news 2018


Category


Years
2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009


Results 41 - 60 of 145.


Life Sciences - Chemistry - 04.09.2018
Zika virus proteins inhibit brain development
Zika virus proteins inhibit brain development
In healthy individuals, the Zika virus causes flu-like symptoms. If a pregnant woman becomes infected, the unborn child can suffer from severe brain abnormalities as a result of mechanisms that have not yet been explained. A study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPI-B) shows that Zika virus proteins bind to cellular proteins that are required for neural development.

Civil Engineering - 03.09.2018
A thinner bridge with enormous strength
A thinner bridge with enormous strength
The first railroad bridge in Germany made of ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) has gone into operation on Bavaria's Tegernsee-Bahn railroad route near Gmund. The innovative high-performance concrete made it possible to build a particularly thin bridge. Engineers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) planned the project and provided scientific supervision.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.08.2018
Presynapses come in a packet
Presynapses come in a packet
No 223/2018 from Aug 30, 2018 Synapses are the interfaces for information exchange between neurons. Teams of scientists working with Volker Haucke, Director at the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) and Professor at Freie Universität Berlin, and Stephan Sigrist at Freie Universität Berlin discovered the materials, which form new presynapses for the release of transmitters.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.08.2018
Precise, Highly Efficient Gene Repair
Precise, Highly Efficient Gene Repair
The molecular tool CRISPR/Cas allows introducing DNA double strand breaks into any gene of interest consequently resulting in stochastic mutations at the site of the target gene. However, precise gene repair through the application of a rescue construct suffers from limited efficiency. Researchers at Heidelberg University have now found a solution for this problem.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 29.08.2018
Food activates brown fat
Brown fat consumes energy, which is the reason why it could be important for preventing obesity and diabetes. Working together with an international team, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) were able to demonstrate that food also increases the thermogenesis of brown fat, and not just cold as previously assumed.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.08.2018
Protection For Nerve Cells Delivered Through The Nose
Protection For Nerve Cells Delivered Through The Nose
Protective proteins that mitigate the destruction of nerve cells after a stroke can be administered into the brain through the nose, as Heidelberg University researchers demonstrated using a mouse model. The team led by Hilmar Bading at the Interdisciplinary Center for Neurosciences (IZN) is laying the scientific groundwork for new forms of therapy that inhibit degenerative processes in humans.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.08.2018
The Dimension of a Space Can Be Inferred From the Abstract Network Structure
Networks describe relations between objects. They show how objects relate to one another and which ones are mutually influential. In this context, how does space impact structure? Geoinformatics scientist Dr Franz-Benjamin Mocnik was particularly interested in answering this question. In his study, the Heidelberg University researcher demonstrated that the spatial reference can be identified in a number of datasets of different thematic networks.

Life Sciences - Physics - 17.08.2018
Nanotechnology vs. Viruses
No 214/2018 from Aug 17, 2018 An international interdisciplinary team of virologists and biochemists that includes scientists at Freie Universität has developed low-cost and "cell-friendly" nanogels that can efficiently prevent viral infections. The flexible nanogels mimic cell surface receptors where several viral families bind.

Earth Sciences - 14.08.2018
Mountains in motion
Mountains in motion
The Alps are on the go: The mountain range drifts northwards an average of one-half millimeter every year and rises 1.8 millimeters. However, there are strong regional variances. In order to follow these movements, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have evaluated measurements made by more than 300 GPS antennas over a period of twelve years.

Environment - 14.08.2018
Trees and climate change: Faster growth, lighter wood
Trees and climate change: Faster growth, lighter wood
Trees are growing more rapidly due to climate change. This sounds like good news. After all, this means that trees are storing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in their wood and hence taking away the key ingredient in global warming. But is it that simple? A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) analyzed wood samples from the oldest existing experimental areas spanning a period of 150 years - and reached a surprising conclusion.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.08.2018
Microbial composition influences genes linked to skin barrier maintenance
Microbial composition influences genes linked to skin barrier maintenance
Certain bacteria occur frequently and foremost on the skin of people with atopic dermatitis, and it is known that this disease seriously compromises the skin's barrier function. Researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München have now discovered how the two facts become correlated.

Environment - 09.08.2018
Artificial Glaciers in Response to Climate Change?
Artificial Glaciers in Response to Climate Change?
Receding glaciers and dwindling snowfalls pose a threat to meltwater-dependent agriculture in large parts of the high mountain regions of South Asia. A research team led by Marcus Nüsser of Heidelberg University's South Asia Institute conducted a long-term study to determine how creating ice reservoirs, commonly called artificial glaciers, might help counteract seasonal water scarcity.

Life Sciences - Environment - 09.08.2018
Microplastics: Dangerous for the Soil?
Microplastics: Dangerous for the Soil?
No 210/2018 from Aug 09, 2018 A team of scientists at Freie Universität investigated the geological and biological effects of microscopic plastic particles on the soil and its microbes. Soil microorganisms play a central role in many biogeochemical cycles, such as the decomoposition of organic matter and the binding of carbon in soil.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.08.2018
Alzheimer's disease and diabetes: Hope for inhibitors against amyloid plaques
Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes: Hope for inhibitors against amyloid plaques
Effective therapeutics to counteract the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes are not yet available. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now come a little bit closer to a solution: They have described a new class of designed macrocyclic peptides that are highly potent inhibitors of amyloid formation.

Chemistry - Physics - 07.08.2018
Chemists present new reaction path: Symmetrical cleavage of disulphides is fast and biocompatible
Chemists present new reaction path: Symmetrical cleavage of disulphides is fast and biocompatible
A team of researchers led by Prof. Frank Glorius and Michael Teders from the University of Münster and by Prof. Dirk Guldi from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg have presented a new chemical reaction path which may prove to be of interest both for research and for the production of active ingredients in medicines.

Mathematics - Physics - 06.08.2018
"No one can be this lucky": Mathematician Prof. Raimar Wulkenhaar talks about solving a seemingly unsolvable equation
After ten years, Prof. Raimar Wulkenhaar from the University of Münster's Mathematical Institute and his colleague Dr. Erik Panzer from the University of Oxford have solved a mathematical equation which was considered to be unsolvable. The equation is to be used to find answers to questions posed by elementary particle physics.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.08.2018
A blood test instead of a brain scan
Brain trauma caused by injury to the head can have grave consequences. Diagnosis is usually made on the basis of a CT scan. Now, a new blood test can be used to rule out severe injury in the first place. An international research team, including scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), have presented their findings in Lancet Neurology.

Civil Engineering - 30.07.2018
Bending The Rules
Bending The Rules
Steel bridges cost a lot of money to build. It's been estimated that the new motorway viaduct near Oberthulba in Bavaria will cost around 85 million Euros. Planners know that in order to save on material costs, build components should be designed with as much openwork as possible, whilst maintaining stability.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.07.2018
Pungent tasting substance in ginger reduces bad breath
Pungent tasting substance in ginger reduces bad breath
The pungent compound 6-gingerol, a constituent of ginger, stimulates an enzyme contained in saliva - an enzyme which breaks down foul-smelling substances. It thus ensures fresh breath and a better aftertaste. Citric acid, on the other hand, increases the sodium ion content of saliva, making salty foods taste less salty.

Computer Science - Innovation - 26.07.2018
Explaining machine learning
Explaining machine learning
New video clarifies important elements of artificial intelligence in lay terms The University of Tübingen has produced a short film explaining the significance of research into machine learning. "In recent months there have been many media reports on the development of artificial intelligence and machine learning," Matthias Bethge explains.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |