, represent a billion-dollar market, also in the pharmaceutical industry. But, normally these medications must be injected. A research team led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now determined how peptides can be designed so that they can be easily administered as a liquid or tablet.

Life Sciences - 14.02.2018
Watching myelin patterns form
Watching myelin patterns form
Research news Nerve fibers are surrounded by a myelin sheath. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now made the first-ever "live" observations of how this protective layer is formed. The team discovered that the characteristic patterns of the myelin layer are determined at an early stage.

Life Sciences - 12.02.2018
Plastic-eating bacteria more diverse and numerous than previously thought
Plastic-eating bacteria more diverse and numerous than previously thought
We only recycle a small amount of plastics such as PET (polyethylene terephthalate), used to make bottles and packaging. Most ends up in the environment, where it takes a very long time to decompose. According to the German Environment Agency (UBA), it takes up to 450 years for a plastic bottle to break down.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 05.02.2018
Scientists investigate the molecular basis of social evolution in Termites: A comparison with ants and bees: Similar processes involved in the formation of societies although unrelated to termites
Scientists investigate the molecular basis of social evolution in Termites: A comparison with ants and bees: Similar processes involved in the formation of societies although unrelated to termites
One phenomenon that fascinated Charles Darwin and many other researchers since, is the emergence of huge, complex insect societies. Even more exciting is that the societies of termites and ants evolved independently from each other. Although unrelated, termites and ants are very similar: They both have a so-called "eusocial" way of living.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 02.02.2018
Key enzyme in citrate cycle also functions "backwards": Study published in "Science" journal disproves conventional wisdom: citrate synthase can also cleave citrate and not only build it up
The citrate cycle: most people will probably remember this metabolic pathway from biology lessons at school. It provides numerous organisms with energy by breaking down organic substances, thereby enabling them to live. Organisms ranging all the way from bacteria to humans use this pathway, consuming oxygen in the process.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.01.2018
Insights into cancer evolution
Insights into cancer evolution
Research news Pancreatic cancer is a form of cancer associated with the highest mortality rates in the world. However, until now genetic changes that could explain the aggressiveness and early metastasis of this form of cancer had not been found. A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) has now shown that those characteristics can be explained by specific gene amplifications which occur along various evolutionary pathways of the cancer.

Life Sciences - Administration - 26.01.2018
Regeneration starts with a wound: Researchers demonstrate with flatworms and zebrafish that any injury can initiate regeneration of whole tissues
Regeneration starts with a wound: Researchers demonstrate with flatworms and zebrafish that any injury can initiate regeneration of whole tissues
Some animals are naturally capable of something that remains merely an aspiration for humans - restoring lost body parts. In order to understand the mechanisms behind regenerative programs, researchers are studying such animals and have observed two types of healing processes. Some wounds, for example a scratch in the skin, resolve by wound healing.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 16.01.2018
Improving Stroke Treatment Through Machine Learning
Methods from optogenetics and machine learning should help improve treatment options for stroke patients. Researchers from Heidelberg University have developed a computer vision technique to analyse the changes in motor skills that result from targeted stimulation of healthy areas of the brain. Movements recorded with a video camera are automatically analysed to monitor the rehabilitation process and evaluate and adjust the optogenetic stimulation.

Environment - Life Sciences - 11.01.2018
Species identification in the water bottle
Species identification in the water bottle
Research news Environmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first. For the first time, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) systematically investigated the effect of various environmental factors on environmental DNA analyses. By doing so, the researchers have made an important step towards the standardized application of this method for the monitoring of water bodies.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.01.2018
Lipid metabolism controls regeneration in the central nervous system
Lipid metabolism controls regeneration in the central nervous system
Research news Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, in which the body's own immune cells attack the fatty, insulating myelin sheath surrounding nerve fibers. The regeneration of intact myelin sheathes is a necessary prerequisite for patients to recover from MS relapses.

