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Environment - Life Sciences - 12.10.2021
Insects in the Light of Land Use and Climate
Insects in the Light of Land Use and Climate
Urbanisation appears to be another key factor for insect decline. This is shown by a study in which the impact of climate and land use on insects was disentangled for the first time. Worldwide, the quantity and diversity of insects are declining: scientists have reported more and more evidence for this in recent years.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.09.2021
Diversity matters
Diversity matters
09/23/2021 The higher the biological diversity in an ecosystem, the better the important processes there function. A heterogeneous environment promotes this effect, while intensive land use weakens it, as a new study shows. Microorganisms, plants, and animals accomplish great feats every day. For example, by decomposing material, producing plant biomass, or pollinating flowers, they keep nature 'up and running,' thereby securing the livelihood of humans.

Environment - 23.09.2021
How robust are ecosystems? Three key indicators hold the clues
How robust are ecosystems? Three key indicators hold the clues
Göttingen University research team involved in global study on conditions and capacity to adapt Ecosystems provide a wide range of services to people. These services depend on basic ecosystem functions, which are shaped by natural conditions like climate, the mix of species and by human intervention.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.09.2021
Insect species survives without sexual reproduction
Insect species survives without sexual reproduction
International researchers including the University of Göttingen demonstrate for the first time that animals can survive very long periods of time without sex It was thought that the survival of animal species over a geologically long period of time without sexual reproduction would be very unlikely, if not impossible.

Environment - 16.09.2021
Local wood with fire protection properties
Local wood with fire protection properties
University of Göttingen and Archroma develop new method for treating wood Forest scientists at the University of Göttingen, together with the Swiss company Archroma, a global specialty chemicals company, have developed a new method for turning affordable and ecologically friendly wood from European forests into high-quality, fire-resistant construction timber.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 08.09.2021
Hand pollination of crops is of major importance
Hand pollination of crops is of major importance
Research team at the Universities of Göttingen and Hohenheim analyses use in worldwide commercial cultivation Pollinators - such as bees, butterflies and birds - are essential for agricultural production. However, natural pollination can also fail or be insufficient, which can lead to lower yields and poorer quality.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.09.2021
Photosynthesis even at high temperatures: helper protein ensures the formation of chlorophyll
New study reveals the protective function of the chaperone cpSRP43 against heat shock Plants make use of complex metabolic processes to produce chlorophyll - the pigment that gives them their green colour and enables photosynthesis. The fact that so-called chlorophyll biosynthesis works smoothly even in the presence of heat is due to a certain helper protein: the chaperone cpSRP43.

Environment - 01.09.2021
Deadwood in the global carbon cycle
Deadwood in the global carbon cycle
The importance of insects in the decomposition of wood The speed at which deadwood decomposes in forests depends on the climate as well as on fungi and insects. An international research team has now determined the annual contribution made by deadwood to the global carbon cycle and quantified the importance of insects in the decomposition of wood for the first time.

Paleontology - Environment - 31.08.2021
Crocodile tours - fossil Caimans in North America
Crocodile tours - fossil Caimans in North America
A new study of two approximately 52-million-year-old fossil finds from the Green River Formation in Wyoming, USA, has fitted them into the evolutionary history of crocodiles. Biogeologists Jules Wal-ter, Dr. Márton Rabi of the University of Tübingen, working with some other colleagues, determined the extinct species Tsoabichi greenriverensis to be an early caiman crocodile.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 24.08.2021
Bird communities threatened by urbanization
Bird communities threatened by urbanization
Research team led by Göttingen University investigates farmland birds in an Indian megacity Urbanization is one of the most drastic forms of land-use change, and its negative consequences on biodiversity have been studied extensively in temperate countries such as Germany. However, less research has been conducted in tropical regions from the Global South, where most of the ongoing and future urbanization hotspots are located, and little is known about its effects on agricultural biodiversity and associated ecosystems.

