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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
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Environment



Results 81 - 100 of 265.


Environment - Life Sciences - 17.05.2021
Reduced plant species richness means insects at risk
Reduced plant species richness means insects at risk
Joint project including Göttingen University observes reduced plant species richness and declining diversity of associated insects Where plant species diversity decreases, insect diversity decreases too and with it biodiversity as a whole. From the intensively managed meadows and pastures to dense and dark beech forests, insects that specialise in just a few plant species are disappearing: the plants that provide their food no longer grow there.

Environment - 14.05.2021
How Do Bees Communicate?
A research team with members from Freie Universität Berlin, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the University of Oslo have been measuring the electrostatic signals of bees No 090/2021 from May 14, 2021 A research team composed of members from Freie Universität Berlin, the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Kunming, and the University of Oslo have developed a method of monitoring the electrostatic signals of bees.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 12.05.2021
Is Climate Sensitivity Higher Than Believed?
Is Climate Sensitivity Higher Than Believed?
Meta-study on noble gas concentrations in ground water reconstructs climate in the last Ice Age The last Ice Age about 20,000 years ago may have been colder than previous reconstructions of the period's global temperature have led us to believe. An international meta-study to which Werner Aeschbach of the Institute of Environmental Physics at Heidelberg University contributed suggests this may have been the case.

Environment - 03.05.2021
Revealing the secret cocoa pollinators
Revealing the secret cocoa pollinators
The importance of pollinators to ensure successful harvests and thus global food security is widely acknowledged. However, the specific pollinators for even major crops - such as cocoa - haven't yet been identified and there remain many questions about sustainability, conservation and plantation management to enhance their populations and, thereby, pollination services.

Environment - 28.04.2021
Is forest harvesting increasing in Europe?
Is forest harvesting increasing in Europe?
Forest loss is not due to timber harvesting A 2020 study by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) used satellite data to assess forest cover and claimed an abrupt increase in the harvested forest in Europe from 2016. The authors suggested that this increase resulted from expanding wood markets.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.04.2021
Seasonal Water Resource on the Upper Indus
Seasonal Water Resource on the Upper Indus
Heidelberg geographers draw up full inventory of barely researched aufeis (icing) fields Seasonally occurring fields of aufeis (icing) constitute an important resource for the water supply of the local population in the Upper Indus Basin. However, little research has been done on them so far. Geographers at the South Asia Institute of Heidelberg University have now examined the spreading of aufeis and, for the first time, created a full inventory of these aufeis fields.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 22.04.2021
Plant provenance influences pollinators
Plant provenance influences pollinators
Insect decline is one of the greatest challenges facing our society. As a result of the destruction of many natural habitats, bees, bumblebees, butterflies, beetles and the like find less and less food. As a consequence, they are barely able to fulfil their role as pollinators of wild and cultivated plants.

Life Sciences - Environment - 09.04.2021
Plants regulate their nitrogen supply with the help of bacteria
Plants enrich soil with flavonoids to attract more nitrogen producing bacteria / Study could lead in the long term to new varieties that need less fertilizer The study was led by the Universities of Bonn and Southwest China. Cologne-based plant researcher Professor Marcel Bucher of CEPLAS, the Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences, took part in the study.

Life Sciences - Environment - 31.03.2021
Analysis of ancient bones reveals Stone Age diet details
Fish was not on the menu of the hunter-gatherers of southern Europe 27,000 years ago. Surprisingly, people on the Iberian Peninsula in the Late Gravettian period mostly ate plants and land animals such as rabbits, deer and horses. An international team of researchers has been able to determine this for the first time on the basis of an isotope study of human fossils from the Serinyà caves in Catalonia.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.03.2021
How Grasslands respond to climate change
How Grasslands respond to climate change
Effects of CO2 increase were already apparent in the past century The rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and concurrent climate change has led to yield reductions of grass-rich grassland vegetation in the past century. This observation was made by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) who, working jointly with colleagues from Rothamsted (U.K.), conducted a study on the world's oldest permanent ecological experiment there.

