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Results 81 - 100 of 298.


Life Sciences - 14.07.2021
Genome studies: more is not always better
Genome studies: more is not always better
07/14/2021 The characteristics of plants of the same species can have different genetic causes depending on their origin. This is shown by a recent study at the University of Würzburg. What the fruit fly is to zoologists, the thale cress is to botanists. The widespread herb with the botanical name Arabidopsis thaliana serves them as a model organism from which knowledge can be gained for other plants.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.07.2021
How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
Tracking future forest fires with AI As temperatures rise, the risk of devastating forest fires is increasing. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are using artificial intelligence to estimate the long-term impact that an increased number of forest fires will have on forest ecosystems.

Chemistry - 12.07.2021
Mechanical stimuli influence organ growth
Mechanical stimuli influence organ growth
Organoids help understand the complex interactions of cells and tissue In addition to chemical factors, mechanical influences play an important role in the natural growth of human organs such as kidneys, lungs and mammary glands - but also in the development of tumors. Now a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has investigated the process in detail using organoids, three-dimensional model systems of such organs which are produced in the laboratory.

Life Sciences - 12.07.2021
Starvation and other Stresses: Internal Sensor in Cells Coordinates Cellular Stress Response
Scientists in Cologne have discovered an important role for the protein complex mTORC1 that centrally regulates cell communication. The findings may lead to the development of new treatment methods in the future.

Life Sciences - 09.07.2021
Remote Control for Plants
Remote Control for Plants
Plant researchers have a potent new tool at disposal: Advances, a research team from Würzburg shows how to close the stomata of leaves using light pulses. Plants have microscopically small pores on the surface of their leaves, the stomata. With their help, they regulate the influx of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis.

Environment - 08.07.2021
CO2 storage through dead plant material
CO2 storage through dead plant material
Allowing plant residues to rot on the field is good for the climate Plants rotting in the soil are valuable for more than just compost. In fact, plant residues play a crucial role in keeping carbon in the soil, which is important for reducing the planet's CO2 emissions. This is the conclusion of a new study by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and other institutions.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.07.2021
Stiffness of skin tissue determines the renewal capacity of stem cells
Stiffness of skin tissue determines the renewal capacity of stem cells
Old and young skin stem cells are both capable of renewing the skin and its hair follicles. A slower renewal turnover of aged skin and its hair follicles may be caused by the decreased elasticity of skin tissues surrounding the stem cells / New insights into the causes of aging published in 'Nature Cell Biology' An international team of researchers from the Universities of Cologne and Helsinki have discovered that the ability of stem cells to proliferate and renew organs is regulated by the stiffness of the surrounding tissue.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.07.2021
Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Climatic changes are increasingly giving rise to major fires on peatlands in the northern hemisphere, which release massive quantities of carbon dioxide. However, the biomass of the peatland is not entirely consumed by fire, some turns to charcoal in the absence of air. Now, Dr. Tianran Sun and Professor Lars Angenent from Environmental Biotechnology at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with colleagues at Cornell University in the USA have discovered that the carbonized biomass reduces production of the methane gases naturally occurring in the peat soil.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.07.2021
MHH fills important gap in lung research
MHH fills important gap in lung research
For the first time, a team of scientists clearly demonstrates the existence of lipofibroblasts in human luectron microscope In medical research, animal models are used to clarify the development of diseases and to develop suitable therapies. In order to be able to transfer the results to humans, however, it must be ensured that the cell types and molecular signalling pathways studied in detail actually occur in our bodies.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 07.07.2021
Obstacles on the racetrack of life
Obstacles on the racetrack of life
mRNA plays a key role in the conversion of genetic information from DNA to proteins. Their production is a delicate process. A research team at the University of Würzburg has now identified a crucial factor. The corona pandemic has ensured that the term "mRNA" is now also known to a large public beyond laboratories and lecture halls.

