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Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 08.02.2019
From Cambridge to Jena
From Cambridge to Jena
Pharmacologists have succeeded in almost completely suppressing the development of opioid tolerance Light Life Through genetic changes to the opioid receptor in mice, pharmacologists at Jena University Hospital have succeeded in almost completely suppressing the development of opioid tolerance. The pain-relieving effect actually improved and continued even when the drug was administered for longer periods.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 30.01.2019
New Findings About Anti-Malaria Drug
New Findings About Anti-Malaria Drug
01/30/2019 Researchers at the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg have unveiled the molecular effectiveness of artemisinins. The findings could lead to drugs for diseases such as Alzheimer's, schizophrenia and epilepsy. Artemisinin is derived from the leaves and flowers of the annual mugwort (Artemisia annua) and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 22.01.2019
Chemists develop new synthesis method for producing fluorinated piperidines
Chemists develop new synthesis method for producing fluorinated piperidines
Synthetic molecules are essential for many products in our lives: medicines, crop protection agents or special materials such as Teflon. These molecules have several components, which can be combined in a variety of ways, resulting in different properties. Both so-called piperidines and fluorinated groups are particularly important.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 08.01.2019
Anticancer Drugs Formed through Molecular Evolution
Scientists at Freie Universität Explore Alternative Routes to Drugs against Tumor Cells / Findings published in online journal "Nature Communications" No 002/2019 from Jan 08, 2019 Scientists at Freie Universität Berlin have discovered an alternative route to drugs against tumor cells. The group led by Jörg Rademann from the Institute of Pharmacy examined the protein STAT5, which is responsible for the aggressive growth of human leukemia cells.