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Life Sciences - Environment - 18.04.2024
Environmental changes influence microbial diversity
Environmental changes influence microbial diversity
Environmental changes influence microbial communities, which are crucial for the health of the earth and humans. For instance, altered eating habits with heavily processed foods can lead to disrupted gut flora, or intensive agricultural practices can disturb the carbon cycle in the soil, respectively.

Life Sciences - 18.04.2024
Does a Molecular Mechanism Protect against Traumatic Memories?
Does a Molecular Mechanism Protect against Traumatic Memories?
Neuroscientists identify effect of a protein that controls memories of fear-ridden events at the biological level A previously unknown molecular mechanism could protect the brain from traumatic memories and help prevent anxiety disorders at the biological level. A research team led by Dr Ana M. M.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 15.04.2024
An enzyme makes mushrooms 'magical'
An enzyme makes mushrooms ’magical’
An international research team has investigated the biosynthesis of psilocybin, the main ingredient of hallucinogenic mushrooms. They gained new insights into the structure and reaction mechanism of the enzyme PsiM. It plays a key role in the production of psilocybin. The results of the study were published in the journal "Nature Communications".

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.04.2024
Bumblebees don't care about pesticide cocktails
Bumblebees don’t care about pesticide cocktails
In their natural environment, wild bees are exposed to various pesticides that can have a potentially toxic effect. A study by the University of Würzburg has now shown that bumblebees are relatively resistant to these products. Bumblebees appear to be quite resistant to common pesticides. This is shown by a new study, the results of which have now been published by scientists from Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in the journal Environment International .

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 15.04.2024
Arabica coffee: New database to better identify more climate-resilient plants
Arabica coffee: New database to better identify more climate-resilient plants
As climate change threatens coffee farming, experts at Nestlé, the world's largest food company, are exploring how advanced data science and artificial intelligence can help select and breed more climate-resilient crops. Together with researchers from scientific institutions in Brazil, France, the US and elsewhere, they have published their latest findings in the journal Nature Genetics.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2024
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
Research team at the University of Freiburg discovers previously unknown gene that indirectly promotes photosynthesis Cyanobacteria - also called blue-green algae - are known as the "plants of the ocean" because they carry out photosynthesis on a gigantic scale, produce oxygen and extract the greenhouse gas CO2 from the environment.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2024
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
Research team at the University of Freiburg discovers a previously unknown gene that indirectly promotes photosynthesis Cyanobacteria are also known as blue-green algae and are considered the "plants of the ocean" because they photosynthesize on a gigantic scale, produce oxygen and extract the greenhouse gas CO2 from the environment.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.04.2024
Boron deficiency: oilseed rape reacts as with infection and pest infestation
Boron deficiency: oilseed rape reacts as with infection and pest infestation
Genetic mechanisms uncovered Boron deficiency has a devastating effect on oilseed rape and related plants. However, little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms. A study shows that the response to persistent or short-term acute boron deficiency is similar to that to pests and infections. The results lay the foundation for breeding plants that can better cope with boron deficiency and for avoiding related yield losses.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.04.2024
Study Lays the Basis for New Knowledge on Gastrointestinal Diseases
Study Lays the Basis for New Knowledge on Gastrointestinal Diseases
The transition from the esophagus to the stomach is a delicate region from a medical point of view, often associated with pathological disorders leading to cancer. An international research team has now gained new insights into this region. These pave the way for new prevention and treatment options.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.04.2024
High ozone levels could be a cause of insect decline
High ozone levels could be a cause of insect decline
The oxidant pollutant removes mating barriers between fly species and increases the occurrence of sterile hybrids In a recent study, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, show that ozone levels, such as those found in many places on hot summer days today, destroy the sex pheromones of fruit fly species.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.04.2024
Navigation software supports kidney research
Navigation software supports kidney research
Bonn researchers develop method for three-dimensional image processing to solve the mystery of kidney inflammation Many kidney diseases are manifested by protein in the urine. However, until now it was not possible to determine whether the protein excretion is caused by only a few, but severely damaged, or by many moderately damaged of the millions of small kidney filters, known as glomeruli.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 10.04.2024
Discovery of the first fractal molecule in nature
Discovery of the first fractal molecule in nature
Scientists found for the first time a natural protein that follows a mathematical pattern of self-similarity An international team of researchers led by groups from the Max Planck Institute in Marburg and the Philipps University in Marburg has stumbled upon the first regular molecular fractal in nature.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.04.2024
Attack and defence in the microverse
Attack and defence in the microverse
Viruses need hosts. Whether it's measles, the flu or coronavirus, viral pathogens cannot multiply or infect other organisms without the assistance of their hosts' cellular infrastructure. However, humans are not the only ones affected by viruses: animals, plants and even microorganisms can all serve as hosts.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.04.2024
Because they know what they are doing: virus, plant, fish
Because they know what they are doing: virus, plant, fish
Virus, plant, fish: three working groups give an insight into their research It is only 80 to 120 nanometers in size, but has a big impact: the influenza virus. The pathogen is usually responsible for the annual flu season by infecting healthy body cells, multiplying in them, being released from the cell again and infecting other cells.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.04.2024
How green algae and bacteria together contribute to climate protection
How green algae and bacteria together contribute to climate protection
Microscopic algae play a significant role in binding carbon dioxide and are therefore of great ecological importance. In nature, microalgae have coexisted with bacteria for many millions of years. Bacteria can either harm algae or promote their growth. A research team at Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany has now found a bacterium that forms a team with a green alga.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 02.04.2024
Temple bones in the skulls of dinosaurs and humans alike were formed by feeding habits
Temple bones in the skulls of dinosaurs and humans alike were formed by feeding habits
Whether human or reptile: in the skull of most terrestrial vertebrates there is a gaping hole in the temple; in the case of most reptiles, there are two. Scientists have been looking for explanations for this for 150 years. A team of researchers from the University of Tübingen and Ruhr University Bochum has now shown that the forces acting on the skull change depending on how and where food is held, bitten and chewed in the mouth - and over millions of years, these factors lead to the formation of connections and openings in the skull.

Life Sciences - 02.04.2024
How and why animals can live alongside humans
How and why animals can live alongside humans
New study suggests animals can live alongside humans-if they are risk-analysis experts New research suggests animals can thrive in human-dominated environments by being expert judges of risk.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 02.04.2024
When Did the Chicken Cross the Road? New Evidence from Central Asia
When Did the Chicken Cross the Road? New Evidence from Central Asia
New research reveals that chickens were widely raised across southern Central Asia from 400 BCE through medieval periods and likely dispersed along the ancient Silk Road In a new study published by Nature Communications , an international team of scholars present the earliest clear archaeological and biomolecular evidence for the raising of chickens for egg production, based on material from 12 archaeological sites spanning one and a half millennia.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.03.2024
Neurons spoil your appetite
Neurons spoil your appetite
Satiety, nausea or anxiety can all lead to a loss of appetite. Delaying eating can be a healthy move by the body to prevent further damage and to gain time for regenerating. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Intelligence now identified the circuit in the brain that prevents mice from eating when they feel nauseous.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.03.2024
Gut microbiota and antibiotics: Missing puzzle piece discovered
Gut microbiota and antibiotics: Missing puzzle piece discovered
HIRI scientists have identified a small RNA that influences the sensitivity of the intestinal commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron to certain antibiotics. The intricacies of how intestinal bacteria adapt to their environment have yet to be fully explored.
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