news 2021


Category

Years
2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017 | 2018 | 2019 | 2020 | 2021 |



Results 121 - 140 of 326.
« Previous 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... 17 Next »


Life Sciences - 06.07.2021
Acid Sensor Discovered in Plants
Acid Sensor Discovered in Plants
If plants are flooded, they lack oxygen and their cells over-acidify. A sensor protein detects this and triggers a stress response. Researchers have now presented details about this topic in the journal Current Biology. Climate change is causing increased flooding and prolonged waterlogging in northern Europe, but also in many other parts of the world.

Earth Sciences - 05.07.2021
The inner beauty of hailstones
The inner beauty of hailstones
The Tübingen region has recently seen hailstorms that brought back memories of the devastating storm of 2013. At that time, billions of dollars in damage were caused, and the damage from the most recent storms is still being assessed. Despite all the trouble hailstones cause, they also possess a previously unknown inner beauty.

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 05.07.2021
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Discovery from Unicorn Cave in Lower Saxony sheds new light on ancestors' cognitive abilities Since the discovery of the first fossil remains in the 19 th century, the image of the Neanderthal has been one of a primitive hominin. People have known for a long time that Neanderthals were able to effectively fashion tools and weapons.

Social Sciences - Health - 30.06.2021
Modernization makes older adults feel rushed, too
New international study on time perception among older adults Rapid societal changes can leave us feeling more rushed and pressured for time - and older adults are no exception, new research finds, led by Weill Cornell Medicine with participation of researchers of Humboldt University.

Physics - 30.06.2021
Multitalented filaments in living cells
Multitalented filaments in living cells
Göttingen researchers investigate special properties of protein structures   The cells that make up our bodies are constantly exposed to a wide variety of mechanical stresses. For example, the heart and lungs have to withstand lifelong expansion and contraction, our skin has to be as resistant to tearing as possible whilst retaining its elasticity, and immune cells are very squashy so that they can move through the body.

History / Archeology - 29.06.2021
Bronze Age: how the market began
Bronze Age: how the market began
researchers investigate the spread of weighing systems across Western Eurasia 4,000 years ago Knowing the weight of a commodity provides an objective way to value goods in the marketplace. But did a self-regulating market even exist in the Bronze Age? And what can weight systems tell us about this? A team of researchers from the University of Göttingen researched this by investigating the dissemination of weight systems throughout Western Eurasia.

Environment - 29.06.2021
Good food in a nice setting: wild bees need diverse agricultural landscapes
Good food in a nice setting: wild bees need diverse agricultural landscapes
Research team investigates influence of different mass-flowering crops on pollinators Mass-flowering crops such as oilseed rape or faba bean (also known as broad bean) provide valuable sources of food for bees, which, in turn, contribute to the pollination of both the crops and nearby wild plants when they visit.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.06.2021
Protein balance in the reproductive system can prevent disease
Protein balance in the reproductive system can prevent disease
Scientists from the University of Cologne found that the balance status of proteins (protein homeostasis) of germline cells influences protein aggregation in other tissues by long-distance signaling Publication in 'Science Advances' A recent study shows that a healthy reproductive system can prevent disease-related protein accumulation in distant tissues, such as neurons, and alteration of mitochondria - the power plants of cells.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.06.2021
Plasticity in plants supports the evolution of ecologically specialized species
Role of plasticity as a support for future adaptation depends on specific challenges species have to face as they evolve their specialized ecology / Cologne-based research team gather data for first comparative atlas of the gene expression response to stress in ecologically different plant species An international group of researchers have found out that the ability of certain plants to adapt to future environmental challenges by altering their

Health - Life Sciences - 24.06.2021
Versatile and reliable SARS-CoV-2 antibody assay
Versatile and reliable SARS-CoV-2 antibody assay
Automated microarray rapid test for detecting SARS-CoV-2 antibodies During the continued progression of the Corona pandemic, rapid, inexpensive, and reliable tests will become increasingly important to determine whether people have the associated antibodies - either through infection or vaccination. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now developed such a rapid antibody test.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.06.2021
New Findings on Body Axis Formation
New Findings on Body Axis Formation
Heidelberg researchers discover an enzyme that prevents the formation of multiple heads and axes in the freshwater polyp Hydra In the animal kingdom, specific growth factors control body axis development. These signalling molecules are produced by a small group of cells at one end of the embryo to be distributed in a graded fashion toward the opposite pole.

