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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
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Life Sciences



Results 41 - 60 of 600.


Life Sciences - Paleontology - 02.08.2021
Evolution of walking leaves
Evolution of walking leaves
Göttingen research team creates phylogenetic tree of leaf insects An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has studied the evolution of the walking leaves. Walking leaves belong to the stick insects and ghost insects that, unlike their approximately 3,000 branch-like relatives, do not imitate twigs.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.07.2021
Solar-powered microbes to feed the world?
International research team shows that protein from microbes uses a fraction of the resources of conventional farming Microbes have played a key role in our food and drinks - from cheese to beer - for millennia but their impact on our nutrition may soon become even more important. The world is facing growing food challenges as the human population continues to increase alongside its demand for resource intensive animal products.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.07.2021
New strategy against sepsis
New strategy against sepsis
Some cases of bloodstream infections are mild, but many have a fatal outcome - the reasons for these differences have remained in the dark despite decades of research. Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence "Controlling Microbes to Fight Infections" (CMFI), the Interfaculty Institute of Microbiology and Infection Medicine Tübingen (IMIT) at the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have now discovered a possible cause and on this basis developed a new experimental strategy to combat bacterial sepsis.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.07.2021
Energy for undisturbed rest
Energy for undisturbed rest
07/29/2021 In the fruit fly Drosophila, a hormone helps to balance rest and activity. This is shown by a new study of a research team led by the University of Würzburg. Might humans have a hormone with comparable function? Searching for food, eating, resting: in rough terms, this is the rhythm of life that many animals follow.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.07.2021
New regulators of the aging process
New regulators of the aging process
The attachment of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins (ubiquitination) regulates numerous biological processes, including signal transduction and metabolism / Scientists at the University of Cologne discover the link to aging and longevity / Publication in 'Nature'. Scientists have discovered that the protein ubiquitin plays an important role in the regulation of the aging process.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.07.2021
Model developed to predict the effect of antibody treatment in HIV infection
The dosage of broadly neutralizing antibodies determines the ability for virus replication / findings can contribute to design HIV therapy that can durably suppress the virus A Cologne-based research collaboration has found a way to predict the effect of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) on the growth rate of HIV-1.

Life Sciences - 23.07.2021
Animals are better sprinters
An interdisciplinary group of scientists from the universities of Cologne, Koblenz, Tübingen, and Stuttgart has studied the characteristics determining the maximum running speed in animals. The model they developed explains why humans cannot keep up with the fastest sprinters in the animal kingdom. Based on these calculations, the giant spider Shelob from 'The Lord of the Rings' would have reached a maximum speed of 60 km/h.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2021
Cancer development is influenced by tissue type
Cancer development is influenced by tissue type
Why identical mutations cause different types of cancer Why do alterations of certain genes cause cancer only in specific organs of the human body? Scientists have now demonstrated that cells originating from different organs are differentially susceptible to activating mutations in cancer drivers: The same mutation in precursor cells of the pancreas or the bile duct leads to fundamental different outcomes.

Life Sciences - Physics - 15.07.2021
The virus trap
The virus trap
Hollow nano-objects made of DNA could trap viruses and render them harmless To date, there are no effective antidotes against most virus infections. An interdisciplinary research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed a new approach: they engulf and neutralize viruses with nano-capsules tailored from genetic material using the DNA origami method.

Life Sciences - 14.07.2021
Genome studies: more is not always better
Genome studies: more is not always better
07/14/2021 The characteristics of plants of the same species can have different genetic causes depending on their origin. This is shown by a recent study at the University of Würzburg. What the fruit fly is to zoologists, the thale cress is to botanists. The widespread herb with the botanical name Arabidopsis thaliana serves them as a model organism from which knowledge can be gained for other plants.

Life Sciences - 12.07.2021
Starvation and other Stresses: Internal Sensor in Cells Coordinates Cellular Stress Response
Scientists in Cologne have discovered an important role for the protein complex mTORC1 that centrally regulates cell communication. The findings may lead to the development of new treatment methods in the future.

Life Sciences - 09.07.2021
Remote Control for Plants
Remote Control for Plants
Plant researchers have a potent new tool at disposal: Advances, a research team from Würzburg shows how to close the stomata of leaves using light pulses. Plants have microscopically small pores on the surface of their leaves, the stomata. With their help, they regulate the influx of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.07.2021
Stiffness of skin tissue determines the renewal capacity of stem cells
Stiffness of skin tissue determines the renewal capacity of stem cells
Old and young skin stem cells are both capable of renewing the skin and its hair follicles. A slower renewal turnover of aged skin and its hair follicles may be caused by the decreased elasticity of skin tissues surrounding the stem cells / New insights into the causes of aging published in 'Nature Cell Biology' An international team of researchers from the Universities of Cologne and Helsinki have discovered that the ability of stem cells to proliferate and renew organs is regulated by the stiffness of the surrounding tissue.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.07.2021
Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Climatic changes are increasingly giving rise to major fires on peatlands in the northern hemisphere, which release massive quantities of carbon dioxide. However, the biomass of the peatland is not entirely consumed by fire, some turns to charcoal in the absence of air. Now, Dr. Tianran Sun and Professor Lars Angenent from Environmental Biotechnology at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with colleagues at Cornell University in the USA have discovered that the carbonized biomass reduces production of the methane gases naturally occurring in the peat soil.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.07.2021
MHH fills important gap in lung research
MHH fills important gap in lung research
For the first time, a team of scientists clearly demonstrates the existence of lipofibroblasts in human luectron microscope In medical research, animal models are used to clarify the development of diseases and to develop suitable therapies. In order to be able to transfer the results to humans, however, it must be ensured that the cell types and molecular signalling pathways studied in detail actually occur in our bodies.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 07.07.2021
Obstacles on the racetrack of life
Obstacles on the racetrack of life
mRNA plays a key role in the conversion of genetic information from DNA to proteins. Their production is a delicate process. A research team at the University of Würzburg has now identified a crucial factor. The corona pandemic has ensured that the term "mRNA" is now also known to a large public beyond laboratories and lecture halls.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2021
Anti-tumor agent from the intestine
Anti-tumor agent from the intestine
Certain metabolites of bacteria from the intestine make immune cells more aggressive as a new study conducted by scientists from Würzburg and Marburg reveals. The findings could help improve cancer therapies. It is believed to be involved in the development of chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases, to trigger diabetes, to be responsible for obesity, even neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's could have their causes here - not to mention depressions and autistic disorders.

Life Sciences - 06.07.2021
Acid Sensor Discovered in Plants
Acid Sensor Discovered in Plants
If plants are flooded, they lack oxygen and their cells over-acidify. A sensor protein detects this and triggers a stress response. Researchers have now presented details about this topic in the journal Current Biology. Climate change is causing increased flooding and prolonged waterlogging in northern Europe, but also in many other parts of the world.

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 05.07.2021
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Discovery from Unicorn Cave in Lower Saxony sheds new light on ancestors' cognitive abilities Since the discovery of the first fossil remains in the 19 th century, the image of the Neanderthal has been one of a primitive hominin. People have known for a long time that Neanderthals were able to effectively fashion tools and weapons.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.06.2021
Protein balance in the reproductive system can prevent disease
Protein balance in the reproductive system can prevent disease
Scientists from the University of Cologne found that the balance status of proteins (protein homeostasis) of germline cells influences protein aggregation in other tissues by long-distance signaling Publication in 'Science Advances' A recent study shows that a healthy reproductive system can prevent disease-related protein accumulation in distant tissues, such as neurons, and alteration of mitochondria - the power plants of cells.