Environment - 06.08.2021
Major Atlantic Ocean Current System May Be Approaching Critical Threshold
New Study by Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Freie Universität Berlin, and Exeter University No 152/2021 from Aug 06, 2021 A major Atlantic Ocean current, which includes the Gulf Stream, may have lost stability over the course of the last century. The research appeared in a new study published , authored by Niklas Boers (Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, PIK, Freie Universität Berlin, and Exeter University).

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 04.08.2021
Promoting biodiversity-friendly landscapes - beyond organic farming
Promoting biodiversity-friendly landscapes - beyond organic farming
Research team led by the University of Göttingen calls for paradigm shift Is organic farming the only alternative to conventional agriculture to promote biodiversity in agricultural landscapes? An international research team led by the University of Göttingen questions this.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 04.08.2021
51,000-year-old Engraved Giant Deer Bone Discovered in the Harz Mountains
Artifacts found in the Einhornhöhle cave in northern Germany are the subject of a research project involving experts from Freie Universität Berlin and shine a light on the cognitive abilities of our Neanderthal ancestors No 150/2021 from Aug 04, 2021 A discovery made by a research team in a cave in Lower Saxony, northern Germany, suggests that Neanderthals were not merely a primitive subspecies of archaic humans - a commonplace belief ever since their first fossil remains were found in the nineteenth century.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.07.2021
Solar-powered microbes to feed the world?
International research team shows that protein from microbes uses a fraction of the resources of conventional farming Microbes have played a key role in our food and drinks - from cheese to beer - for millennia but their impact on our nutrition may soon become even more important. The world is facing growing food challenges as the human population continues to increase alongside its demand for resource intensive animal products.

Environment - Chemistry - 22.07.2021
Eco-friendly plastic from cellulose and water
Eco-friendly plastic from cellulose and water
Göttingen researchers create new kind of environmentally friendly bioplastic with hydroplastic polymers Plastics offer many benefits to society and are widely used in our daily life: they are lightweight, cheap and adaptable. However, the production, processing and disposal of plastics are simply not sustainable, and pose a major global threat to the environment and human health.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.07.2021
How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
Tracking future forest fires with AI As temperatures rise, the risk of devastating forest fires is increasing. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are using artificial intelligence to estimate the long-term impact that an increased number of forest fires will have on forest ecosystems.

Environment - 08.07.2021
CO2 storage through dead plant material
CO2 storage through dead plant material
Allowing plant residues to rot on the field is good for the climate Plants rotting in the soil are valuable for more than just compost. In fact, plant residues play a crucial role in keeping carbon in the soil, which is important for reducing the planet's CO2 emissions. This is the conclusion of a new study by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and other institutions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.07.2021
Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Climatic changes are increasingly giving rise to major fires on peatlands in the northern hemisphere, which release massive quantities of carbon dioxide. However, the biomass of the peatland is not entirely consumed by fire, some turns to charcoal in the absence of air. Now, Dr. Tianran Sun and Professor Lars Angenent from Environmental Biotechnology at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with colleagues at Cornell University in the USA have discovered that the carbonized biomass reduces production of the methane gases naturally occurring in the peat soil.

Environment - 29.06.2021
Good food in a nice setting: wild bees need diverse agricultural landscapes
Good food in a nice setting: wild bees need diverse agricultural landscapes
Research team investigates influence of different mass-flowering crops on pollinators Mass-flowering crops such as oilseed rape or faba bean (also known as broad bean) provide valuable sources of food for bees, which, in turn, contribute to the pollination of both the crops and nearby wild plants when they visit.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.06.2021
Plasticity in plants supports the evolution of ecologically specialized species
Role of plasticity as a support for future adaptation depends on specific challenges species have to face as they evolve their specialized ecology / Cologne-based research team gather data for first comparative atlas of the gene expression response to stress in ecologically different plant species An international group of researchers have found out that the ability of certain plants to adapt to future environmental challenges by altering their
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