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Earth Sciences - Environment - 23.07.2024 - Today
Hot Traces in Rock
Hot Traces in Rock
Rocks undergo changes over millions of years. Yet it is possible to extract information from them about the climate at the time of their formation. Fluids circulating underground change rocks over the course of time. These processes must be taken into account if they are to be used as a climate archive.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.07.2024
The dawn of the Antarctic ice sheets
The dawn of the Antarctic ice sheets
For the first time, the recovery of unique geological samples combined with sophisticated modelling provides surprising insights into when and where today's Antarctic ice sheet formed. In recent years global warming has left its mark on the Antarctic ice sheets. The "eternal" ice in Antarctica is melting faster than previously assumed, particularly in West Antarctica more than East Antarctica.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 04.07.2024
Grasses in the Fog: Plants Support Life in the Desert
Grasses in the Fog: Plants Support Life in the Desert
Researchers from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment (SHEP) at the University of Tübingen and the Senckenberg Natural History Museum in Görlitz have studied the role of the desert grass Stipagrostis sabulicola in the African Namib Desert. In their study, published in the journal Scientific Reports , they show that the plant is able to absorb moisture from fog events and thus forms an essential basis of an - altogether unexpectedly complex - food web in the drought-stricken landscape.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.06.2024
Tracking the Climate With the Help of Blue-Green Algae
Tracking the Climate With the Help of Blue-Green Algae
Led by the University of Bremen, RWTH paleoclimate researcher Professor Thorsten Bauersachs and colleagues have now published their results on the glaciation of West Antarctica in the journal Science Advances. It has been more than 30 million years since West Antarctica was last largely ice-free. In the last 30 million years, however, it has been extensively glaciated.

Earth Sciences - 29.05.2024
Visiting flowers and transporting pollen in fragmented landscapes
Visiting flowers and transporting pollen in fragmented landscapes
Research team compares wild bee networks at a small scale and at landscape level   Traditionally, interactions between plants and their pollinators are analysed on the basis of visits to flowers. A research team led by the University of Göttingen studied wild bees on chalk grassland. The researchers analysed both the networks showing visits to flowers and the networks where pollen was transported.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 15.05.2024
Iron-sulfur minerals bear witness to earliest life on earth
Iron-sulfur minerals bear witness to earliest life on earth
A team of researchers at the Universities of Tübingen and Göttingen has found that certain minerals with characteristic shapes could indicate the activity of bacteria in hydrothermal vents - or black smokers - in the deep ocean several billion years ago. This represents a major step in our understanding of the origin of life.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 09.05.2024
Rhizobial bacterium helps diatom to bind nitrogen
Rhizobial bacterium helps diatom to bind nitrogen
Newly discovered symbiosis probably plays a major role in marine nitrogen fixation Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology have discovered a new partnership between a marine diatom and a bacterium that can account for a large share of nitrogen fixation in vast regions of the ocean.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 25.03.2024
Scientific Drilling Unravels Historical Mystery Surrounding Santorini
Scientific Drilling Unravels Historical Mystery Surrounding Santorini
Santorini is one of the best-studied volcanic archipelagos in the world. An international drilling expedition has now for the first time used a scientific drill ship to explore and investigate the seafloor around the Greek volcanic island. The researchers have uncovered evidence of an underwater eruption in 726 CE, previously known only from historical records.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.03.2024
First global study of coastal seas as carbon dioxide reservoirs possible
First global study of coastal seas as carbon dioxide reservoirs possible
Coastal seas form a complex transition zone between the two largest CO2 sinks in the global carbon cycle: land and ocean. Ocean researchers have now succeeded for the first time in investigating the role of the coastal ocean in a seamless model representation. The team led by Dr. Moritz Mathis from the Cluster of Excellence for Climate Research CLICCS at Universität Hamburg and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon was able to show: The intensity of CO2 uptake is higher in coastal seas than in the open ocean.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 21.02.2024
High resolution techniques reveal clues in 3.5 billion-year-old biomass
High resolution techniques reveal clues in 3.5 billion-year-old biomass
