News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

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Earth Sciences



Results 1 - 20 of 32.


Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 11.06.2019
Dwarf planet Ceres: a new form of volcanism found
Dwarf planet Ceres: a new form of volcanism found
An international research team solves the mystery of how the mountain Ahuna Mons on Ceres was probably formed / Study in "Nature Geoscience" The scientists could hardly believe their eyes when they first saw this formation on the images acquired by their Framing Camera on board the Dawn space probe: a symmetrical mountain over 4000 metres tall and with steep, smooth sides rising over the crater-strewn surface of.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 16.05.2019
Geologists discover previously unknown region of the Earth's mantle
Geologists discover previously unknown region of the Earth’s mantle
The Bermuda Islands - a very special terrain in the middle of the western Atlantic Ocean, not only for its white beaches, but also because the archipelago is at the top of a 4,570-metre high volcano that died out about 30 million years ago. An international team of researchers has now taken a closer look at this geological peculiarity and geochemically examined the magma rock under Bermuda for the first time.

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 24.04.2019
Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur on finding a reptile footprint in the Antarctic
Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur on finding a reptile footprint in the Antarctic
Around three years ago, researchers on an Antarctic expedition, including Münster University palaeobotanist Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur , made an incredible discovery in northern Victoria Land. They found the 200 million-year-old footprint of an extinct reptile. The researchers have now published their findings from the hand-sized footprint in the journal “Polar Research”.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 20.02.2019
A Volcanic Binge And Its Frosty Hangover
A Volcanic Binge And Its Frosty Hangover
A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history - the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago. Researchers from Heidelberg University and colleagues from Mexico have discovered remnants of such a large igneous province that resulted from vast lava flows.

Earth Sciences - 25.10.2018
The formation of large meteorite craters is unraveled
About 66 million years ago, a meteorite hit the Earth of the Yucatan Peninsula in what is now Mexico. This event triggered a mass extinction that eradicated approximately 75 percent of all species and ended the era of dinosaurs. Like Ulrich Riller of the Institute of Geology of the University of Hamburg and co-workers report in "Nature", the hitherto mysterious formation of the crater and its mountaneous peak ring.

Earth Sciences - 14.08.2018
Mountains in motion
Mountains in motion
The Alps are on the go: The mountain range drifts northwards an average of one-half millimeter every year and rises 1.8 millimeters. However, there are strong regional variances. In order to follow these movements, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have evaluated measurements made by more than 300 GPS antennas over a period of twelve years.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.07.2018
New study puts a figure on sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves' collapse
New study puts a figure on sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves’ collapse
An international team of scientists has shown how much sea level would rise if Larsen C and George VI, two Antarctic ice shelves at risk of collapse, were to break up. While Larsen C has received much attention due to the break-away of a trillion-tonne iceberg from it last summer, its collapse would contribute only a few millimetres to sea-level rise.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 12.07.2018
Mediterranean Climate as pacemaker for Glacier Formation in Europe
Ice ages are recurring phenomena in Earth's recent geological history, and the resulting glacier advances significantly shaped the European landscape. An international research team led by Dr Stefanie Kaboth from the Institute of Earth Sciences at Heidelberg University has now shown that the extent of glaciation in Western Europe was largely driven by the advection of warm seawater towards Europe's Atlantic coast, which raised precipitation on the continent.

