news 2024

« BACK

Paleontology



Results 1 - 7 of 7.


Paleontology - 27.06.2024
How the Indo-Australian Archipelago became a biodiversity hotspot
How the Indo-Australian Archipelago became a biodiversity hotspot
The region with the greatest marine biodiversity on our planet is known as the Coral Triangle or Indo-Australian Archipelago. However, the detailed evolutionary history of this biodiversity hotspot is poorly understood. An international research team has reconstructed how biodiversity has developed over the past 40 million years.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 07.06.2024
Second great ape species discovered at Hammerschmiede fossil site
Second great ape species discovered at Hammerschmiede fossil site
An international team of researchers has discovered a previously unknown ape species in the Hammerschmiede clay pit in southern Germany. Buronius manfredschmidi was found close to the great ape Danuvius guggenmosi , known as "Udo". This was about 12 million years ago the first ape with adaptations for walking upright and made the Hammerschmiede excavation site famous.

Paleontology - Environment - 06.05.2024
Clawed animals lived in the hammer mill
Clawed animals lived in the hammer mill
From today's perspective, they look like a cross between a horse and a gorilla: clawed animals (Chalicotheriidae) had a massive body and a horse-like head; their arms were much longer than their legs and equipped with claws. They belonged to the group of odd-toed ungulates and are thus related to modern rhinoceroses, horses and tapirs.

Paleontology - 09.04.2024
Do some mysterious bones belong to gigantic ichthyosaurs?
Do some mysterious bones belong to gigantic ichthyosaurs?
A study carried out at the University of Bonn sheds light on a mystery that has puzzled paleontologists for 150 years Several similar large, fossilized bone fragments have been discovered in various regions across Western and Central Europe since the 19th century. The animal group to which they belonged is still the subject of much debate to this day.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 02.04.2024
Temple bones in the skulls of dinosaurs and humans alike were formed by feeding habits
Temple bones in the skulls of dinosaurs and humans alike were formed by feeding habits
Whether human or reptile: in the skull of most terrestrial vertebrates there is a gaping hole in the temple; in the case of most reptiles, there are two. Scientists have been looking for explanations for this for 150 years. A team of researchers from the University of Tübingen and Ruhr University Bochum has now shown that the forces acting on the skull change depending on how and where food is held, bitten and chewed in the mouth - and over millions of years, these factors lead to the formation of connections and openings in the skull.

Paleontology - 13.03.2024
Newly discovered: Fossil giant turtle named after Stephen King novel character
Newly discovered: Fossil giant turtle named after Stephen King novel character
An international research team led by Dr. Gabriel S. Ferreira from the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of has described a new species of giant turtle from the late Pleistocene.

Paleontology - Chemistry - 06.02.2024
Surprisingly vibrant colour of 12-million-year-old snail shells
Surprisingly vibrant colour of 12-million-year-old snail shells
Researchers provide world's first evidence of intact polyene pigments in fossils Snail shells are often colourful and strikingly patterned. This is due to pigments that are produced in special cells of the snail and stored in the shell in varying concentrations. Fossil shells, on the other hand, are usually pale and inconspicuous because the pigments are very sensitive and have already decomposed.