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Results 21 - 40 of 110.


Health - Life Sciences - 30.04.2024
New regulator of eating behaviour identified
New regulator of eating behaviour identified
The rapidly escalating prevalence of overweight and obesity poses a significant medical challenge worldwide. In addition to people's changing lifestyles, genetic factors also play a key role in the development of obesity. Scientists at Leipzig University and Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf have now identified a new regulator of eating behaviour.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.04.2024
Directly in the nose: antimicrobial peptide fights pathogenic bacteria
Directly in the nose: antimicrobial peptide fights pathogenic bacteria
Research team involving the University of Göttingen decodes molecular function . As humans, we are constantly accompanied by billions of microorganisms that live on our skin or in our airways in the form of our microbiome. The relationships between these microorganisms are a rich source of previously unknown metabolic products that are beneficial to humans.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.04.2024
Breakthrough in brown fat research
Breakthrough in brown fat research
Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark, the Novo Nordisk Center for Adipocyte Signaling (SDU), the University of Bonn and the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) have found a protein that is responsible for turning off brown fat activity. This new discovery could lead to a promising strategy for safely activating brown fat and tackling obesity and related health problems.

Life Sciences - 26.04.2024
What Happens in the Brain When We Decide About Money or Food
What Happens in the Brain When We Decide About Money or Food
Neuroscience researchers from Bochum confirm different strategies when choosing between primary and secondary rewards. The lever is impulsivity. People make decisions every day - from what to wear in the morning to what to watch on TV in the evening. But how do decisions differ when it comes to essential food and money? A neuroscientific research team at Ruhr University Bochum has investigated this question.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.04.2024
Antimicrobial Agents of the Future
Researchers the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research (HIRI) in Würzburg conducted the first systematic study of CRISPR-based antibiotics in Klebsiella pneumoniae. The antimicrobial potential of CRISPR-Cas systems is promising, yet how to best design or implement CRISPR nucleases remains poorly understood.

Life Sciences - 25.04.2024
Food in sight
Food in sight
What happens in the body when we are hungry and see and smell food? A team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research has now been able to show in mice that adaptations in the liver mitochondria take place after only a few minutes. Stimulated by the activation of a group of nerve cells in the brain, the mitochondria of the liver cells change and prepare the liver for the adaptation of the sugar metabolism.

Life Sciences - 24.04.2024
'Tree of Life' for Flowering Plants
’Tree of Life’ for Flowering Plants
Heidelberg bioscientists have contributed research knowledge on the evolution of cruciferous plants With their own botanical collection material and their research knowledge on the evolution of cruciferous plants, i.e. plants of the cabbage family, bioscientists at Heidelberg University have contributed to a large-scale international study that has produced a comprehensive "tree of life" for flowering plants.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.04.2024
Environmental changes influence microbial diversity
Environmental changes influence microbial diversity
Environmental changes influence microbial communities, which are crucial for the health of the earth and humans. For instance, altered eating habits with heavily processed foods can lead to disrupted gut flora, or intensive agricultural practices can disturb the carbon cycle in the soil, respectively.

Life Sciences - 18.04.2024
Does a Molecular Mechanism Protect against Traumatic Memories?
Does a Molecular Mechanism Protect against Traumatic Memories?
Neuroscientists identify effect of a protein that controls memories of fear-ridden events at the biological level A previously unknown molecular mechanism could protect the brain from traumatic memories and help prevent anxiety disorders at the biological level. A research team led by Dr Ana M. M.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 15.04.2024
An enzyme makes mushrooms 'magical'
An enzyme makes mushrooms ’magical’
An international research team has investigated the biosynthesis of psilocybin, the main ingredient of hallucinogenic mushrooms. They gained new insights into the structure and reaction mechanism of the enzyme PsiM. It plays a key role in the production of psilocybin. The results of the study were published in the journal "Nature Communications".

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.04.2024
Bumblebees don't care about pesticide cocktails
Bumblebees don’t care about pesticide cocktails
In their natural environment, wild bees are exposed to various pesticides that can have a potentially toxic effect. A study by the University of Würzburg has now shown that bumblebees are relatively resistant to these products. Bumblebees appear to be quite resistant to common pesticides. This is shown by a new study, the results of which have now been published by scientists from Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in the journal Environment International .

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 15.04.2024
Arabica coffee: New database to better identify more climate-resilient plants
Arabica coffee: New database to better identify more climate-resilient plants
As climate change threatens coffee farming, experts at Nestlé, the world's largest food company, are exploring how advanced data science and artificial intelligence can help select and breed more climate-resilient crops. Together with researchers from scientific institutions in Brazil, France, the US and elsewhere, they have published their latest findings in the journal Nature Genetics.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2024
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
Research team at the University of Freiburg discovers previously unknown gene that indirectly promotes photosynthesis Cyanobacteria - also called blue-green algae - are known as the "plants of the ocean" because they carry out photosynthesis on a gigantic scale, produce oxygen and extract the greenhouse gas CO2 from the environment.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2024
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
Research team at the University of Freiburg discovers a previously unknown gene that indirectly promotes photosynthesis Cyanobacteria are also known as blue-green algae and are considered the "plants of the ocean" because they photosynthesize on a gigantic scale, produce oxygen and extract the greenhouse gas CO2 from the environment.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.04.2024
Boron deficiency: oilseed rape reacts as with infection and pest infestation
Boron deficiency: oilseed rape reacts as with infection and pest infestation
Genetic mechanisms uncovered Boron deficiency has a devastating effect on oilseed rape and related plants. However, little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms. A study shows that the response to persistent or short-term acute boron deficiency is similar to that to pests and infections. The results lay the foundation for breeding plants that can better cope with boron deficiency and for avoiding related yield losses.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.04.2024
Study Lays the Basis for New Knowledge on Gastrointestinal Diseases
Study Lays the Basis for New Knowledge on Gastrointestinal Diseases
The transition from the esophagus to the stomach is a delicate region from a medical point of view, often associated with pathological disorders leading to cancer. An international research team has now gained new insights into this region. These pave the way for new prevention and treatment options.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.04.2024
High ozone levels could be a cause of insect decline
High ozone levels could be a cause of insect decline
The oxidant pollutant removes mating barriers between fly species and increases the occurrence of sterile hybrids In a recent study, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, show that ozone levels, such as those found in many places on hot summer days today, destroy the sex pheromones of fruit fly species.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.04.2024
Navigation software supports kidney research
Navigation software supports kidney research
Bonn researchers develop method for three-dimensional image processing to solve the mystery of kidney inflammation Many kidney diseases are manifested by protein in the urine. However, until now it was not possible to determine whether the protein excretion is caused by only a few, but severely damaged, or by many moderately damaged of the millions of small kidney filters, known as glomeruli.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 10.04.2024
Discovery of the first fractal molecule in nature
Discovery of the first fractal molecule in nature
Scientists found for the first time a natural protein that follows a mathematical pattern of self-similarity An international team of researchers led by groups from the Max Planck Institute in Marburg and the Philipps University in Marburg has stumbled upon the first regular molecular fractal in nature.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.04.2024
Attack and defence in the microverse
Attack and defence in the microverse
Viruses need hosts. Whether it's measles, the flu or coronavirus, viral pathogens cannot multiply or infect other organisms without the assistance of their hosts' cellular infrastructure. However, humans are not the only ones affected by viruses: animals, plants and even microorganisms can all serve as hosts.