Earth Sciences - 22.06.2018
Polar ice may be softer than we thought
Polar ice may be softer than we thought
Tübingen and international researchers investigate ice flow speed in northern Greenland, correcting models predicting sea level change Ice is a material that can flow like a very viscous liquid. In the polar ice sheets, it flows towards the oceans under its own weight. Knowing how fast the ice flows is of crucial importance to predict future sea level rises, particularly under changing climate conditions.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.04.2018
Possible for the first time: reliable three-month forecasts for European winters
Possible for the first time: reliable three-month forecasts for European winters
Thanks to a novel method, the quality of seasonal forecasts for the winter in many parts of Europe can now be significantly improved. To date, reliable forecasts could mostly be made for the Tropics. A team led by Dr. Mikhail Dobrynin and Prof. Johanna Baehr from Universität Hamburg's Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN) has now released its findings in Geophysical Research Letters.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 22.11.2017
Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus
Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus
Heat from the friction of rocks caused by tidal forces could be the "engine" for the hydrothermal activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus. This presupposes that the moon has a porous core that allows water from the overlying ocean to seep in, where the tidal friction exerted on the rocks heats it. This shows a computer simulation based on observations from the European-American Cassini-Huygens mission.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 10.11.2017
New insights into the 2004 Sumatra megathrust earthquake
New insights into the 2004 Sumatra megathrust earthquake
Research news Scientists in Munich have completed the first detailed simulation of the Sumatra earthquake that triggered a devastating tsunami on Christmas 2004. The results of the largest-ever rupture dynamics simulation of an earthquake offer new insights into the underlying geophysical processes. It was performed on the SuperMUC supercomputer at the Leibniz Supercomputing Center (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences in Munich.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 31.08.2017
Find of Human Bones in South Mexico: Stalagmite Reveals Their Age as 13,000
Find of Human Bones in South Mexico: Stalagmite Reveals Their Age as 13,000
A prehistoric human skeleton found on the Yucatán Peninsula is at least 13,000 years old and most likely dates from a glacial period at the end of the most recent ice age, the late Pleistocene. A German-Mexican team of researchers led by Wolfgang Stinnesbeck and Arturo González González has now dated the fossil skeleton based on a stalagmite that grew on the hip bone.

Earth Sciences - 03.04.2017
New Indications of Gradual Decline of Dinosaurs before the End of the Cretaceous Period
New Indications of Gradual Decline of Dinosaurs before the End of the Cretaceous Period
According to the latest research results of a German-Mexican team of geoscientists, the gradual decline of the dinosaurs and pterosaurs presumably came before the impact of the Chicxulub asteroid and the global mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period. Studies under the direction of Wolfgang Stinnesbeck of Heidelberg University and Eberhard Frey of the State Museum of Natural History Karlsruhe also indicate that bird species spread and diversified at the same time the dinosaurs disappeared.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 29.12.2016
Hidden Rivers Form Deep Down in the Earth’s Subsurface Layers
Findings of Study by Scientists from Freie Universität Berlin and Utrecht University Published in "Nature Geoscience" ‘ 444/2016 from Dec 29, 2016 Earth scientists from among others Utrecht University and Freie Universität Berlin have found new clues how water moves inside the Earth's deep subsurface layers and ultimately back to the surface through volcanic activity.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 11.11.2016
Life on Land Began 300 Million Years Earlier Than Previously Thought
Life on Land Began 300 Million Years Earlier Than Previously Thought
Geologists Found Traces of Microorganisms in Rock Layer Several Billions of Years Old / Findings Published in "Geology" ‘ 389/2016 from Nov 11, 2016 According to a recent study, life on Earth took hold on land at least 3.2 billion years ago - 300 million years earlier than previously thought.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.09.2016
Drones for butterfly conservation
Drones for butterfly conservation
Research news High-resolution aerial Photographs provides information that is both up-to-date and tailored for the task at hand?information that could previously only be obtained by observations in the field and only for a limited spatial area. For the very first time, a team of scientists led by Jan C. Habel at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has used drones to predict suitable microhabitats for the larvae of endangered butterfly species (larval habitats), recently published in Landscape Ecology.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 02.09.2016
Researchers report on findings from Dawn space mission
Researchers report on findings from Dawn space mission
In 2015 the Dawn spacecraft reached the asteroid Ceres, the largest celestial body in the so-called asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. The data collected by Dawn will make it possible for scientists to analyse the geological properties of Ceres and understand its origins. The latest issue of the "Science" journal contains reports by several international teams of researchers on their findings.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 24.08.2016
283 from Aug 24, 2016 Climate Change Already Started 180 Years Ago Study Indicates Industrial Revolution Had Noticeable Impact on Global Warming
Study Indicates Industrial Revolution Had Noticeable Impact on Global Warming ‘ 283/2016 from Aug 24, 2016 An international research team has now found out that climate change already began 180 years ago, much earlier than believed up to now. To determine the earliest time of global warming, the scientists studied the so-called natural climate archives of the northern and southern hemispheres, both on land and in the oceans, from the past 500 years.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.08.2016
New Emmy Noether Group to Investigate Ocean Currents
New Emmy Noether Group to Investigate Ocean Currents
A new Emmy Noether junior research group at Heidelberg University's Institute of Earth Sciences will delve into the central questions of climate history. The research team led by Dr. Jörg Lippold will study the history of ocean currents over the last 30,000 years in an attempt to uncover key parameters for understanding future climatic changes.

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