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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
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Life Sciences



Results 21 - 40 of 821.


Environment - Life Sciences - 05.09.2022
Toward Biodiverse Cities: Adopting Insect-Friendly Green Space Management in Urban Areas
Researchers from Freie Universität publish results of a new study in international journal Urban Forestry and Urban Greening A recent meta-analysis study carried out by researchers from Freie Universität Berlin has demonstrated that properly managing green spaces in cities can have a positive effect on the abundance and diversity of insects living there.

Life Sciences - Environment - 05.09.2022
How does nature nurture the brain?
How does nature nurture the brain?
Study shows that a one-hour walk in nature reduces stress-related brain activity After a 60-minute walk in nature, activity in brain regions involved in stress processing decreases. This is the finding of a recent study by the Lise Meitner Group for Environmental Neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, published in Molecular Psychiatry .

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 05.09.2022
What fossils reveal about hybridization of early humans
What fossils reveal about hybridization of early humans
Many people living today have a small component of Neanderthal DNA in their genes, suggesting an important role for admixture with archaic human lineages in the evolution of our species. Paleogenetic evidence indicates that hybridization with Neanderthals and other ancient groups occurred multiple times, with our species- history resembling more a network or braided stream than a tree.

Life Sciences - 02.09.2022
New clues about land plants' closest algal relatives
New clues about land plants’ closest algal relatives
Researchers including Göttingen University use genomic data to pinpoint emergences of multicellularity Land plants are an extremely diverse group and, in terms of structure, the most complex organisms that photosynthesize. Their closest algal relatives, the Zygnematophyceae , however, have a more humble body plan: they are simply unicells or just filaments.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.09.2022
From Wound Healing to Regeneration
From Wound Healing to Regeneration
Heidelberg scientists demonstrate how injuries are converted to regeneration signals at the molecular level The phenomenon of regeneration was discovered over 200 years ago in the freshwater polyp Hydra. Until now, however, it was largely unclear how the orderly regeneration of lost tissues or organs is activated after injury.

Life Sciences - 01.09.2022
New ant species
New ant species
An international team of scientists has discovered a previously unknown extinct ant species encased in a unique piece of amber from Africa. Using the X-ray light source PETRA III at the German Electron Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg the researchers, from Friedrich Schiller University Jena, the University of Rennes in France, the University of Gdansk in Poland, as well as the  Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon in Geesthacht, Germany, had examined the critical fossil remains from 13 individual animals in the amber and realised that they could not be attributed to any previously known species.

Life Sciences - 01.09.2022
Dragons and brain evolution
Dragons and brain evolution
A molecular atlas of an Australian dragon's brain sheds new light on over 300 million years of brain evolution These days, dragons are keeping Game of Thrones fans on their toes. But they are also providing important insights into vertebrate brain evolution, as revealed by the work of Max-Planck scientists on the brain of the Australian bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps .

Life Sciences - Health - 31.08.2022
Using nanopores to detect epigenetic changes faster
Using nanopores to detect epigenetic changes faster
A step towards optimizing medical diagnostics Changes known as epigenetic modifications play an important role in cancer development, among other things. Being able to analyze them quickly and reliably could, for example, contribute significantly to the further development of personalized therapy. A research team from the Institute of Physiology at the University of Freiburg has now succeeded in characterizing the chemical changes in proteins that are typical for epigenetic modifications using nanopore analysis.

Life Sciences - Environment - 31.08.2022
The sexuality of flowers is controlled by insect pests
Category: Research Flowers are plant's sexual structures that are normally assumed to have evolved in concert with their mutualistic pollinators, such as bees, butterflies and honeybirds. However, a new study involving the Technical University of Munich (TUM) in collaboration with partners in Brazil, Marburg and Zurich shows that herbivorous insects play a central role.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 30.08.2022
How value shapes the fluctuations of conscious perception
How value shapes the fluctuations of conscious perception
Although visual perception might seem as easy as just opening our eyes and reporting what is out there, the underlying computations are surprisingly complex. One of the more revealing ways to study these computations is by using inputs that are ambiguous or even impossible under normal circumstances (for instance with radically different pictures seen by the two eyes).

