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Life Sciences - Research Management - 27.05.2022
New research alliance studies the biology of immune cells
New research alliance studies the biology of immune cells
A new boost for top-level research: the German Research Foundation (DFG) is setting up a new Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio (CRC/TRR) at the University of Münster. The research alliance, entitled "Neutrophils: Origin, Fate & Function" will be devoted to conducting research into special cells in the immune system.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.05.2022
A potential fountain of youth for the immune system
05/25/2022 In old age, the performance of the immune system decreases, and older people are more susceptible to infections. Research teams from Würzburg and Freiburg have now discovered an approach that could be used to slow down this process. The corona pandemic has made it clear: Older people are more susceptible to infections, suffer from more severe infectious diseases than young people, and they take significantly longer to recover.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.05.2022
Secrets of thymus formation revealed
Secrets of thymus formation revealed
Max Planck researchers identify epithelial stem cells that control the growth of the thymus at different stages of life Many immune cells crucial for our immune system develop in a small organ next to our heart: the thymus. With age, however, the thymus shrinks, and the number of effective immune cells declines.

Life Sciences - 23.05.2022
Microparticles with feeling
Microparticles with feeling
Researchers develop a new method to simultaneously measure flow and oxygen The surface of a coral is rugged. Its hard skeleton is populated by polyps that stretch their tentacles into the surrounding water to filter out food. But how exactly does the water flow over the coral surface, what eddies and flows develop, and what does this mean for the oxygen supply around the coral and its associated algae?

Health - Life Sciences - 19.05.2022
New method revolutionizes cancer diagnosis
"Deep Visual Proteomics" technology provides cell-specific, protein-based information and helps to analyze cancer diseases How does cancer arise? How does cellular composition influence tumor malignancy? These questions are profound and challenging to answer, but are crucial to understand the disease and find the right cure.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 19.05.2022
The fading of negative experiences
Active suppression weakens unwanted memories A natural disaster, a dented car, an injured person - memories of traumatic experiences can be controlled by deliberately suppressing the images that arise. Until now, however, it was unclear what happens to the memory in the process and how the process is reflected in the brain.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.05.2022
On the trail of urinary tract infections
On the trail of urinary tract infections
05/18/2022 The German government is providing about 2.4 million Euros for a new research group in infectious diseases at JMU Würzburg. Dr. Carmen Aguilar will use this grant to search for new therapeutic approaches against one of the most common and recurrent bacterial infections. About every second woman gets a urinary tract infection once in her life, the cause for which is most often the uropathogenic bacterium Escherichia coli (UPEC).

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.05.2022
How faulty mRNA is detected and destroyed
Two similar proteins can stand in for each other in the quality control mechanism of defective mRNA. This has redefined the distribution of protein tasks / publication in 'The EMBO Journal'. Scientists led by Professor Dr Niels Gehring at the Institute for Genetics at the University of Cologne have investigated two similar proteins, UPF3A and UPF3B, which are involved in the quality control mechanism 'nonsense-mediated mRNA decay' (NMD).

Life Sciences - Environment - 17.05.2022
Dust catchers: Biological crusts influence the climate
Dust catchers: Biological crusts influence the climate
A surface layer of bacteria, fungi and lichen amongst others reduces the amount of dust stirred up into the atmosphere When bacteria, fungi, mosses, lichens and algae combine on dry land, they form so-called biological soil crusts. These cover about twelve percent of the total global land surface, and up to one third of the surface in dry areas.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.05.2022
Overgrazing alters the ecosystem irreversibly
Overgrazing alters the ecosystem irreversibly
Research team including Göttingen University identifies limit based on microbiology functions The Tibetan plateau is of particular importance for a number of reasons: as a grazing ecosystem, as a carbon store, to initiate the monsoon climate, and to ensure a supply of drinking water. With low to moderate grazing, dead and living roots of the wild sedge plants that are widespread there protect the soil from degradation, meaning the gradual loss of ecosystem functions due to erosion.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.05.2022
Newly discovered enzyme breaks down PET plastic in record time
Research finding from Leipzig could help make biological recycling more commercially viable Plastic bottles, punnets, wrap - such lightweight packaging made of PET plastic becomes a problem if it is not recycled. Scientists at Leipzig University have now discovered a highly efficient enzyme that degrades PET in record time.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.05.2022
Chimpanzees combine calls to form numerous vocal sequences
Chimpanzees combine calls to form numerous vocal sequences
Evidence of structured vocal sequences in wild chimpanzee communication provides insights into human language evolution Compared to the complex use of human language, the way animals communicate with each other appears quite simple. How our language evolved from such a simple system, remains unclear.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.05.2022
'Growing end' of inflammation discovered
’Growing end’ of inflammation discovered
Researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Cologne observe how the danger sensor NLRP3 lengthens itself like a thread Redness, swelling, pain - these are signs of inflammation. It serves to protect the body from pathogens or foreign substances. Researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Cologne were able to show that inflammatory reactions of an important sensor protein proceed in a specific spatial direction.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.05.2022
A repair program for the heart
Following a heart attack, the human body is incapable of repairing lost tissue due to the heart's inability to generate new muscle. However, treatment with heart progenitor cells could result in the formation of functional heart cells at injured sites. This new therapeutic approach is introduced by an international team.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.05.2022
Rare discovery: How a gene mutation causes higher intelligence
Rare discovery: How a gene mutation causes higher intelligence
When genes mutate, this can lead to severe diseases of the human nervous system. Researchers at Leipzig University and the University of Würzburg have now used fruit flies to demonstrate how, apart from the negative effect, the mutation of a neuronal gene can have a positive effect - namely higher IQ in humans.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.05.2022
Animal research: influence of experimenters on results less strong than expected
Animal research: influence of experimenters on results less strong than expected
For more than ten years now, scientists have been discussing the so-called reproducibility crisis: often, scientific findings cannot be reproduced at a later time and/or in other laboratories, although the studies are carried out under highly standardised conditions. Thereby, standardisation includes for example the use of genetically identical animals, keeping the animals in identically equipped cages, and carrying out the experiments in always the same way.

Life Sciences - Laboratory - 05.05.2022
Cell division in moss and animals more similar than previously thought
Cell division in moss and animals more similar than previously thought
German-Japanese research team from Universities of Freiburg and Nagoya identifies what determines the site of cell division in plants For a new plant to grow from a seed, cells need to divide numerous times. Daughter cells can each take on different tasks and sometimes vary in size. How plants determine the plane of cell division in this process, known as mitosis, is being researched by Ralf Reski and Dr. Elena Kozgunova from the University of Freiburg in a joint effort with Prof. Dr. Gohta Goshima from Nagoya University.

Life Sciences - 05.05.2022
Research team decodes human genome
Research team decodes human genome
"A big puzzle": How an international consortium has now completely decoded the human genome The human genome is like a puzzle - but a difficult one to solve: This puzzle has more than three billion pieces. And as if that were not challenging enough, the puzzle is made even more confusing by similar pieces as well as patterns that repeat themselves.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.05.2022
The fungal effector Rip 1 suppresses maize host defense responses
The fungal effector Rip 1 suppresses maize host defense responses
Coevolution between pathogens and host plant immune systems shapes a multifaceted network of interactions that remain phenotypically unrecognised and functionally elusive unless single players are depleted from the system. The maize-colonising fungus Ustilago maydis secretes a complex effector blend in order to suppress defence and redirect host metabolism in its favour.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 03.05.2022
Spread of black rats was linked to human historical events
Spread of black rats was linked to human historical events
New research reveals how the black rat colonised Europe in the Roman and Medieval periods New ancient DNA analysis has shed light on how the black rat, blamed for spreading Black Death, dispersed across Europe - revealing that the rodent colonised the continent on two occasions in the Roman and Medieval periods.
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