Physics - Mathematics - 07.07.2021
Zeitabhängige Berechnung eines Bose-Einstein-Kondensats
The term Bose-Einstein condensate describes a state of matter in which atoms or elementary particles combine into a single quantum mechanical object during extreme cooling. Science does not yet fully understand exactly how these macroscopic states - beyond the confines of traditional physics - develop from a thermal atomic cloud in just a few milliseconds and when statistical equilibrium is reached, according to Georg Wolschin.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2021
Anti-tumor agent from the intestine
Anti-tumor agent from the intestine
Certain metabolites of bacteria from the intestine make immune cells more aggressive as a new study conducted by scientists from Würzburg and Marburg reveals. The findings could help improve cancer therapies. It is believed to be involved in the development of chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases, to trigger diabetes, to be responsible for obesity, even neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's could have their causes here - not to mention depressions and autistic disorders.

Life Sciences - 06.07.2021
Acid Sensor Discovered in Plants
Acid Sensor Discovered in Plants
If plants are flooded, they lack oxygen and their cells over-acidify. A sensor protein detects this and triggers a stress response. Researchers have now presented details about this topic in the journal Current Biology. Climate change is causing increased flooding and prolonged waterlogging in northern Europe, but also in many other parts of the world.

Earth Sciences - 05.07.2021
The inner beauty of hailstones
The inner beauty of hailstones
The Tübingen region has recently seen hailstorms that brought back memories of the devastating storm of 2013. At that time, billions of dollars in damage were caused, and the damage from the most recent storms is still being assessed. Despite all the trouble hailstones cause, they also possess a previously unknown inner beauty.

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 05.07.2021
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Discovery from Unicorn Cave in Lower Saxony sheds new light on ancestors' cognitive abilities Since the discovery of the first fossil remains in the 19 th century, the image of the Neanderthal has been one of a primitive hominin. People have known for a long time that Neanderthals were able to effectively fashion tools and weapons.

Social Sciences - Health - 30.06.2021
Modernization makes older adults feel rushed, too
New international study on time perception among older adults Rapid societal changes can leave us feeling more rushed and pressured for time - and older adults are no exception, new research finds, led by Weill Cornell Medicine with participation of researchers of Humboldt University.

Physics - 30.06.2021
Multitalented filaments in living cells
Multitalented filaments in living cells
Göttingen researchers investigate special properties of protein structures   The cells that make up our bodies are constantly exposed to a wide variety of mechanical stresses. For example, the heart and lungs have to withstand lifelong expansion and contraction, our skin has to be as resistant to tearing as possible whilst retaining its elasticity, and immune cells are very squashy so that they can move through the body.

History / Archeology - 29.06.2021
Bronze Age: how the market began
Bronze Age: how the market began
researchers investigate the spread of weighing systems across Western Eurasia 4,000 years ago Knowing the weight of a commodity provides an objective way to value goods in the marketplace. But did a self-regulating market even exist in the Bronze Age? And what can weight systems tell us about this? A team of researchers from the University of Göttingen researched this by investigating the dissemination of weight systems throughout Western Eurasia.

Environment - 29.06.2021
Good food in a nice setting: wild bees need diverse agricultural landscapes
Good food in a nice setting: wild bees need diverse agricultural landscapes
Research team investigates influence of different mass-flowering crops on pollinators Mass-flowering crops such as oilseed rape or faba bean (also known as broad bean) provide valuable sources of food for bees, which, in turn, contribute to the pollination of both the crops and nearby wild plants when they visit.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.06.2021
Protein balance in the reproductive system can prevent disease
Protein balance in the reproductive system can prevent disease
Scientists from the University of Cologne found that the balance status of proteins (protein homeostasis) of germline cells influences protein aggregation in other tissues by long-distance signaling Publication in 'Science Advances' A recent study shows that a healthy reproductive system can prevent disease-related protein accumulation in distant tissues, such as neurons, and alteration of mitochondria - the power plants of cells.