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Life Sciences - Environment - 18.02.2021
Wolves prefer to feed on the wild side
Wolves prefer to feed on the wild side
Research team studies feeding behaviour of wild predators in Mongolia When there is a choice, wolves in Mongolia prefer to feed on wild animals rather than grazing livestock. This is the discovery by a research team from the University of Göttingen and the Senckenberg Museum Görlitz. Previous studies had shown that the diet of wolves in inland Central Asia consists mainly of grazing livestock, which could lead to increasing conflict between nomadic livestock herders and wild predatory animals like wolves.

Materials Science - Environment - 18.02.2021
Three Forward-Looking Research Fields Dominate Battery Research
Smartphones and laptops constantly in use, smart building technology, the expansion of renewable energies, networked charging stations for electric cars or the debate surrounding air taxis: sustainable, safe and efficient batteries are the basis of our lives as well as paving the way for the future.

Environment - 04.02.2021
Forests of the world in 3D
Forests of the world in 3D
Research team led by the University of Göttingen analyses complexity of forest structure Primeval forests are of great importance for biodiversity and global carbon and water cycling. The three-dimensional structure of forests plays an important role here because it influences processes of gas and energy exchange with the atmosphere, whilst also providing habitats for numerous species.

Environment - 02.02.2021
Flower diversity may mitigate insecticide effects on wild bees
Flower diversity may mitigate insecticide effects on wild bees
Research team led by the University of Göttingen emphasizes the benefits of diversifying flower resources A higher diversity of flowering plants increases the breeding success of wild bees and may help compensate for the negative effects of insecticides. This is what researchers from the Universities of Göttingen and Hohenheim, as well as the Julius Kühn Institute, have found in a large-scale experimental study.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.02.2021
"Living Fossil" in the Namib Has Different Subspecies
A family of Welwitschia already inhabited Earth 112 million years ago. A research team in the Department of Biology at Universität Hamburg has now used short DNA sequences to discover that the only still-living species of Weltwitschia mirabilis has different subspecies. The findings were published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Environment - Materials Science - 29.01.2021
Climate-Relevant Exchange Processes between Atmosphere and Ocean
Climate-Relevant Exchange Processes between Atmosphere and Ocean
Environmental physicist Bernd Jähne from Heidelberg University is pursuing a new approach to exploring the processes that ensue with the exchange of climatically relevant gases and volatiles between the atmosphere and the ocean. To this end, the scientist will use two imaging measurement procedures for experiments in the Heidelberg Aelotron, a wind-wave tank.

Environment - 29.01.2021
How is human behaviour impacting wildlife movement?
How is human behaviour impacting wildlife movement?
Research team with Göttingen University calls for -anthropogenic resistance- to be considered in conservation and sustainability planning For species to survive in the wild, maintaining connectivity between populations is critical. Without -wildlife corridors-, groups of animals are isolated, unable to breed and may die out.

Chemistry - Environment - 29.01.2021
Synthesizing valuable chemicals from contaminated soil
Researchers of Mainz University use electrolysis to produce dichloro and dibromo compounds in a safer and more environmentally friendly manner / Results published in Science 29 January 2021 Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and ETH Zurich have developed a process to produce commodity chemicals in a much less hazardous way than was previously possible.

Environment - 27.01.2021
How do human behaviors impact wildlife movements?
How do human behaviors impact wildlife movements?
Researchers call for incorporation of human behaviors in conservation planning to ensure sustainable landscapes for wildlife and people. In a Perspective piece published today in One Earth journal, an international team including Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin researchers Arash Ghoddousi and Tobias Kuemmerle introduce the term 'anthropogenic resistance' to better recognize and estimate the impacts of human behaviors on wildlife movements.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 20.01.2021
Oldest Carbonates in the Solar System
Oldest Carbonates in the Solar System
A meteorite that fell in northern Germany in 2019 contains carbonates that are among the oldest in the solar system; it also evidences the earliest presence of liquid water on a minute planet. The high-resolution Heidelberg Ion Probe - a research instrument at the Institute of Earth Sciences at Heidelberg University - provided the measurements.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.01.2021
Digging Beneath the Surface
Researchers call for greater consideration of soil biodiversity and its ecological functions in developing international conservation strategies No 008/2021 from Jan 15, 2021 The soil is home to a quarter of all known species. In fact, life above ground wouldn't be possible without the soil and its countless inhabitants.

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