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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
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Life Sciences



Results 41 - 60 of 710.


Health - Life Sciences - 24.03.2022
There is more to Sars-CoV-2 than meets the eye
There is more to Sars-CoV-2 than meets the eye
The Sars-CoV-2 coronavirus does not only cause infections of the respiratory tract. Other organ systems, such as the nervous system, can also be affected. In fact, Sars-CoV-2 mRNA has been detected in the brain in autopsies of patients who died from Covid-19. There is also growing evidence that coronaviruses can enter the retina of the eye, yet it is unclear which retinal structures are infected by Sars-CoV-2 and whether the retinal pathologies identified in Covid-19 patients are a direct or indirect result of retinal infection.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.03.2022
How sugar promotes inflammation
How sugar promotes inflammation
03/22/2022 Excessive sugar consumption can promote inflammatory processes in the body and facilitate the development of autoimmune diseases. A research team at the University of Würzburg has now deciphered new details of these processes. People who consume sugar and other carbohydrates in excess over a long period of time have an increased risk of developing an autoimmune disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.03.2022
New CRISPR Element Regulates Viral Defense
New CRISPR Element Regulates Viral Defense
03/22/2022 Researchers from Würzburg, Freiburg and Leipzig discover a mechanism for prioritizing the immune response in bacteria. What tasks need to be done today, and which is the most urgent? People have to constantly set priorities in their daily life. Bacteria are no different: They too must prioritize when combating viruses with CRISPR.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 21.03.2022
Brain stimulation shows beneficial effects for motor deficits following stroke
Brain stimulation shows beneficial effects for motor deficits following stroke
This promising non-invasive method can be used for rehabilitation, provided that an individualised approach is developed Persistent paralysis and coordination problems are among the most common consequences of a stroke. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, the University Medical Center Halle, and the Charité -Universitätsmedizin in Berlin have discovered that brain stimulation helps.

Life Sciences - Research Management - 18.03.2022
New findings on the internal clock of the fruit fly
New findings on the internal clock of the fruit fly
Light as a regulator: Team of researchers demonstrates role of transport proteins in the synchronisation of circadian rhythms Most living organisms have an internal clock which, among other things, controls the sleep-wake rhythm. The internal rhythm lasts approximately one day ("circadian"), i.e. about 24 hours, and is regulated by means of various "clock genes".

Health - Life Sciences - 18.03.2022
Lung Tissue from the Lab
Lung Tissue from the Lab
Organoids could be used in diagnosis, drug development, and fundamental research Laboratory studies of lung tissue usually require the removal of large amounts of human or animal tissue. Now scientists from the University of Freiburg's Faculty of Medicine have succeeded in collaboration with American researchers in generating tiny quantities of lung tissue, so-called organoids, from just a few body cells in the lab.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 10.03.2022
Toolbox for systematic study of receptor regulation
Toolbox for systematic study of receptor regulation
Researchers from Jena and Bonn have developed a cell system to analyze the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors. To prevent overstimulation, these pharmacologically important receptors can be inactivated by specific enzymes inside the cell. That desensitization mechanism is suspected of playing a crucial role for habituation on painkillers or anti-asthmatics.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.03.2022
Rear-end Collision on the 'Ribosome Highway'
Rear-end Collision on the ’Ribosome Highway’
Researchers identify bacterial protein that senses and rescues "stalled" ribosomes As a molecular machine found in the cells of all organisms, the ribosome is responsible for making new proteins. It reads the blueprint for a certain protein on a messenger molecule - known as messenger RNA (mRNA) - and then converts this information into new proteins.

