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Life Sciences - Health - 21.02.2024
Possible trigger for autoimmune diseases discovered
Possible trigger for autoimmune diseases discovered
Immune cells must learn not to attack the body itself. A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) has discovered a previously unknown mechanism behind this: other immune cells, the B cells, contribute to the "training" of the T cells in the thymus gland.

Computer Science - Health - 21.02.2024
Artificial intelligence recognizes patterns in behaviour
Artificial intelligence recognizes patterns in behaviour
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the University Hospital Bonn and the University of Bonn have created an open-source platform known as A-SOiD that can learn and predict user-defined behaviors, just from video. The results of the study have now been published in the journal "Nature Methods".

Life Sciences - Health - 21.02.2024
'Ways of decomposing chemicals may be developed in just a few decades' time'
’Ways of decomposing chemicals may be developed in just a few decades’ time’
Microbiologist Bodo Philipp on the adaptability of micro-organisms and the benefits and risks for humans A team headed by Prof. Bodo Philipp and Dr. Johannes Holert from the Institute of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology has found bacteria in Münster's wastewater which can completely decompose a substance called "TRIS" (tris hydroxymethyl aminomethane), and the researchers were able to throw light on the metabolic pathway.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.02.2024
False alarm of the immune system during muscle disease
False alarm of the immune system during muscle disease
Researchers at the University Hospitals of Dresden and Bonn of the DFG Transregio 237 and from the Cluster of Excellence ImmunoSensation2 at the University of Bonn have made progress clarifying why patients with myotonic dystrophy 2 have a higher tendency to develop autoimmune diseases. Their goal is to understand the development of the disease, and their research has provided new, potential therapeutic targets.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.02.2024
Small ribonucleic acid with a big impact
Small ribonucleic acid with a big impact
Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the most common and most dangerous bacterial pathogens impacting humans, causing infections of the gastrointestinal tract, pneumonia, wound infections and even blood poisoning. With the aim of discovering therapeutically exploitable weaknesses in Klebsiella, a research team from the Balance of the Microverse Cluster of Excellence at the University of Jena has taken a close look at the molecular biology of the bacteria and was able to uncover the importance of a small, non-coding ribonucleic acid (sRNA for short) for the gene regulation of K. pneumoniae.

Health - Psychology - 19.02.2024
Physical activity counteracts the negative consequences of being alone
Physical activity counteracts the negative consequences of being alone
Physical activity in everyday life has the potential to compensate for the negative consequences of being alone on well-being - especially in psychologically and neurobiologically vulnerable people. Social isolation and loneliness are major societal problems. Their negative impact on mental health has been exacerbated worldwide by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Psychology - Health - 19.02.2024
Schema therapy is effective for treating severe depression
Schema therapy is effective for treating severe depression
In an uniquely extensive study, researchers were able to demonstrate the clinical benefits of schema therapy in the context of inpatient treatment. This therapy is therefore a promising alternative for the treatment of severe depression. Schema therapy is increasingly being used as a psychotherapeutic method.

Health - Innovation - 15.02.2024
Digitalisation in the healthcare system
Research team at the University of Göttingen aims to overcome digital barriers in the healthcare sector Digitalisation offers enormous opportunities within the healthcare sector: The evaluation of radiological image files using artificial intelligence can reduce the workload of radiologists, while the electronic maternity pass can improve the care of mothers-to-be.

Health - Environment - 14.02.2024
Why do(n't) people support being nudged towards healthier diets?
Why do(n’t) people support being nudged towards healthier diets?
Researchers investigate how individual characteristics and the design of food choice -nudges- influence support for their adoption You may not realise it, but -nudge- has been used by businesses, policy-makers and governments for years to prod the public into making different choices. Small changes in our environment can -nudge- us into different behaviours without restricting the options available to us.

Health - 08.02.2024
WHO Collaborating Centre for Health Literacy established
WHO Collaborating Centre for Health Literacy established
TUM coordinates global research on health literacy The World Health Organization (WHO) has established a new collaborating center at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The center will develop a global survey to learn more about people's ability to use health information. Member states may use this survey to determine their population's degree of health literacy.

