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Oliver Lieleg and PhD student Ceren Kimna use balls and pipe cleaners in differe
Oliver Lieleg and PhD student Ceren Kimna use balls and pipe cleaners in different colors to visualize how nanoparticles can be bound together by DNA fragments. Such connections may become the basis of drugs that release their active ingredients in sequence. Image: Uli Benz / TUM
It is becoming much more common for patients to be treated with several different medications. It is often necessary for the patient to take them at fixed intervals - a limitation that makes everyday life difficult and increases the risk of doses being skipped or forgotten.

Oliver Lieleg , Professor of Biomechanics and a member of the Munich School of BioEngineering at TUM, and doctoral candidate Ceren Kimna have now developed a process that could serve as the basis for medications containing several active ingredients that would reliably release them in the body in a pre-defined sequence at specified times. ...
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