Life Sciences - 25.08.2022
Plants can measure the intensity of salt stress
Plants can measure the intensity of salt stress
Biologists at the University of Münster have produced the first description of a calcium signal-controlled switch mechanism for adaptation to varying levels of salt stress / Study published in "Developmental Cell" Unfavourable environmental conditions represent considerable stress for plants. A high level of salt content (sodium chloride, NaCl) in the soil is for example just such a stressor which has a negative impact on plants.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.08.2022
DNA guardians out of control
DNA guardians out of control
Researchers at the University of Bonn discover mechanism that leads to ANCA-associated vasculitis Our own immune system can become the enemy when mechanisms that are actually protective get out of control. In ANCA-associated vasculitis, excessive inflammatory reactions lead to pulmonary hemorrhages that can be fatal if left untreated.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.08.2022
New Players in the Immune Response
New Players in the Immune Response
Lymph nodes trigger very different immune responses - depending on which body tissue they are connected to. Special T cells are responsible for this newly discovered relation. The human body contains 600 to 800 lymph nodes, which are specialised organs that trigger immune responses. To be informed about infections in the body, lymph nodes are connected to the individual organs via lymph vessels.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.08.2022
More accurate prediction of cancer risk in Individuals with Li-Fraumeni syndrome
More accurate prediction of cancer risk in Individuals with Li-Fraumeni syndrome
Study from the German Cancer Predisposition Registry: The type of TP53 variant matters Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a cancer predisposition syndrome that is caused by pathogenic TP53 variants and is associated with a massively increased cancer risk. It represents one of the most important genetic causes of cancer in children and adults.

Life Sciences - 19.08.2022
Correct evolutionary relationships among possums
Correct evolutionary relationships among possums
Specialists for the evolutionary history of marsupials at the University of Münster undertook a genetic "time travel" back 50 million years The brushtail possum asked the sugar glider, "Are we related?" For many years, science answered "No". For a long time, genetic data provided evidence that the australasiatic possums, the Phalangeroidea (including the brushtail possum) and Petauroidea (including the sugar glider), were divided into two phylogenetic branches without common ancestry.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.08.2022
When smooth muscle cells lack strength
When smooth muscle cells lack strength
The heart pumps blood through the vascular system, supplying cells with oxygen and energy Smooth muscle cells in the vessels finely regulate the blood flow. If they cannot perform their task, malformations and dilations of the vascular system may occur, according to a research team led by Professor Alfred Nordheim from the Interfaculty Institute of Cell Biology at the University of Tübingen, together with scientists from Tübingen, Münster and Uppsala, Sweden.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.08.2022
Researchers discover natural compounds against coronavirus
Researchers discover natural compounds against coronavirus
Scientists at the University of Hamburg and DESY have identified three compounds that are promising candidates for drug development against coronavirus.

Life Sciences - 18.08.2022
Sweet sap, savory ants
Sweet sap, savory ants
Woodpeckers taste sweet, but wrynecks-unusual woodpeckers that specialize on ants-lost the ability to taste sugars Many mammals have a sweet tooth, but birds lost their sweet receptor during evolution. Although hummingbirds and songbirds independently repurposed their savory receptor to sense sugars, how other birds taste sweet is unclear.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.08.2022
New Target Structure Against Corona
New Target Structure Against Corona
Completely unexpectedly, the enzyme ceramidase emerges as a new target structure for the therapy of SARS-CoV-2 infections. This is reported by Würzburg researchers in "Cells". Fluoxetine, a common antidepressant, inhibits the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus in cell cultures and in preparations from human lung tissue.

Life Sciences - 16.08.2022
Fächer flügler know no pain
Fächer flügler know no pain
Reproduction in the insect order of fan-winged moths is not for the faint-hearted: to fertilize his partner's eggs, the male fan-winged moth injures the female's "neck" with his hooked penis and injects her seeds directly into the inside of her body. This so-called traumatic mating is risky for the female.