Health - 08.02.2024
More heart attacks in rural areas
Core problem of urban-rural divide is not a lack of emergency care for heart attacks, but poorer disease prevention in rural areas In Germany, more people aged 65 and over die from heart attacks in rural areas than in cities. Contrary to popular belief, this is probably not due to poorer emergency medical care, but because more people suffer heart attacks in rural areas. However, the protection of patients' personal data makes it difficult to announce specific recommendations for action in Germany.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.02.2024
Bacteria increase risk of skin inflammation during radiotherapy
Bacteria increase risk of skin inflammation during radiotherapy
Cancer treatment: possible trigger for radiodermatitis identified During radiotherapy, some cancer patients develop radiodermatitis, a severe inflammation of the skin. A recent study suggests that skin bacteria play an essential role in this: Breast cancer patients whose skin microbiome was disturbed prior to treatment also developed radiodermatitis.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.02.2024
The Influence of the Cellular Environment on Vision
The Influence of the Cellular Environment on Vision
The environment of retinal nerve cells plays a crucial role in the processing of visual signals. The processing of visual information begins with a targeted and balanced communication between nerve cells in the retina via synapses. Proteins in the vicinity of nerve cells play an important role in the development, maturation, and function of these synapses.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2024
Neuromodulation: Ultrasound Leads to Braver Behavior in Situations of Mental Conflict
Neuromodulation: Ultrasound Leads to Braver Behavior in Situations of Mental Conflict
Psychologists at the University of Würzburg have investigated the extent to which neuromodulation of the brain with ultrasound waves influences people's behavior. The results can also be used as a basis for therapeutic purposes. When a new opportunity opens up for people, there are some who tend to take the pessimistic view: "It's no good anyway!".

Life Sciences - Health - 01.02.2024
Zebrafish Navigate to Find Their Comfortable Temperature
Zebrafish Navigate to Find Their Comfortable Temperature
Researchers from Bonn and Munich also find "thermostat" in the animals' brains Zebrafish are smaller than your little finger, with a brain no more than half the size of a pinhead. Yet these animals possess an efficient navigation system that enables them to find their way back to spots in the water where the temperature suits them.

Health - Pharmacology - 31.01.2024
Precursor of Cholesterol Protects Cells From Ferroptosis
Precursor of Cholesterol Protects Cells From Ferroptosis
A precursor of cholesterol, previously categorised as harmful, can protect cancer cells from cell death. This finding, published in Nature, opens new doors for cancer research. In a groundbreaking study, a team led by Würzburg Professor José Pedro Friedmann Angeli has shown that the cholesterol precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) plays a crucial role as an antioxidant: it integrates into the cell membranes and protects the cells by preventing a certain type of cell death, known as ferroptosis.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2024
News on drug-induced skin swelling
News on drug-induced skin swelling
Bonn researchers identify novel risk locus in the genome for ACE inhibitor-induced angioedema Angioedema is a rare but potentially life-threatening adverse reaction to ACE inhibitors. In a joint analysis of eight European study collectives, researchers from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB), the University of Bonn and the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) for the first time conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with more than 1,000 affected individuals.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2024
Bacterium uses toxin to kill insects
Bacterium uses toxin to kill insects
Max Planck researchers from Dortmund reveal the first-ever detailed structure of the bacterial toxin Mcf1   During infection insect-killing bacteria typically release toxins to slay their hosts. The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens , for example, pumps insect larvae full of the lethal 'Makes caterpillars floppy 1' (Mcf1) toxin, leading them to first become droopy and then dead.

Health - Pharmacology - 30.01.2024
Elimination of drug resistance
Bonn researchers discover that a protein from fatty tissue precursors is the cause of treatment failure and develop a solution strategy Urothelial carcinomas are malignant tumors that originate from the epithelium that lines the bladder and ureters, for example. They are still one of the most common types of cancer in Europe, especially in men.

Health - Chemistry - 23.01.2024
How the coronavirus defends itself against our immune system
How the coronavirus defends itself against our immune system
Research team identifies protective switch in SARS-CoV-2 virus protein . With over 700 million people infected and almost seven million dead, the global spread of Covid-19 has been the most devastating pandemic of the 21st century to date. Vaccines and medication against the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus have been able to mitigate the course of the disease in many people and contain the pandemic.
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