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Life Sciences - Environment - 18.04.2024
Environmental changes influence microbial diversity
Environmental changes influence microbial diversity
Environmental changes influence microbial communities, which are crucial for the health of the earth and humans. For instance, altered eating habits with heavily processed foods can lead to disrupted gut flora, or intensive agricultural practices can disturb the carbon cycle in the soil, respectively.

Environment - Economics - 16.04.2024
For more sustainable palm oil production
For more sustainable palm oil production
Research team outlines ways to make oil palm cultivation more ecologically and economically sustainable Palm oil is a widely used ingredient in many foods and cosmetics. The boom in oil palm cultivation in Indonesia in recent decades has improved the living conditions of many farmers, but has led to a loss of biodiversity and the large-scale destruction of rainforests.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.04.2024
Bumblebees don't care about pesticide cocktails
Bumblebees don’t care about pesticide cocktails
In their natural environment, wild bees are exposed to various pesticides that can have a potentially toxic effect. A study by the University of Würzburg has now shown that bumblebees are relatively resistant to these products. Bumblebees appear to be quite resistant to common pesticides. This is shown by a new study, the results of which have now been published by scientists from Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in the journal Environment International .

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2024
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
Research team at the University of Freiburg discovers previously unknown gene that indirectly promotes photosynthesis Cyanobacteria - also called blue-green algae - are known as the "plants of the ocean" because they carry out photosynthesis on a gigantic scale, produce oxygen and extract the greenhouse gas CO2 from the environment.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2024
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
Research team at the University of Freiburg discovers a previously unknown gene that indirectly promotes photosynthesis Cyanobacteria are also known as blue-green algae and are considered the "plants of the ocean" because they photosynthesize on a gigantic scale, produce oxygen and extract the greenhouse gas CO2 from the environment.

Environment - 12.04.2024
Storks fly with a little help from their friends
With long legs and large wings, the white stork is a prominent star of the pageant that is animal migration. Flying from Europe towards Africa in autumn, and then back again in spring, birds can be seen taking to the sky in conspicuous flocks that herald the changing of the seasons. Now, a study from the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior in Konstanz, Germany, has an explanation for how this collective phenomenon forms: the storks are choosing to fly together.

Environment - Innovation - 11.04.2024
Hybrid Intelligence Can Reconcile Biodiversity & Agriculture
Pioneering approach to conflicting goals Hybrid Intelligence Can Reconcile Biodiversity & Agriculture Preserving biodiversity without reducing agricultural productivity: So far, these two goals could not be reconciled because the socio-ecological system of agriculture is highly complex, and the interactions between humans and the environment are difficult to capture using conventional methods.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.04.2024
High ozone levels could be a cause of insect decline
High ozone levels could be a cause of insect decline
The oxidant pollutant removes mating barriers between fly species and increases the occurrence of sterile hybrids In a recent study, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, show that ozone levels, such as those found in many places on hot summer days today, destroy the sex pheromones of fruit fly species.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 05.04.2024
Away with industrial agriculture
Away with industrial agriculture
Global study: Diversified agriculture strengthens food security and biodiversity . Mixing livestock farming and arable farming, integrating flower strips and trees, water and soil protection and much more: a comprehensive global study led by the Universities of Copenhagen and Hohenheim and with the participation of the University of Göttingen has investigated the effects of diversified agriculture.

Chemistry - Environment - 03.04.2024
New Method for Storing and Processing Hydrogen Chloride Paves the Way for Safer, More Sustainable Hydrogen and Base Chemical Production
Hydrogen chloride can now be stored, processed, and electrolyzed safely thanks to breakthrough by research team at Freie Universität Berlin A research team at Freie Universität Berlin led by Professor Sebastian Hasenstab-Riedel has successfully developed a method for storing and electrolyzing gaseous hydrogen chloride in the form of an ionic liquid.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.04.2024
How green algae and bacteria together contribute to climate protection
How green algae and bacteria together contribute to climate protection
Microscopic algae play a significant role in binding carbon dioxide and are therefore of great ecological importance. In nature, microalgae have coexisted with bacteria for many millions of years. Bacteria can either harm algae or promote their growth. A research team at Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany has now found a bacterium that forms a team with a green alga.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.03.2024
First global study of coastal seas as carbon dioxide reservoirs possible
First global study of coastal seas as carbon dioxide reservoirs possible
Coastal seas form a complex transition zone between the two largest CO2 sinks in the global carbon cycle: land and ocean. Ocean researchers have now succeeded for the first time in investigating the role of the coastal ocean in a seamless model representation. The team led by Dr. Moritz Mathis from the Cluster of Excellence for Climate Research CLICCS at Universität Hamburg and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon was able to show: The intensity of CO2 uptake is higher in coastal seas than in the open ocean.