Earth Sciences - 24.06.2021
Continuous activity of small earthquakes makes mountains grow
Continuous activity of small earthquakes makes mountains grow
From a human perspective, earthquakes are natural disasters - in the past hundred years, they have caused more than 200,000 deaths and enormous economic damage. Mega-earthquakes with a magnitude of nine or higher on the Richter scale are considered a particular threat. Yet the inconceivable energy released in these events doesn't seem to affect the uplift of mountains, according to a new study by geoscientists at the University of Tübingen.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.06.2021
Rare Genetic Defect Replicated in Fish Model
A rare genetic defect that affects the so-called ALG2 gene can cause serious metabolic diseases in humans. It does so through the defective formation of proteins and sugar molecules. Until now, its rareness and complexity made it difficult to study this congenital glycosylation disorder.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.06.2021
Animal health through genomics
Animal health through genomics
Feasibility study: Preventing diseases through genome analysis and genome scissors Why are some animals more susceptible to diseases than others? Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) investigated this in more detail. They found genetic differences in livestock species that make individual animals less susceptible to certain diseases.

Chemistry - Physics - 22.06.2021
Producing hydrogen using less energy
Producing hydrogen using less energy
International research team describes complete reaction path for electrocatalytic hydrogen generation The way in which a compound inspired by nature produces hydrogen has now been described in detail for the first time by an international research team from the University of Jena and the University of Milan-Bicocca.

Health - 22.06.2021
How satiation can be controlled
How satiation can be controlled
Secretin hormone induces satiation by activating brown fat Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Finnish research institute Turku PET Centre have discovered a new mechanism controlling satiation. According to the recently published study, the hormone secretin induces satiation by activating brown adipose tissue.

Environment - History / Archeology - 21.06.2021
Environmental pollution as far back as antiquity: Finds in the ancient city of Jerash provide evidence of heavy metal contamination
Environmental pollution as far back as antiquity: Finds in the ancient city of Jerash provide evidence of heavy metal contamination
Current research shows that environmental pollution is a phenomenon found not only in modern times. Even in ancient times people suffered from lead poisoning. The Romans widely used this heavy metal as a material for their water pipes and sometimes even for sweetening wine. There is a fair amount of evidence for the extent and the influence of this contamination, and its impact on the global atmosphere can be tracked on the basis of Arctic ice core analyses.

Life Sciences - 18.06.2021
Stronger together: how protein filaments interact
Stronger together: how protein filaments interact
University of Göttingen research team investigate microtubules Just as the skeleton and muscles move the human body and hold its shape, all the cells of the body are stabilised and moved by a cellular skeleton. Unlike our skeleton, this cellular skeleton is a very dynamic structure, constantly changing and renewing itself.

Pedagogy - 18.06.2021
High-resolution microscope built from LEGO and bits of phone
Research led by Göttingen University shows constructing microscope improves children's understanding Microscopy is an essential tool in many fields of science and medicine. However, many groups have limited access to this technology due to its cost and fragility. Now, researchers from the Universities of Göttingen and Münster have succeeded in building a high-resolution microscope using nothing more than children's plastic building bricks and affordable parts from a mobile phone.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.06.2021
Tailored laser fields reveal properties of transparent crystals
Tailored laser fields reveal properties of transparent crystals
Research team led by the University of Göttingen investigates surface magnetisation The surface of a material often has properties that are very different from the properties within the material. For example, a non-conducting crystal, which actually exhibits no magnetism, can show magnetisation restricted to its surface because of the way the atoms are arranged there.
« Previous 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... 17 Next »