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Electroengineering



Results 1 - 20 of 37.


Physics - Electroengineering - 10.01.2023
Milestone for light-driven electronics
Milestone for light-driven electronics
Within the framework of the Würzburg-Dresden Cluster of Excellence ct.qmat, excitons were generated in a topological insulator for the first time. A breakthrough in quantum research, based on material design from Würzburg. An international team of scientists collaborating within the Würzburg-Dresden Cluster of Excellence ct.qmat has achieved a breakthrough in quantum research - the first detection of excitons (electrically neutral quasiparticles) in a topological insulator.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.12.2022
Long-range information transport in antiferromagnets
Long-range information transport in antiferromagnets
Antiferromagnets are suitable for transporting spin waves over long distances Smaller, faster, more powerful: The demands on microelectronic devices are high and are constantly increasing. However, if chips, processors and the like are based on electricity, there are limits to miniaturization. Physicists are therefore working on alternative ways of transporting information, such as about spin waves, also called magnons, for example.

Physics - Electroengineering - 21.11.2022
Long-range information transport in antiferromagnets
Long-range information transport in antiferromagnets
Physicists at JGU discovered: Antiferromagnets are suitable for transporting spin waves over long distances Smaller, faster, more powerful: The demands on microelectronic devices are high and continue to rise. However, if chips, processors and the like are based on electric current, there are limits to miniaturization.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 03.11.2022
New material will make locally flexible diodes possible
New material will make locally flexible diodes possible
Researchers find new material with significant potential for electronics applications Diodes allow directed flows of current. Without them, modern electronics would be inconceivable. Until now, they had to be made out of two materials with different characteristics. A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered a material that makes it possible to create a diode with a simple change in temperature.

Physics - Electroengineering - 11.08.2022
Unexpected quantum effects in natural double-layer graphene
Unexpected quantum effects in natural double-layer graphene
International research team led by Göttingen University controls interaction of charge carriers An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has detected novel quantum effects in high-precision studies of natural double-layer graphene and has interpreted them together with the University of Texas at Dallas using their theoretical work.

Electroengineering - 09.05.2022
Bright, stable, and easy to recycle lighting
A low-cost and easy-to-manufacture lighting technology can be made with light-emitting electrochemical cells. Such cells are thin-film electronic and ionic devices that generate light after a low voltage is applied. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Turin have now used extensive data analysis to create first-class electrochemical cells from copper complexes that emit blue and white light.

Physics - Electroengineering - 03.03.2022
Waves on circular paths
Waves on circular paths
Just as electrons flow through an electrical conductor, magnetic excitations can travel through certain materials. Such excitations, known in physics as "magnons" in analogy to the electron, could transport information much more easily than electrical conductors. An international research team has now made an important discovery on the road to such components, which could be highly energy-efficient and considerably smaller.

Physics - Electroengineering - 11.02.2022
Kagome Metals Baffle Science
Kagome Metals Baffle Science
Toward a new kind of superconductivity: An international team of physicists finds joint appearance of intricate quantum phenomena. Toward a new kind of superconductivity: In the past four years scientists have discovered metals whose crystal structure mimics that of a traditional Japanese woven bamboo pattern: kagome metals.

Innovation - Electroengineering - 11.02.2022
TU Ilmenau develops resource-efficient energy distribution network for Germany
TU Ilmenau develops resource-efficient energy distribution network for Germany
In the spirit of the energy transition, TU Ilmenau is developing a resource-efficient power distribution grid for Germany. Such a power grid, based on direct current technology, will be specifically tailored to the increasing use of renewable energy generated in a large number of decentralized plants and will offer significantly higher operational reliability than the current grid.