Life Sciences - Philosophy - 27.12.2017
Behind the scenes: journalists visit animal testing lab: "An unusual step": press event to launch the "Principles on the Ethical Treatment of Animals
The white mouse has been anaesthetized. Its little legs have been affixed to a heating plate by means of adhesive strips, and a large amount of gel has been spread over its clean-shaven breast. An ultrasound probe is positioned overhead, and Richard Holtmeier, a member of the team at the European Institute for Molecular Imaging (EIMI) at the University of Münster is using this to study how the mouse copes with a plastic catheter which has been inserted into its carotid artery.

Life Sciences - Physics - 19.12.2017
The fate of primordial germ cells: CiM researchers show how primordial germ cells follow their destiny and give rise to sperm and egg cells
The fate of primordial germ cells: CiM researchers show how primordial germ cells follow their destiny and give rise to sperm and egg cells
When an embryo develops, single cells acquire specific fates that allow them to perform specific tasks in the adult organism. The primordial germ cells are formed very early in embryonic development and migrate within the embryo to the developing testis or the ovary, where they give rise to sperm and egg cells.

Life Sciences - Physics - 06.12.2017
DNA origami surpasses important thresholds
DNA origami surpasses important thresholds
Research news It is the double strands of our genes that make them so strong. Using a technique known as DNA origami, biophysicist Hendrik Dietz has been building nanometer-scale objects for several years at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). Now Dietz and his team have not only broken out of the nanometer realm to build larger objects, but have also cut the production costs a thousand-fold.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.12.2017
Shut-off switch for lymphoma
Shut-off switch for lymphoma
Research news A safety switch that automatically stops the device for example before it overheats are built into many electrical appliances. The body's cells are also equipped with this kind of "emergency stop" functions. They make sure that a defective cell doesn't grow uncontrollably, becoming a tumor cell.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 01.12.2017
Computer analysis fills gaps in antibody blueprint
Computer analysis fills gaps in antibody blueprint
Research news Antibodies defend our bodies against intruders. These molecules consist of proteins with attached sugars. However, the blueprint directing the processing of these sugars on the protein was not well understood until now. Scientists from the Technical University of Munich and the Helmholtz Zentrum München used computer analysis to complete this blueprint and confirmed their findings in the laboratory.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.11.2017
Versatile cancer drugs
Versatile cancer drugs
Research news Medications which block enzymes belonging to the kinase family, are among the most effective pharmaceuticals for targeted cancer therapies. Scientists at the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have examined 243 kinase inhibitors which are either approved drugs or have been tested in clinical trials.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.11.2017
Visible signals from brain and heart
Visible signals from brain and heart
Research news Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualize calcium in living animals with the help of a radiation-free imaging technique known as optoacoustics.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.11.2017
Loss of species destroys ecosystems
Loss of species destroys ecosystems
Research news How serious is the loss of species globally? Are material cycles in an ecosystem with few species changed? In order to find this out, the "Jena Experiment" was established in 2002, one of the largest biodiversity experiments worldwide. Professor Wolfgang Weisser from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) reports on two unexpected findings of the long-term study: Biodiversity influences almost half the processes in the ecosystem, and intensive grassland management does not result in higher yields than high biodiversity.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 28.11.2017
Two Prestigious Grants from European Research Council for Freie Universität Berlin
ERC Consolidator Grants for Physicist Stephanie Reich and Computer Scientist Frank Noé No 332/2017 from Nov 28, 2017 Researchers at Freie Universität Berlin have been awarded two prestigious grants from the European Research Council (ERC). Physicist Stephanie Reich and computer scientist Frank Noé won ERC Consolidator Grants, as the ERC announced on Tuesday in Brussels.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2017
An atlas of the heart
An atlas of the heart
Research news A healthy heart beats about two billion times during a lifetime - thanks to the interplay of more than 10,000 proteins. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) and the German Heart Centre at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now determined which and how many individual proteins are present in each type of cell that occurs in the heart.