Environment - Economics - 22.03.2024
All Countries' Agri-Environmental Policies at a Glance
All Countries’ Agri-Environmental Policies at a Glance
University of Bonn researchers publish dataset of over 6,000 policies from all'over the world There can be no analysis without data. In this spirit, researchers from the University of Bonn and the Swiss Federal Institution of Technology (ETH) Zurich have published a database containing over 6,000 agri-environmental policies, thus enabling their peers as well as policymakers and businesses to seek answers to all manner of different questions.

Environment - Chemistry - 20.03.2024
Harnessing hydrogen at life's origin
Harnessing hydrogen at life’s origin
Researchers gain new insights into how the first cells on Earth were able to use hydrogen gas as an energy source Hydrogen gas (H2) is seen as a key to sustainable energy for the future. Yet it is an ancient form of energy. Even the very first cells on earth lived on H2, which was produced in hydrothermal vents.

Environment - 19.03.2024
Fairy circles: plant water stress causes Namibia's gaps in grass
Fairy circles: plant water stress causes Namibia’s gaps in grass
Researchers describe topsoil as "death zone" for fresh grass in the fairy circle Namibia's legendary fairy circles are mysterious, circular, bald patches in the dry grasslands on the edge of the Namib Desert. Their formation has been researched for decades and has recently been the subject of much debate.

Environment - 19.03.2024
Satellite images from US espionage programmes for ecology and nature conservation
The images taken by US spy satellites since the late 1950s have long been classified. They became publicly accessible in the late 1990s and are used, among others, in climate research and archaeology. Researchers from the Conservation Biogeography Lab of the Institute of Geography at Humboldt-Universität led by Tobias Kümmerle also take interest in the black-and-white photographs.

Environment - 18.03.2024
Reaching under the wings of birds in the agricultural landscape
Reaching under the wings of birds in the agricultural landscape
Research team shows links between agricultural landscape structure and bird populations . The intensification of agriculture has its price: it makes landscapes structurally more uniform and thus contributes to the decline in biodiversity. How should agricultural landscapes be designed in order to promote biodiversity? A new study by researchers from the University of Göttingen, the Dachverband Deutscher Avifaunisten (DDA) e. V.

Environment - 14.03.2024
Plant identification via app enables phenological monitoring
Plant identification via app enables phenological monitoring
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena and the TU Ilmenau have shown that plant observations collected using plant identification apps such as Flora Incognita can provide information about the developmental stages of plants - both on a small scale and across Europe. "The snowdrops have never bloomed as early as this year, have they?" Many people who walk through nature with their eyes open are sure to have asked themselves these or similar questions.

Environment - Economics - 06.03.2024
Forestry in a changing climate: extreme weather increases investment risk
Forestry in a changing climate: extreme weather increases investment risk
Research team investigates adaptation strategies from a forestry perspective . Climate change is altering our forests. Increased storms and drought have significant consequences for ecosystems and their sustainable use. Forests are important for wood production, carbon storage and local recreation, for example.

Environment - 27.02.2024
When the swimming hunter becomes exhausted
When the swimming hunter becomes exhausted
Fish are changing how they search for and consume prey in warmer waters, with models suggesting extinctions become more likely due to this behaviour change, according to a new study published in "Nature Climate Change" . Led by researchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, the researchers found that fish in the Baltic Sea respond to temperature increases by consuming the first prey they encounter.