Distant star cradles

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The James Webb Space Telescope Reveals Star Formation in Gas and Dust Networks of Other Galaxies

NGC 1365 is a very active barred spiral galaxy at a distance of 64 million light
NGC 1365 is a very active barred spiral galaxy at a distance of 64 million light years. Gas and dust along the bar connect the spiral arms to the galactic center. The bar is constantly feeding new gas into the galaxy’s core, driving ongoing star formation there. The image is composed in the same way as described for NGC 628. NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt (CC BY 2.0)

Even the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope are helping to clarify questions about how stars form in relatively nearby galaxies. Data from the powerful infrared telescope are revealing to scientists previously hidden regions where new stars are born. These images provide the first clues about how networks of gas and dust become the site of active star formation.

Astronomers from around the world, including scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, aim to unravel some of the last mysteries of star formation in galaxies. ...

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