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Results 61 - 80 of 1231.


Life Sciences - Chemistry - 01.12.2023
PicoRuler: Molecular Rulers for High-Resolution Microscopy
PicoRuler: Molecular Rulers for High-Resolution Microscopy
Good news for researchers working with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy: Biocompatible molecular rulers are available for the first time to calibrate the latest super-resolution microscopy methods. Latest super-resolution microscopy methods now achieve an optical resolution in the range of a few nanometres.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.11.2023
Taking antibiotics back in time
Taking antibiotics back in time
In today's medical landscape, antibiotics are pivotal in combatting bacterial infections. These potent compounds, produced by bacteria and fungi, act as natural defenses against microbial attacks. A team of researchers delved into the intricate world of glycopeptide antibiotics - a vital resource in countering drug-resistant pathogens - to uncover their evolutionary origins.

Life Sciences - 30.11.2023
Inhibitory Signals in Visual Neurons Protect Against Overstimulation
Inhibitory Signals in Visual Neurons Protect Against Overstimulation
Freiburg neuroscientists identify signals in the brain of zebrafish larvae that suppress the activity of nerve cells during locomotion When the eye jumps from one point to another, the image of our surroundings rapidly passes across the retina and triggers a wave of neuronal activity. In order not to be overwhelmed by the sensory impressions produced by our own movements, the brain suppresses processing of the stimuli as this happens.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.11.2023
Penguins nesting in a dangerous environment obtain large quantities of sleep via seconds-long microsleeps
Penguins nesting in a dangerous environment obtain large quantities of sleep via seconds-long microsleeps
New study shows the most fragmented sleep ever recorded in an animal When breeding in a dangerous environment, chinstrap penguins usually do not nod off for more than four seconds at a time. However, they still get up to twelve hours of sleep in total thanks to over 600 such microsleep phases per hour - and over 10,000 per day.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.11.2023
Tracing the Evolution of the 'Little Brain'
Tracing the Evolution of the ’Little Brain’
Heidelberg scientists unveil genetic programmes controlling the development of cellular diversity in the cerebellum of humans and other mammals The evolution of higher cognitive functions in human beings has so far mostly been linked to the expansion of the neocortex - a region of the brain that is responsible, inter alia, for conscious thought, movement and sensory perception.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.11.2023
Neurodegeneration in Myelin Disease: No Myelin is Better than Bad Myelin
Neurodegeneration in Myelin Disease: No Myelin is Better than Bad Myelin
Efficient removal of abnormal myelin allows survival of nerve fibers targeted by adaptive immune cells, according to a novel study by scientists of the University Hospital Würzburg. Myelin is an insulating sheath around axons - the processes connecting nerve cells - that is mostly composed of lipids and proteins.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.11.2023
Malfunction in spermatogenesis
Malfunction in spermatogenesis
Bonn researchers uncover contribution of Cylicin proteins to male fertility For successful fertilization, sperm should move forward rapidly and be shaped correctly. The unique structure of the sperm cells forms during spermiogenesis. Now, researchers from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the Transdisciplinary Research Unit "Life & Health" at the University of Bonn have found that fertility problems in both mice and humans can be caused by loss of so-called cylicines.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.11.2023
Fat cells help repair damaged nerves
Fat cells help repair damaged nerves
Damage to the body's peripheral nerves can cause pain and movement disorders. Researchers at the Leipzig University have recently investigated how damaged nerves can regenerate better. They found that fat tissue strongly supports the Schwann cells needed for repair during the healing process. The results were published in the renowned journal "Cell Metabolism".

Life Sciences - 24.11.2023
Broad Bean Thrives Despite a Hyperactive Ion Channel
Broad Bean Thrives Despite a Hyperactive Ion Channel
Plants in which an ion channel of the vacuole is hyperactive are extremely stressed and grow poorly. But the broad bean is an exception, as Würzburg researchers have discovered. Like the human body, plants also use electrical signals to process and pass on information. In addition to the cell membrane, the membrane of the central vacuole plays an important role in this process.

Life Sciences - Physics - 24.11.2023
How Bacteria Defend Themselves Against Plasmas
How Bacteria Defend Themselves Against Plasmas
A heat shock protein protects the cells against protein clumping. It degrades, however, over longer treatment periods. Plasmas are used, for example, in wound treatment against pathogens that are resistant to antibiotics. However, bacteria can defend themselves: They employ a heat shock protein that protects them.

