news 2021


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Results 101 - 120 of 332.


Life Sciences - Health - 29.07.2021
Energy for undisturbed rest
Energy for undisturbed rest
07/29/2021 In the fruit fly Drosophila, a hormone helps to balance rest and activity. This is shown by a new study of a research team led by the University of Würzburg. Might humans have a hormone with comparable function? Searching for food, eating, resting: in rough terms, this is the rhythm of life that many animals follow.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.07.2021
New regulators of the aging process
New regulators of the aging process
The attachment of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins (ubiquitination) regulates numerous biological processes, including signal transduction and metabolism / Scientists at the University of Cologne discover the link to aging and longevity / Publication in 'Nature'. Scientists have discovered that the protein ubiquitin plays an important role in the regulation of the aging process.

Materials Science - Health - 27.07.2021
First synthetic tissue model developed in which blood vessels can grow
First synthetic tissue model developed in which blood vessels can grow
Researchers investigate which material properties support vessel formation / Study published in the journal "Nature Communications" Using lab-created tissue to heal or replace damaged organs is one of the great visions for the future of medicine. Synthetic materials could be suitable as scaffolding for tissue because, unlike natural tissues, they remain stable in the organism long enough for the body to form new natural structures.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.07.2021
Model developed to predict the effect of antibody treatment in HIV infection
The dosage of broadly neutralizing antibodies determines the ability for virus replication / findings can contribute to design HIV therapy that can durably suppress the virus A Cologne-based research collaboration has found a way to predict the effect of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) on the growth rate of HIV-1.

Life Sciences - 23.07.2021
Animals are better sprinters
An interdisciplinary group of scientists from the universities of Cologne, Koblenz, Tübingen, and Stuttgart has studied the characteristics determining the maximum running speed in animals. The model they developed explains why humans cannot keep up with the fastest sprinters in the animal kingdom. Based on these calculations, the giant spider Shelob from 'The Lord of the Rings' would have reached a maximum speed of 60 km/h.

History / Archeology - 22.07.2021
Stone tool tells the story of Neanderthal hunting
Stone tool tells the story of Neanderthal hunting
65,000 years ago Neanderthal from the Swabian Jura hunted horses and reindeer with hafted leaf-shaped stone points. A newly discovered leaf point from the UNESCO World Heritage site of Hohle Fels Cave documents the evolution of hunting. A team under the direction of Professor Nicholas Conard for the University of Tübingen and the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment in southern Germany recovered the artifact underlying a layer dating to 65,000 years ago, which represents a minimum age for the find.

Chemistry - Physics - 22.07.2021
Silicon with a Two-Dimensional Structure
Silicon with a Two-Dimensional Structure
Heidelberg chemists succeed in producing synthesis and complete characterisation for the first time Silicon, a semi-metal, bonds in its natural form with four other elements and its three-dimensional structure takes the form of a tetrahedron. For a long time, it seemed impossible to achieve the synthesis and characterisation of a two-dimensional equivalent - geometrically speaking, a square.

Environment - Chemistry - 22.07.2021
Eco-friendly plastic from cellulose and water
Eco-friendly plastic from cellulose and water
Göttingen researchers create new kind of environmentally friendly bioplastic with hydroplastic polymers Plastics offer many benefits to society and are widely used in our daily life: they are lightweight, cheap and adaptable. However, the production, processing and disposal of plastics are simply not sustainable, and pose a major global threat to the environment and human health.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 21.07.2021
Long-period oscillations of the Sun discovered
Long-period oscillations of the Sun discovered
Ten years of data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory combined with numerical models reveal the deep low musical notes of the Sun   (mps) A team of solar physicists led by Professor Laurent Gizon of the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) and the University of Göttingen in Germany has reported the discovery of global oscillations of the Sun with very long periods, comparable to the 27-day solar rotation period.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2021
Cancer development is influenced by tissue type
Cancer development is influenced by tissue type
Why identical mutations cause different types of cancer Why do alterations of certain genes cause cancer only in specific organs of the human body? Scientists have now demonstrated that cells originating from different organs are differentially susceptible to activating mutations in cancer drivers: The same mutation in precursor cells of the pancreas or the bile duct leads to fundamental different outcomes.