Economics / Business - Environment - 18.03.2021
Planning tool for cargo bike logistics
Planning tool for cargo bike logistics
Research team explores potential for package delivery Cargo bikes could play a much bigger role in urban package delivery. This conclusion was reached in a study based on the cities of Munich and Regensburg, where around one seventh of delivery-related CO2 emissions could be reduced. The research team has developed a planning tool to help companies and municipalities identify the potential for cargo bikes in city districts.

Environment - 08.03.2021
Unique sensor network for measuring greenhouse gases
Unique sensor network for measuring greenhouse gases
MUCCnet allows quantification of urban greenhouse gas emissions Munich is home to the world's first fully automated sensor network for measuring urban greenhouse gas emissions based on ground-based remote sensing of the atmosphere. It has been developed by scientists in the group of Jia Chen, Professor of Environmental Sensing and Modeling at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 08.03.2021
Ideal for Analysing Planetary Atmospheres
Ideal for Analysing Planetary Atmospheres
By analysing signals from the star Gliese 486, an international research team has discovered a hot rocky exoplanet with remains of a planetary atmosphere. Due to its characteristics, it is ideally suited for testing future observational methods of studying distant planetary atmospheres. The discovery of Gliese 486b, as the new planet has been named, was made possible by the CARMENES instrument.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 05.03.2021
Glowing hot super-Earth nearby
Glowing hot super-Earth nearby
Research team with Göttingen University participation plans to test atmospheric models of the rocky planet In the past two and a half decades, astronomers have discovered thousands of exoplanets made of gas, ice and rock. Only a few of them are Earth-like. Studying their atmospheres with the instruments currently available is a major challenge.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 01.03.2021
Understanding the Spatial and Temporal Dimensions of Landscape Dynamics
Heidelberg geoinformation scientists develop new computer-based method to analyse topographic changes The Earth's surface is subject to continual changes that dynamically shape natural landscapes. Global phenomena like climate change play a role, as do short-term, local events of natural or human origin.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.02.2021
Wolves prefer to feed on the wild side
Wolves prefer to feed on the wild side
Research team studies feeding behaviour of wild predators in Mongolia When there is a choice, wolves in Mongolia prefer to feed on wild animals rather than grazing livestock. This is the discovery by a research team from the University of Göttingen and the Senckenberg Museum Görlitz. Previous studies had shown that the diet of wolves in inland Central Asia consists mainly of grazing livestock, which could lead to increasing conflict between nomadic livestock herders and wild predatory animals like wolves.

Materials Science - Environment - 18.02.2021
Three Forward-Looking Research Fields Dominate Battery Research
Smartphones and laptops constantly in use, smart building technology, the expansion of renewable energies, networked charging stations for electric cars or the debate surrounding air taxis: sustainable, safe and efficient batteries are the basis of our lives as well as paving the way for the future.

Environment - 15.02.2021
Record sunshine during first COVID-19 lockdown largely caused by unusual weather
Exceptional weather conditions were mainly responsible for high solar radiation, not the aerosol reduction due to the shutdown of industry and reduced traffic in the first lockdown / International research team continues to develop climate simulations that take into account influences of the COVID-19 pandemic Dry and cloudless weather was mainly responsible for the unusually high solar irradiance in western Europe during the spring of 2020, not the reduction in aerosol emissions due to the first lockdown.

Environment - 04.02.2021
Forests of the world in 3D
Forests of the world in 3D
Research team led by the University of Göttingen analyses complexity of forest structure Primeval forests are of great importance for biodiversity and global carbon and water cycling. The three-dimensional structure of forests plays an important role here because it influences processes of gas and energy exchange with the atmosphere, whilst also providing habitats for numerous species.

Environment - 02.02.2021
Flower diversity may mitigate insecticide effects on wild bees
Flower diversity may mitigate insecticide effects on wild bees
Research team led by the University of Göttingen emphasizes the benefits of diversifying flower resources A higher diversity of flowering plants increases the breeding success of wild bees and may help compensate for the negative effects of insecticides. This is what researchers from the Universities of Göttingen and Hohenheim, as well as the Julius Kühn Institute, have found in a large-scale experimental study.