Physics - Electroengineering - 26.11.2021
Programmable Interaction between Quantum Magnets
Programmable Interaction between Quantum Magnets
The forces between particles, atoms, molecules, or even macroscopic objects like magnets are determined by the interactions of nature. For example, two closely lying bar magnets realign themselves under the influence of magnetic forces. A team led by Matthias Weidemüller and Dr Gerhard Zürn at the Center for Quantum Dynamics of Heidelberg University has now succeeded in its aim to change not only the strength but also the nature of the interaction between microscopic quantum magnets, known as spins.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.08.2021
Qubits Under Pressure
Qubits Under Pressure
A new type of atomic sensor made of boron nitride is presented by researchers in "Nature Communications". The sensor is based on a qubit in the crystal lattice and is superior to comparable sensors. An artificially created spin defect (qubit) in a crystal lattice of boron nitride is suitable as a sensor enabling the measurement of different changes in its local environment.

Physics - Electroengineering - 16.12.2020
Information transport via magnons
Information transport via magnons
Pseudospin in antiferromagnets: new perspectives for information technologies Elementary particles carry an intrinsic angular momentum known as their spin. For an electron, the spin can take only two particular values relative to a quantization axis, letting us denote them as spin-up and spin-down electrons.

Physics - Electroengineering - 23.11.2020
Controlling fully integrated nanodiamonds
Controlling fully integrated nanodiamonds
Using modern nanotechnology, it is possible nowadays to produce structures which have a feature sizes of just a few nanometres. This world of the most minute particles - also known as quantum systems - makes possible a wide range of technological applications, in fields which include magnetic field sensing, information processing, secure communication or ultra-precise time keeping.

Physics - Electroengineering - 24.09.2020
The Return of the Spin Echo
The Return of the Spin Echo
If the spins of phosphorus atoms in silicon are cleverly excited with microwave pulses, a so-called spin echo signal can be detected after a certain time. Surprisingly, this spin echo does not occur only once, but a whole series of echoes can be detected.

Physics - Electroengineering - 11.06.2020
Macroscopic quantum interference in an ultra-pure metal
Macroscopic quantum interference in an ultra-pure metal
That visible light holds the character of a wave can be demonstrated in simple optics experiments, or directly witnessed when rainbows appear in the sky. Although the subtle laws of quantum mechanics, that is, wave mechanics, ultimately govern all the processes of electron transportelectrons in solids, their wave-like nature of the electrons is not often apparent to the casual observer.

Physics - Electroengineering - 24.04.2020
Bose-Einstein condensate: magnetic particles behave repulsively
Bose-Einstein condensate: magnetic particles behave repulsively
Data transmission that works by means of magnetic waves instead of electric currents - for many scientists, this is the basis of future technologies that will make transmission faster and individual components smaller and more energy-efficient. Magnons, the particles of magnetism, serve as moving information carriers.

Physics - Electroengineering - 22.11.2019
New method for using spin waves in magnetic materials
New method for using spin waves in magnetic materials
Smaller, faster, more energy-efficient - this is the goal that developers of electronic devices have been working towards for years. In order to be able to miniaturize individual components of mobile phones or computers for example, magnetic waves are currently regarded as promising alternatives to conventional data transmission functioning by means of electric currents.

Physics - Electroengineering - 24.10.2019
The quantum internet is within reach
The quantum internet is within reach
An international team headed by physicists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has, for the first time ever, experimentally implemented secure quantum communication in the microwave band in a local quantum network. The new architecture represents a crucial step on the road to distributed quantum computing.

Physics - Electroengineering - 23.10.2019
Fast internet anytime and anywhere
Fast internet anytime and anywhere
The continuously growing need for higher data rates as well as globally available broadband internet requires innovative technology developments and the exploitation of a new electromagnetic spectrum. In the scope of R&D projects funded by the German Aerospace Center, researchers at the University of Stuttgart have developed a high-performance technology platform to exploit the frequency spectrum in the so-called E-band at 71-86 GHz.

Electroengineering - 08.07.2019
No escape for mosquitoes
No escape for mosquitoes
Venus flytraps are capable of detecting the movements of even the smallest insects. This mechanism protects the plant against starving from hyperactivity as a new study conducted by scientists from Würzburg and Cambridge reveals. Physically bound to a specific location, plants have to devise special ways to secure their supply of vital nutrients.