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Results 21 - 40 of 738.


Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.12.2023
How forests smell - a risk for the climate?
Plants emit odours for a variety of reasons, such as to communicate with each other, to deter herbivores or to respond to changing environmental conditions. An interdisciplinary team of researchers from Leipzig University, the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) carried out a study to investigate how biodiversity influences the emission of these substances.

Chemistry - 13.12.2023
Hydrogen through Sunlight
Hydrogen through Sunlight
For hydrogen to be sustainably produced using sunlight, it's not just an efficient catalyst system that's needed - it must also be economical, readily available, and resource-efficient. A team led by chemist Kalina Peneva from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Macromolecular Chemistry at the University of Jena has made a step in this direction.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2023
Biosynthesis of paclitaxel unravelled
Biosynthesis of paclitaxel unravelled
Researchers have identified the steps for the biosynthesis of the chemotherapeutic agent for cancer therapy Part of modern cancer therapy is the use of toxic chemicals, called chemotherapeutics, that kill the tumor. Unfortunately, these chemicals are often very complex, difficult to obtain and thus expensive.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2023
Examining diabetes with a skin scanner and AI
Examining diabetes with a skin scanner and AI
Optoacoustic imaging method RSOM shows severity of the disease Changes in small blood vessels are a common consequence of diabetes development. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Munich have now developed a method that can be used to measure these microvascular changes in the skin - and thus assess the severity of the disease.

Psychology - 11.12.2023
Is age linked to the picture of the perfect partner?
Is age linked to the picture of the perfect partner?
Research team led by Göttingen University studies a large, international sample of single women How do women picture the partner of their dreams? And how does this vary between women based on their age? A team of researchers led by the University of Göttingen investigated the complex relationships between age and preferences for a partner in a large, international sample of single women.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2023
Degradation of pathogenic proteins
Degradation of pathogenic proteins
Most diseases are caused by proteins that have spun out of control. Unfortunately, so far, conventional drugs have been able to stop only a fraction of these troublemakers. A new class of drugs known as Protacs holds great promise in pharmaceutical research. They mark proteins for targeted degradation by the cell's own protein disposal system.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 11.12.2023
Did body size in the Neolithic Age depend on cultural influences?
Did body size in the Neolithic Age depend on cultural influences?
International research team studied more than 1,500 individuals who lived around 6,000 to 8,000 years ago The difference in body size between male and female individuals in Northern Europe during the early Neolithic period (8,000 to 6,000 years ago) could have been influenced by cultural factors. The results of an international research team led by the University of Pennsylvania (USA) suggest that the differences in body size during this period cannot be explained by genetic and dietary factors alone.

Life Sciences - Environment - 08.12.2023
Dreissenid mussels: the resilience and success of an invasive species
Dreissenid mussels: the resilience and success of an invasive species
Scientists shed light on unique fibre structure, evolutionary history and combating invasive species Zebra and quagga mussels, which belong to the Dreissenid family, are freshwater invasive species widespread throughout western Europe and North America. They present a significant danger to native ecosystems by competing for resources.

Materials Science - Environment - 08.12.2023
Battery recycling: China is in first place
Battery recycling: China is in first place
China covers its demand for lithium, cobalt and nickel for batteries by recycling, ahead of Europe and the USA. With the increasing production of batteries for electric vehicles, the demand for the necessary raw materials is also rising. In view of the supply risks, environmental problems and precarious working conditions associated with the extraction and transportation of these raw materials, the recycling of battery materials has become an important topic in science, politics and industry.

Health - 08.12.2023
How Immune Cells Recognize their Enemies
How Immune Cells Recognize their Enemies
In order for immune cells to do their job, they need to know against whom they should direct their attack. Research teams at the University of Würzburg have identified new details in this process. As complicated as their name is, they are important for the human organism in the fight against pathogens and cancer: V'9V'2 T cells are part of the immune system and, as a subgroup of white blood cells, fight tumor cells and cells infected with pathogens.