Life Sciences - 09.03.2022
What Bonobos Can Teach Us about Human Speech
International team of researchers with members from Freie Universität Berlin examines the fundamentals of language development Researchers from Europe and the United States of America conducted a study on "sound symbolism" in primates. The experiment involved experts from Freie Universität Berlin, the University of St. Andrews, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, as well as Pennsylvania State University and the Ape Initiative.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 09.03.2022
Universal Mechanism of Methane Formation Discovered
Universal Mechanism of Methane Formation Discovered
Scientists from Heidelberg and Marburg prove that the greenhouse gas is formed chemically in the cells of all organisms The formation of the greenhouse gas methane is based on a universal mechanism. Scientists at Heidelberg University and the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg have made this discovery.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 08.03.2022
Mushroom genus Cortinarius follows its own metabolic pathway
Mushroom genus Cortinarius follows its own metabolic pathway
What proves to be advantageous will be preserved in the long term. Put in very simple terms, this is the principle of evolution whereby organisms adapt to an environment in the best possible way. These adaptation processes often result in similar or the same traits in different groups of organisms, if their environment requires it.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.03.2022
How Chronic Pain Arises
How Chronic Pain Arises
Heidelberg researchers identify molecular mechanisms that influence pain processing and sensitivity One epigenetic factor as well as one organic anion transporter (OAT1), whose function in the nervous system was hitherto unknown, contribute to the development of chronic pain. The underlying molecular mechanism was identified by a team of researchers led by Dr Daniela Mauceri at the Interdisciplinary Center for Neurosciences (IZN) of Heidelberg University.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.03.2022
Large bacterial populations develop stronger resistance to antibiotics
An international team of scientists at Wageningen University (Netherlands) and the Institute for Biological Physics at the University of Cologne have shown that small and large bacterial populations follow qualitatively different evolutionary paths: Larger populations develop stronger antibiotic resistance than smaller ones, and they rely on different types of resistance mutations.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 03.03.2022
New method to produce chemically modified mRNA developed
In a recent study, the research group at the University of Cologne's Institute of Organic Chemistry led by Professor Dr Stephanie Kath-Schorr describes a novel method for the enzymatic production of synthetic messenger RNA (mRNA). While natural base modifications of mRNA are already being used - for example by BioNTech/Pfizer for the production of their coronavirus vaccine - this newly developed mRNA additionally contains site-specifically introduced, non-natural nucleotides.

Life Sciences - 03.03.2022
What Makes Plants Electrically Excitable
What Makes Plants Electrically Excitable
In humans, only nerves and muscle cells are electrically excitable, whereas in plants almost all cells are. This is due to a sophisticated mechanism in an ion channel of the vacuole. Plant cells use electrical signals to process and transmit information. In 1987, as a postdoc of Erwin Neher in Göttingen, biophysicist Rainer Hedrich discovered an ion channel in the central vacuole of the plant cell, which is activated by calcium and electrical voltage, using the patch-clamp technique (Nobel Prize for Neher and Sakmann 1991).

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 02.03.2022
Turtle species in Eastern Europe survived the event that killed the dinosaurs
Turtle species in Eastern Europe survived the event that killed the dinosaurs
Palaeobiologists from the University of Tübingen have described a previously unknown turtle species that lived in what is now Romania some 70 million years ago. The reptile, measuring 19 cm in length, has no close relatives now but is a member of the larger group of side-necked turtles that are today found mostly in the southern hemisphere.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.03.2022
Targeted enzymes destroy virus RNA
A research team led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has successfully used specific enzymes to destroy the genetic information of SARS-CoV-2 directly after the virus penetrates the cell. The findings could serve as the basis for a therapy to treat COVID-19. Our genome contains building instructions for proteins and other molecules.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.02.2022
Cancer: When viruses and bacteria cooperate
Cancer: When viruses and bacteria cooperate
02/24/2022 Infections with several pathogens simultaneously increase the risk of cervical cancer-these results from a study conducted on artificial 3D tissue models. Patients who develop cervical cancer are often infected not only with the human papillomavirus (HPV) but also simultaneously with the bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis .

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 23.02.2022
Microbes living under extreme conditions
Microbes living under extreme conditions
At the mouth of the Rio Tinto in southwestern Spain, acidic river water - polluted with heavy metals from ore mining and mineral weathering - mixes with the salt water of the Atlantic Ocean. Here, microorganisms that love such extreme conditions form a unique community. They live in water as acidic as vinegar, are resistant to high salinity, and some also cope very well with high levels of toxic metals.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.02.2022
While some insects are declining, others might be thriving
While some insects are declining, others might be thriving
Observations of abundance changes in one group of insects- for example grasshoppers - say very little about how other types of insects, such as flies, are doing, even in the same place. This is because different groups of insects may show similar trends in one place, but dissimilar trends in other places.