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Life Sciences - Health - 19.06.2019
Cell Division at High Speed
Cell Division at High Speed
06/19/2019 When two proteins work together, this worsens the prognosis for lung cancer patients: their chances of survival are particularly poor in this case. In malignant tumours, the cells usually proliferate quickly and uncontrollably. A research team from the Biocenter of Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg in Bavaria, Germany, has discovered that two important regulators of cell division can interact in this process.

Life Sciences - 14.06.2019
Exciting Plant Vacuoles
Exciting Plant Vacuoles
06/14/2019 Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process. The function of this channel, which is also found in humans, has been a mystery so far. Many plant processes are not different from humans: Cells and tissues in grain plants, including maize also communicate through electrical signals.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.06.2019
Why does dandelion never fall ill?
Why does dandelion never fall ill?
Researchers at Münster University find out that dandelion possesses enzymes that have untypical abilities for plants / Study in "Angewandte Chemie' Plants possess enzymes called polyphenoloxidases, which can oxidize certain chemical compounds and thus produce the typical brown colour that we know, for example, from freshly cut apples.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 23.05.2019
German Research Foundation Extends Funding for Two Collaborative Research Centers at Freie Universität Berlin
Researchers study the dynamics of living together and the scaffolding of membranes No 146/2019 from May 23, 2019 The German Research Foundation (DFG) has extended the funding for two Collaborative Research Centers (CRC) at Freie Universität. One is CRC 958, where scientists study the molecular mechanisms by which dynamically organized protein-protein assemblies scaffold cellular membranes.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.05.2019
Microbial Systems Open a New Chapter in Biosphere Research
A New Study from Freie Universität Berlin in Cooperation with the University of Virginia No 139/2019 from May 21, 2019 In a recent study, biologists from Freie Universität Berlin and the University of Virginia (USA) examine ideas about closed ecological systems and how to further develop them. The goal of the study is to establish concepts that will make it possible to conduct experiments with self-sustaining ecosystems.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.05.2019
Second grant to bring research to market
05/14/2019 Getting an accurate picture of the real-time transcriptional activity of a cell: This is the goal of a new research project at the University of Würzburg which is funded by the European Research Council. If you paid attention during biology lessons, you may remember that genetic information in human cells is contained in the cell nucleus as a DNA double helix.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 08.05.2019
Researchers take a step towards light-based, brain-like computing chip
Researchers take a step towards light-based, brain-like computing chip
New light-based hardware which can store and process information in a similar way to the human brain / Study published in "Nature" journal A technology that functions like a brain? In these times of artificial intelligence, this no longer seems so far-fetched - for example, when a mobile phone can recognise faces or languages.

Life Sciences - Physics - 07.05.2019
Trigger for directed cell motion
When an individual cell is placed on a level surface, it does not keep still, but starts moving. This phenomenon was observed by the British cell biologist Michael Abercrombie as long ago as 1967. Since then, researchers have been thriving to understand how cells accomplish this feat. This much is known: cells form so-called lamellipodia - cellular protrusions that continuously grow and contract - to propel themselves towards signalling cues such as chemical attractants produced and secreted by other cells.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 11.04.2019
How plants defend themselves
How plants defend themselves
Like humans and animals, plants defend themselves against pathogens with the help of their immune system. But how do they activate their cellular defenses' Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered that receptors in plant cells identify bacteria through simple molecular building blocks.

Life Sciences - 11.04.2019
Reproduction: How male flies enforce their interests
Reproduction: How male flies enforce their interests
The fundamental biological process of reproduction can differ greatly from animal species to species. Both males and females sometimes evolve creative strategies in pursuing their interests in these mating interactions. This has been studied for quite some time in small species such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, where the female receives proteins through the male's seminal fluid - which, after the actual mating, leads to radical changes in her behaviour and in the processes occurring inside her body.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.04.2019
New Pathways for Sustainable Agriculture
New Pathways for Sustainable Agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. This is the result of a new study by the University of Würzburg. Hedges, flowering strips and other seminatural habitats provide food and nesting places for insects and birds in agricultural landscapes.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 04.04.2019
How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?
How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?
Muscles are connected to tendons to power animal movements such as running, swimming or flying. Forces are produced by contractile chains of the proteins actin and myosin, which are pulling on muscle-tendon connections called attachments. During animal development, these muscle-tendon attachments must be established such that they resist high mechanical forces for the entire life of the animal.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 03.04.2019
Tipping the scales
Tipping the scales
Human cells have a sophisticated regulatory system at their disposal: labeling proteins with the small molecule ubiquitin. In a first, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has succeeded in marking proteins with ubiquitin in a targeted manner, in test tubes as well as in living cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.04.2019
Unit approved
A new international research group aims to develop new approaches to prevent and treat cytomegalovirus infection. Lars Dölken, a virology expert from Würzburg, is the research unit's spokesman. "Cytomegalovirus, beware of this new research group!" This could be the motto of a new research unit recently approved by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

Life Sciences - 01.04.2019
Traffic Jam In The Cell: How Are Proteins Assigned To Specific Transporters?
Traffic Jam In The Cell: How Are Proteins Assigned To Specific Transporters?
A fundamental cellular mechanism ensures that proteins are transported to the places they are needed in the cells. So-called vesicles are responsible for that transport. Determining their composition has been difficult up to now, not least because of their short life span. By combining innovative investigative techniques, biochemists at Heidelberg University have succeeded in analysing two of these transport vesicles - the COPI and COPII vesicles - comprehensively for the first time.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.04.2019
"Don’t worry! We have the viruses under control": Series: ’Under wraps at the University of Münster’
Stephan Ludwig puzzles over a host of questions. There is nothing unusual about that when someone has a passion for science. As a molecular biologist, however, Professor Ludwig is particularly interested in one specific question which is of paramount importance: How do viruses - ‘these tiny little mites', as he calls them - succeed in remodelling a somatic cell in such a way that they can reproduce inside it, making the host organism sick or even killing it? “We still know very little about the interaction between the pathogen, the cell, and the host organism.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.03.2019
A cellular protein as a
A cellular protein as a "Gas Pump Attendant" of Cancer Development
03/29/2019 Scientists at the University of Würzburg have discovered a new mechanism of gene transcription in tumor cells. Their study identifies novel strategies to develop innovative anti-Cancer drugs. The cells which make up our body vary significantly. A liver cell does not look like a muscle cell and each has a unique function.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.03.2019
Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in Global Change
Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in Global Change
03/28/2019 Land use in tropical mountain regions leads to considerable changes of biodiversity and ecological functions. The intensity of such changes is greatly affected by the climate. 2019 marks the 250 th anniversary of Alexander von Humboldt. He was one of the first naturalists to document the distribution and adaptation of species on tropical mountains in the 19 th century.

Life Sciences - 26.03.2019
Looking into the fly's brain
Looking into the fly’s brain
They take up little space and are easy to breed; because they are easy to look after, fruit flies or Drosophila melanogaster are used as laboratory animals in research institutes all over the world. However, that is not the only reason why they are one of the most important model organisms that are studied by geneticists.

Life Sciences - 26.03.2019
Duckweed: The low-down on a tiny plant
Duckweed: The low-down on a tiny plant
Duckweeds - for many aquatic animals like ducks and snails, a treat, but for pond owners, sometimes a thorn in the side. The tiny and fast-growing plants are of great interest to researchers, and not at least because of their industrial applications - for example, to purify wastewater or generate energy.