Astronomy / Space Science - 19.07.2021
EHT pinpoints dark heart of the nearest radio galaxy
EHT pinpoints dark heart of the nearest radio galaxy
07/19/2021 Centaurus A, one of the closest active galaxies to Earth, belongs to the brightest objects in the sky. An international team has now imaged the heart of Centaurus A in unprecedented detail. Scientists from the University of Würzburg were involved. An international team around the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) Collaboration, known for capturing the first image of a black hole in the galaxy M87, has now imaged the heart of the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A in unprecedented detail.

Physics - 16.07.2021
Simplified method for calibrating optical tweezers: Broadband measurement of viscoelasticity with reduced measurement time
Simplified method for calibrating optical tweezers: Broadband measurement of viscoelasticity with reduced measurement time
Measurements of biomechanical properties inside living cells require minimally invasive methods. Optical tweezers are particularly attractive as a tool. It uses the momentum of light to trap and manipulate microor nanoscale particles. A team of researchers led by Cornelia Denz from the University of Münster has now developed a simplified method to perform the necessary calibration of the optical tweezers in the system under investigation.

Life Sciences - Physics - 15.07.2021
The virus trap
The virus trap
Hollow nano-objects made of DNA could trap viruses and render them harmless To date, there are no effective antidotes against most virus infections. An interdisciplinary research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed a new approach: they engulf and neutralize viruses with nano-capsules tailored from genetic material using the DNA origami method.

Economics / Business - 14.07.2021
Trust me, I'm a chatbot
Trust me, I’m a chatbot
Göttingen researchers investigate effect of non-human conversation partners in customer services   More and more companies are using chatbots in customer services. Due to advances in artificial intelligence and natural language processing, chatbots are often indistinguishable from humans when it comes to communication.

Life Sciences - 14.07.2021
Genome studies: more is not always better
Genome studies: more is not always better
07/14/2021 The characteristics of plants of the same species can have different genetic causes depending on their origin. This is shown by a recent study at the University of Würzburg. What the fruit fly is to zoologists, the thale cress is to botanists. The widespread herb with the botanical name Arabidopsis thaliana serves them as a model organism from which knowledge can be gained for other plants.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.07.2021
How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
Tracking future forest fires with AI As temperatures rise, the risk of devastating forest fires is increasing. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are using artificial intelligence to estimate the long-term impact that an increased number of forest fires will have on forest ecosystems.

Chemistry - 12.07.2021
Mechanical stimuli influence organ growth
Mechanical stimuli influence organ growth
Organoids help understand the complex interactions of cells and tissue In addition to chemical factors, mechanical influences play an important role in the natural growth of human organs such as kidneys, lungs and mammary glands - but also in the development of tumors. Now a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has investigated the process in detail using organoids, three-dimensional model systems of such organs which are produced in the laboratory.

Life Sciences - 12.07.2021
Starvation and other Stresses: Internal Sensor in Cells Coordinates Cellular Stress Response
Scientists in Cologne have discovered an important role for the protein complex mTORC1 that centrally regulates cell communication. The findings may lead to the development of new treatment methods in the future.

Life Sciences - 09.07.2021
Remote Control for Plants
Remote Control for Plants
Plant researchers have a potent new tool at disposal: Advances, a research team from Würzburg shows how to close the stomata of leaves using light pulses. Plants have microscopically small pores on the surface of their leaves, the stomata. With their help, they regulate the influx of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis.

Environment - 08.07.2021
CO2 storage through dead plant material
CO2 storage through dead plant material
Allowing plant residues to rot on the field is good for the climate Plants rotting in the soil are valuable for more than just compost. In fact, plant residues play a crucial role in keeping carbon in the soil, which is important for reducing the planet's CO2 emissions. This is the conclusion of a new study by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and other institutions.