Chemistry - Innovation - 08.12.2023
Catalysis Laboratory CaRLa: Successful Cooperation Extended
Heidelberg University and BASF continue research cooperation - One main area of research is the chemical recycling plastic waste BASF and Heidelberg University will do research together for another five years in the Catalysis Research Laboratory (CaRLa) founded in 2006. The two partners have signed an agreement to this effect, extending their successful research cooperation until 2028.

Astronomy / Space - Computer Science - 08.12.2023
Giant doubts about giant exomoons
Giant doubts about giant exomoons
Discovery of giant exomoons around the planets Kepler-1625b and Kepler-1708b called into question Just as it can be assumed that the stars in our Milky Way are orbited by planets, moons around these exoplanets should not be uncommon. This makes it all the more difficult to detect them. So far, only two of the more than 5300 known exoplanets have been found to have moons.

Health - 07.12.2023
How biorhythms and fatty liver are connected
Participants who would like to find out more about their biorhythm are being sought for a comprehensive study. Our internal clock guides us through day and night and has far-reaching effects on our metabolism. If it gets out of balance, this can have health consequences. Mustafa Özcürümez from the Medical Clinic of the University Hospital Knappschaftskrankenhaus Bochum and the Eye Clinic there, under the direction of Burkhard Dick, are conducting a study to find out whether and how biorhythm disorders promote the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Environment - 06.12.2023
Deciphering nature's climate shield: Plant diversity stabilises soil temperature
Deciphering nature’s climate shield: Plant diversity stabilises soil temperature
A new study has revealed a natural solution to mitigate the effects of climate change, such as extreme weather events. Researchers from Leipzig University, the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research Halle-Jena-Leipzig (iDiv) and other research institutions have discovered that high plant diversity acts as a buffer against fluctuations in soil temperature.

Environment - 06.12.2023
Urbanization increases seasonal differences in plant-pollinator networks
Urbanization increases seasonal differences in plant-pollinator networks
Research team led by Göttingen University investigates importance of season and environment in tropical megacity Increasing urbanization worldwide is a growing threat to biodiversity. At the same time, flowering plants are often more diverse in cities than in the countryside. This is due to flowering plants and agricultural crops, which are increasingly being grown in cities.

Life Sciences - 06.12.2023
Comparable memory strategies in birds and humans
Comparable memory strategies in birds and humans
Jackdaws improve their memory performance by classifying continuous stimuli into categories. The so-called attractor dynamics provide new insights into the functioning of the brain. Working memory is a crucial element of higher cognition in both primates - which include humans - and corvids. In their studies with the help of two jackdaws, researchers at Ruhr University Bochum have now discovered remarkable parallels in the memory optimization of primates and corvids.

Environment - 06.12.2023
Urbanization increases seasonal differences in plant-pollinator networks
Urbanization increases seasonal differences in plant-pollinator networks
Press release: Urbanization amplifies seasonal differences in plant-pollinator networks Research team investigates importance of season and environment in tropical megacity . Increasing urbanization worldwide is a growing threat to biodiversity. At the same time, flowering plants are often more diverse in cities than in the countryside.

Life Sciences - 06.12.2023
Friendly hyenas are more likely to form mobs
Friendly hyenas are more likely to form mobs
Strong social relationships make hyenas more likely to team up against lions, even when there's no obvious benefit After more than 35 years of surveillance, researchers from Michigan State University and the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior are exposing some of the secret workings of mobs. The team revealed that relationships and social interactions between hyenas can influence when two or more animals decide to work together to attack lions.

History / Archeology - Environment - 06.12.2023
Oldest Fortresses in the World Discovered
Oldest Fortresses in the World Discovered
Archaeologists from Freie Universität Berlin together with an international team confirm ancient prehistoric fortifications in Siberia. Research results published in the scientific journal "Antiquity." In a groundbreaking archaeological discovery, an international team led by archaeologists from Freie Universität Berlin has uncovered fortified prehistoric settlements in a remote region of Siberia.

Computer Science - Microtechnics - 04.12.2023
Artificial intelligence makes gripping more intuitive
Current hand prostheses already work with the help of an app or sensors attached to the forearm. New research at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) shows this: A better understanding of muscle activity patterns enables more intuitive and natural control of the prostheses. This requires a network of 128 sensors and the use of artificial intelligence .