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Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 08.02.2019
From Cambridge to Jena
From Cambridge to Jena
Pharmacologists have succeeded in almost completely suppressing the development of opioid tolerance Light Life Through genetic changes to the opioid receptor in mice, pharmacologists at Jena University Hospital have succeeded in almost completely suppressing the development of opioid tolerance. The pain-relieving effect actually improved and continued even when the drug was administered for longer periods.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.02.2019
How plants cope with iron deficiency: Botany
How plants cope with iron deficiency: Botany
Iron is an essential nutrient for plants, animals and also for humans. It is needed for a diverse range of metabolic processes, for example for photosynthesis and for respiration. If a person is lacking iron, this leads to a major negative impact on health. Millions of people around the globe suffer from iron deficiency each year.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 30.01.2019
New Findings About Anti-Malaria Drug
New Findings About Anti-Malaria Drug
01/30/2019 Researchers at the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg have unveiled the molecular effectiveness of artemisinins. The findings could lead to drugs for diseases such as Alzheimer's, schizophrenia and epilepsy. Artemisinin is derived from the leaves and flowers of the annual mugwort (Artemisia annua) and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries.

Life Sciences - 22.01.2019
Bifacial Stem Cells Produce Wood and Bast
Bifacial Stem Cells Produce Wood and Bast
So-called bifacial stem cells are responsible for one of the most critical growth processes on Earth - the formation of wood. By alternately developing into wood and bast cells, these stem cells are thus starting points for forming wood as well as generating plant bast fibres. A team of researchers from Heidelberg University was recently able to demonstrate this phenomenon using new experimental tools.

Life Sciences - 22.01.2019
Bifacial Stem Cells Produce Wood and Bast
Heidelberg researchers study one of the most important growth processes on Earth So-called bifacial stem cells are responsible for one of the most critical growth processes on Earth - the formation of wood. By alternately developing into wood and bast cells, these stem cells are thus starting points for forming wood as well as generating plant bast fibres.

Life Sciences - 21.01.2019
Opioids: no effect without side effect
Opioids: no effect without side effect
Interdisciplinary research team uses innovative methodology to make a nearly 300 million-year-old fossil from Thuringia walk again. Life An international research team has used robotics and biomechanics to recreate the movements of an early terrestrial vertebrate. The team, with members from Humboldt University in Berlin (HU), Friedrich Schiller University in Jena and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), studied the fossil finds of Orobates pabsti a four-legged creature approximately one metre long.

Life Sciences - 16.01.2019
From fossil to robot and back again
From fossil to robot and back again
Interdisciplinary research team uses innovative methodology to make a nearly 300 million-year-old fossil from Thuringia walk again. An international research team has used robotics and biomechanics to recreate the movements of an early terrestrial vertebrate. The team, with members from Humboldt University in Berlin (HU), Friedrich Schiller University in Jena and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), studied the fossil finds of Orobates pabsti a four-legged creature approximately one metre long.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 08.01.2019
Anticancer Drugs Formed through Molecular Evolution
Scientists at Freie Universität Explore Alternative Routes to Drugs against Tumor Cells / Findings published in online journal "Nature Communications" No 002/2019 from Jan 08, 2019 Scientists at Freie Universität Berlin have discovered an alternative route to drugs against tumor cells. The group led by Jörg Rademann from the Institute of Pharmacy examined the protein STAT5, which is responsible for the aggressive growth of human leukemia cells.

Life Sciences - 08.01.2019
Longer siesta on bright days
Longer siesta on bright days
Insects and mammals have special sensors for different light intensities. These sensors selectively influence the circadian clocks and thereby control daily activity patterns. Increasing sunlight intensity extends the sleep duration and results in a longer midday siesta which delays the resumption of activity to the evening.