Life Sciences - 23.11.2023
How A Pitcher Plant Evolved with Tenfold Genomic Wealth
How A Pitcher Plant Evolved with Tenfold Genomic Wealth
A new study by Würzburg botanist Kenji Fukushima shows the role of subgenome dominance for plants in the evolutionary development of special traits, such as a carnivorous lifestyle. In a recent study, a team led by Würzburg botanist Kenji Fukushima investigates the genomic structure of the carnivorous pitcher plant Nepenthes gracilis and shows how polyploidy - the phenomenon of having more than two sets of chromosomes in cells - contributes to evolutionary innovation.

Life Sciences - Physics - 21.11.2023
Tiny Beads Preserve Enzymes for Biocatalysis
Tiny Beads Preserve Enzymes for Biocatalysis
Plasmas can provide the co-substrate needed for biocatalysis of valuable substances, but are also harmful to enzymes. By attaching enzymes to small beads the enzymes are protected and remain active up to 44 times longer. Some enzymes, such as the one derived from fungi and investigated in this study, are able to produce valuable substances such as the fragrance (R)-1-phenylethanol.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.11.2023
Cut by cut: extensibility of the heart walls
As we all know, only what goes in goes out: how flexible the heart walls are is therefore also crucial for the heart's pumping function. A working group from the Institute of Physiology II at the Medical Faculty of the University of Münster has been able to show for the first time which structural elements influence this flexibility and to what extent.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 16.11.2023
Cell-free quest for new antibiotics
Cell-free quest for new antibiotics
The rising resistance of bacteria to antibiotics presents an escalating global health risk. Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg, Germany, have combined synthetic biology and artificial intelligence (AI) to develop a more efficient approach to finding and creating new antimicrobial peptides that are effective against a wide range of bacteria.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2023
The social network of proteins
The social network of proteins
Stanley Milgram's groundbreaking "Six Degrees of Separation" experiment demonstrated the surprisingly close connections between us humans back in the 1960s. Now the research team led by Professor Matthias Mann at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany, has shown that the proteins in our cells are equally well connected.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.11.2023
When we feel things that are not there
When we feel things that are not there
The discovery of the phantom touch illusion provides insights into human perception and opens up new perspectives for interaction with virtual reality technology. Virtual reality (VR) is not only a technology for games and entertainment, but also has potential in science and medicine. Researchers at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, have now gained new insights into human perception with the help of VR.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 13.11.2023
Artificial intelligence: Unexpected results
Artificial intelligence: Unexpected results
Researchers at the University of Bonn take a look behind the scenes of machine learning in drug research Artificial intelligence (AI) is on the rise. Until now, AI applications generally have "black box" character: How AI arrives at its results remains hidden. Jürgen Bajorath, a cheminformatics scientist at the University of Bonn, and his team have developed a method that reveals how certain AI applications work in pharmaceutical research.

Life Sciences - 13.11.2023
Cycle of fasting and feeding is crucial for healthy ageing
Cycle of fasting and feeding is crucial for healthy ageing
Fasting interventions, which involve alternating periods of fasting and refeeding, are generally thought to improve health. But these interventions don't work as well in old animals. The question is: Why? By studying the short-lived killifish, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne have shown that older fish deviate from a youthful fasting and refeeding cycle, and instead enter a state of perpetual fasting, even when ingesting food.

Life Sciences - 10.11.2023
Order for brewer's yeast
Order for brewer’s yeast
For years, researchers have been working to synthetically recreate the genome, or more precisely, the chromosomes of brewer's yeast. Now it has been possible to combine all transfer RNA genes in an artificial chromosome. The result sets a milestone in the development of the first synthetic eukaryotic genome and opens up new avenues for basic research.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 10.11.2023
How stress affects our cognitive emotion regulation
How stress affects our cognitive emotion regulation
How do men and women regulate their emotions under stress? A new study in cognitive psychology that makes use of the socially evaluated cold-pressor test has answered this question. The response to stress varies from person to person. "We're trying to find out which factors may account for these different susceptibilities," explains Dr. Katja Langer, a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Cognitive Psychology.



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