Mini crime stories in 3D

Psychologist Ulrike Kruse from the University of Jena (right) with a female test
Psychologist Ulrike Kruse from the University of Jena (right) with a female test person in the laboratory. Image: Anne Günther (University of Jena)

Eyewitness statements are one of the key sources for identifying perpetrators - and one of the most error-prone. For example, the Innocence Project - an organisation that works to clear up miscarriages of justice in the US - states that incorrect eyewitness statements played a role in 64 per cent of the cases in which it was able to secure the release of people who had been wrongly convicted. Further research is needed to find out why eyewitnesses are so often wrong, and this will require extensive visual material. Psychologist Ulrike Kruse of Friedrich Schiller University Jena has now created such visual aids, through the unusual method of shooting mini crime stories. Together with her colleague, Prof. Stefan R. ...

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