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Results 61 - 80 of 317.


Health - Physics - 04.11.2020
Understanding the spread of infectious diseases
Understanding the spread of infectious diseases
Scientists worldwide have been working flat out on research into infectious diseases in the wake of the global outbreak of the COVID-19 disease, caused by the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. This concerns not only virologists, but also physicists, who are developing mathematical models to describe the spread of epidemics.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 03.11.2020
Innovative Material Concept for an Improved Silicon Anode
Innovative Material Concept for an Improved Silicon Anode
The lithium-ion battery is currently state of the art, but has not yet realised its full potential. New electrode materials such as silicon instead of pure graphite in the anode offer a significantly increased electrochemical performance. Until now, this has been at the expense of the battery's lifespan.

Environment - 02.11.2020
From nitrate crisis to phosphate crisis?
From nitrate crisis to phosphate crisis?
International research team including Göttingen University call for a Europe-wide phosphate directive The aim of the EU Nitrates Directive is to reduce nitrates leaking into the environment in order to prevent pollution of water supplies. The widely accepted view is that this will also help protect threatened plant species which can be damaged by high levels of nutrients like nitrates in the soil and water.

Environment - 02.11.2020
Consequences of Glacier Shrinkage
Researchers from the South Asia Institute and the Heidelberg Center for the Environment of Ruperto Carola investigated the causes of a glacial lake outburst with subsequent flooding in the Ladakh region of India. In order to frame the case study in a larger picture, the research team led by geographer Marcus Nüsser used satellite images to create a comprehensive survey of glacial lakes for the entire Trans-Himalyan region of Ladakh.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.11.2020
How the immune system remembers viruses
How the immune system remembers viruses
Immune response: memory T cells are formed earlier than previously thought For a person to acquire immunity to a disease, T cells must develop into memory cells after contact with the pathogen. Until now, the number of cells that do this was believed to depend above all on the magnitude of the initial immune response.

Physics - Materials Science - 30.10.2020
Novel Photoresist Developed
Researchers in the -3D Matter Made to Order- Cluster of Excellence expand possibilities of three-dimensional printing of the tiniest microstructures Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Heidelberg University have developed a novel photoresist for two-photon microprinting. For the first time, it can be used to produce three-dimensional microstructures with cavities in the nano-range.

Materials Science - 29.10.2020
Knowledge Modules for Battery Cells
Knowledge Modules for Battery Cells "Made in Germany"
The production of battery cells includes many consecutive process steps. There is mixing, stirring, coating, rolling, cutting and stacking. Scientists at ProZell work to improve the quality of the final product, make production more cost-effective and environmentally friendly. The competence cluster for battery cell production, in which MEET Battery Research Center of University of Münster and Helmholtz Institute Münster (HI MS) of Forschungszentrum Jülich participate, is supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF).

Life Sciences - Environment - 29.10.2020
The seductive scent of sweet fruits
The seductive scent of sweet fruits
New research group investigates the communication between plants and their consumers A new research area will be established at the Friedrich Schiller University. From November 2020, the biologist Dr Omer Nevo will head the new Junior Research Group "Evolutionary Ecology", that works at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) in Leipzig.

Life Sciences - 29.10.2020
Beetle larvae think with a brain 'under construction'
Beetle larvae think with a brain ’under construction’
Researchers at the University of Göttingen compare the development of beetle brains with that of flies In the human brain, hundreds of billions of nerve cells are interconnected in the most complicated way, and only when these interconnections are correctly made, can the brain function properly. This is no different for insects, even though their brains consist of -only- one hundred thousand to one million nerve cells.