Research team analyses organic material from the early Earth tracing its origin and composition To learn about the first organisms on our planet, researchers have to analyse the rocks of the early Earth. These can only be found in a few places on the surface of the Earth. The Pilbara Craton in Western Australia is one of these rare sites: there are rocks there that are around 3.5 billion years old containing traces of the microorganisms that lived at that time.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 24.01.2024
New pieces in the puzzle of first life on Earth
New pieces in the puzzle of first life on Earth
Research team discovers complex microbial communities in ecosystems over 3 billion years ago Microorganisms were the first forms of life on our planet. The clues are written in 3.5 billion-year-old rocks by geochemical and morphological traces, such as chemical compounds or structures that these organisms left behind.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 18.01.2024
Moon rocks with unique dust found
Moon rocks with unique dust found
Research team studies interaction of dust with boulders and discovers potentially anomalous rocks Our Earth's Moon is almost completely covered in dust. Unlike on Earth, this dust is not smoothed by wind and weather, but is sharp-edged and also electrostatically charged. This dust has been studied since the Apollo era at the end of the 1960s.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.01.2024
How microplastic travels into the Arctic
How microplastic travels into the Arctic
Microplastic fibers are settling substantially slower than spherical particles in the atmosphere How far microplastics travel in the atmosphere depends crucially on particle shape, according to a recent study by scientists at the University of Vienna and the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organisation in Göttingen: While spherical particles settle quickly, microplastic fibers stay in th eatmosphere much longer.

Earth Sciences - 15.01.2024
Scientists unravel the origin of Titanium-rich lunar basalts
Scientists unravel the origin of Titanium-rich lunar basalts
International research team measures isotopic composition of lunar rocks Their high Ti contents are ultimately believed to be derived from a distinct mineralogical layer formed as part of the unstable crystal pile that constituted the lunar interior following solidification of a magma ocean, shortly after Moon formation.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 15.01.2024
How humans cause earthquakes
How humans cause earthquakes
Geophysicists from Freie Universität Berlin among the researchers investigating human-induced earthquakes. It is common knowledge that humans have a big effect on the world and their natural environment. However, what may be less well-known is that humans can also induce earthquakes. Industrial activities such as geothermal energy production, fracking for oil and natural gas, and wastewater disposal can all lead to increased seismic activity that commonly takes the form of earthquakes.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 19.12.2023
New Findings on Rock Movements from the Earth’s Interior
Geologists from Heidelberg and Frankfurt simulate thermo-mechanical behaviour of a white schist from the Alps Movements of rocks from deep in the Earth to the surface could occur under different circumstances than previously thought, challenging our current understanding of plate tectonics and mountain-building.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.12.2023
How forests smell - a risk for the climate?
Plants emit odours for a variety of reasons, such as to communicate with each other, to deter herbivores or to respond to changing environmental conditions. An interdisciplinary team of researchers from Leipzig University, the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) carried out a study to investigate how biodiversity influences the emission of these substances.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space - 28.11.2023
Limitations of asteroid crater lakes as climate archives
Limitations of asteroid crater lakes as climate archives
Researchers led by Göttingen University determine factors for chemical development in crater lakes on Earth In southern Germany just north of the Danube, there lies a large circular depression between the hilly surroundings: the Nördlinger Ries. Almost 15 million years ago, an asteroid struck this spot.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.11.2023
Early Humans in the Paleolithic Age: More Than Just Game on the Menu
Early Humans in the Paleolithic Age: More Than Just Game on the Menu
In a study published in the journal "Scientific Reports," researchers from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment (SHEP) at the University of Tübingen show that early humans of the Middle Paleolithic had a more varied diet than previously assumed. The analysis of a site in the Zagros Mountains in Iran reveals that around 81,000 to 45,000 years ago, the local hominins hunted ungulates as well as tortoises and carnivores.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.11.2023
Recalculations - How Can We Evaluate the Quality of Global Water Models?
Recalculations - How Can We Evaluate the Quality of Global Water Models?
In a study recently published in "Nature Water", the Analysis of Hydrological Systems group at the University of Potsdam, together with an international team, investigates the extent to which global water models agree with each other and with measured data. Using a new evaluation approach, the researchers can show in which climate regions the models agree and where they differ.
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