Chemistry - Physics - 29.10.2020
Smart bottle brushes
Smart bottle brushes
Neutrons make structural changes in molecular brushes visible They look like microscopic bottle brushes: Polymers with a backbone and tufts of side arms. This molecular design gives them unusual abilities: For example, they can bind active agents and release them again when the temperature changes. With the help of neutrons, a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded to unveil the changes in the internal structure in course of the process.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.10.2020
Biodiversity monitoring programmes need a culture of collaboration
Biodiversity monitoring programmes need a culture of collaboration
Integration of contributors promotes the quantity and quality of data Biodiversity loss is continuing relentlessly worldwide. In order to counteract this more effectively, monitoring programmes are needed which precisely map the circumstances of animal and plant species and the extent to which they are under threat.

Environment - 27.10.2020
Intensive Land Management Impairing Ecosystem Interactions
Intensive Land Management Impairing Ecosystem Interactions
High land-use intensity reduces the beneficial effects of biodiversity on ecosystem services. This is the main result of a study conducted by an international team led by researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the University of Bern.

Environment - 27.10.2020
Land management in forest and grasslands: how much can we intensify?
Land management in forest and grasslands: how much can we intensify?
<p><em><strong>Based on a media release by the University of Bern</strong></em></p> <p><strong>Leipzig/Bern. High land-use intensity reduces the beneficial effects of biodiversity on ecosystem services. This is the main result of a study conducted by an international team led by researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the University of Bern.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.10.2020
Shifts in Flowering Phases of Plants Due to Reduced Insect Density
Shifts in Flowering Phases of Plants Due to Reduced Insect Density
It still sounds unlikely today, but declines in insect numbers could well make it a frequent occurrence in the future: fields full of flowers, but not a bee in sight. A research group of the University of Jena and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) has discovered that insects have a decisive influence on the biodiversity and flowering phases of plants.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.10.2020
On the way to fish-friendly hydropower
On the way to fish-friendly hydropower
EU project "FIThydro" studies environmental impact of hydroelectric power plants In the Europe-wide project "FIThydro" coordinated by the Technical University of Munich (TUM), researchers worked with industrial partners to study existing hydroelectric power plants. Based on their results, they have developed new assessment methods and technologies such as a fish population hazard index, fish migration simulations and an open-access decision support tool for power plant planning.

Life Sciences - Physics - 27.10.2020
Zombification of plants
Zombification of plants
Phytoplasma effector proteins devastate host plants through molecular mimicry Phytoplasma are a type of bacteria that live within the cells and cause devastating diseases with damaging effects. For example, in many cases plants infected with phytoplasma are no longer able to develop flowers. These plants have actually been described as "zombies," since they allow the reproduction of phytoplasma but are unable to reproduce themselves anymore.

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.10.2020
A molecular break for root growth
A molecular break for root growth
Length of plant roots is controlled by hormones The dynamic change in root growth of plants plays an important role in their adjustment to soil conditions. Depending on the location, nutrients or moisture can be found in higher or lower soil layers. This is why, depending on the situation, a short or a long root is advantageous.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 26.10.2020
Molecular water discovered on the moon by the SOFIA flying observatory
Molecular water discovered on the moon by the SOFIA flying observatory
For the first time, the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) flying observatory has provided direct and unambiguous evidence of water molecules on the moon beyond the permanent shadow at the poles. The infrared observatory, which is owned jointly by the US space agency NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) was able to detect the molecules in the moon's southern hemisphere using the FORCAST (Faint Object InfraRed CAmera for the SOFIA-Telescope) instrument.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 23.10.2020
How "protein factories" mature
Ribosomes are small "factories" in which proteins are assembled according to genetic construction plans. The maturation of ribosomes, of which every human cell contains up to a million, is a complicated, multi-phase process. Now, with the aid of cryo-electron microscopy, scientists from Heidelberg University and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München have been able to clarify an important step in ribosomal formation.

Pharmacology - Health - 23.10.2020
Is Antimicrobial Resistance Evolution Accelerating?
A team of researchers from Freie Universität Berlin and ETH Zurich studied if antifungal and antibiotic resistance emerge faster than in the past No 199/2020 from Oct 23, 2020 Scientists from Freie Universität Berlin and Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETH Zurich) investigated how long it takes for resistance to emerge after the introduction of a new antifungal or antibiotic.