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Results 41 - 60 of 67.


Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2016
Gene mutation causes juvenile mortality in calves
Gene mutation causes juvenile mortality in calves
Research news Based on genome data, breeders and scientists are able to determine which hereditary factors and which genetic diseases cattle pass on to their offspring. A mutation located on chromosome 19, for example, is responsible for recurring respiratory diseases and juvenile mortality in calves.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.06.2016
Four new risk genes associated with multiple sclerosis discovered
Four new risk genes associated with multiple sclerosis discovered
Research news Scientists of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry have identified four new risk genes that are altered in German patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The results point to a possible involvement of cellular mechanisms in the development of the disease, through which environmental influences affect gene regulation.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.06.2016
Mechanism of thalidomide
Mechanism of thalidomide
Research news In the 1950s, thalidomide (Contergan) was prescribed as a sedative drug to pregnant women, resulting in a great number of infants with serious malformations. Up to now, the reasons for these disastrous birth defects have remained unclear. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have at last identified the molecular mechanism of thalidomide.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.06.2016
A diet lacking in zinc is detrimental to human and animal health
Research news The trace element zinc has an impact on the essential metabolic functions of most living organisms. New research carried out by the Chair of Animal Nutrition at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has found that even minimal zinc deficiency impairs digestion, albeit without any typical symptoms such as skin problems or fatigue.

Health - 27.05.2016
Telling irregularities
Telling irregularities
Research news The heart rate may be an indicator of a person's life expectancy. A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has to this end analyzed an effect which at first seems paradoxical: Minor irregularities in the heartbeat are indicative of a healthy body. A clinical study confirmed a strong correlation between this phenomenon and the survival prospects of heart attack patients.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.05.2016
From Münster to Houston
Sometimes an internship abroad can serve as a springboard for an international career - or it turns into a full-time job.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.05.2016
Lethal reawakening
Retroviral DNAs integrate into host genomes, but their expression is normally repressed by cellular defense mechanisms. As an LMU team now shows, when these measures fail, accumulation of viral proteins may trigger programmed cell death. Mammalian DNAs contain large numbers of sequences that are derived from retroviral genomes, which integrated into the germline of the host and were passed on to its descendants during the course of evolution.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.05.2016
How Fish Can Regenerate Eye Injuries at the Cellular Level
How Fish Can Regenerate Eye Injuries at the Cellular Level
Confocal microscopy image of a section through the medaka fish retina. Single Müller glia and photoreceptor cells are labelled in different colours by a genetic system (red, green, yellow). Atoh7 expression in Müller glia cells leads a regeneration response in the absence of injury, including expansion of the cell soma and neurogenic cluster formation.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.04.2016
A look at the digital medicine of the future
A look at the digital medicine of the future
In the future, there may be medication that is tailored individually to each patient. Doctors might operate wearing 3D data glasses and thus be able to work with greater precision. Diagnosing rare diseases, which today can still take years, could be done in a matter of days. And we might even have therapies to combat mental illnesses such as schizophrenia.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.04.2016
Researchers block gene activity in bone tumors
Researchers block gene activity in bone tumors
Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in inhibiting the growth and spread of Ewing sarcoma in animal models. This type of bone tumor predominantly occurs in children and adolescents. The researchers have been able to significantly alter the gene activity underlying the tumor's formation, opening up new avenues for potential treatment strategies.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.03.2016
An alternative route to inflammation
Using a combination of newly developed methods, researchers led by LMU immunologist Veit Hornung have defined a previously unknown pathway that triggers inflammation. The immune system in vertebrates is capable of distinguishing "self" from "non-self" components, which enables recognition and destruction of invasive pathogens and aberrant cell types such as tumor cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.03.2016
Hospital hygienists' fear
Hospital hygienists’ fear
So-called hospital germs are a big worry for physicians and hygiene specialists as these bacteria can spell danger for people with a weakened immune system. This is especially true when the germs are resistant to one or more antibiotics and surround themselves with a so-called biofilm as a sort of protective shield.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2016
Obesity and diabetes can be epigenetically inherited
Diet-induced obesity and diabetes can be epigenetically* inherited by the offspring via both oocytes and sperm. Scientists from Technical University of Munich in collaboration with researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) have shown that. For its studies, the team used mice that had become obese and had developed type 2 diabetes due to a high-fat diet.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.03.2016
The gut: performing into old age
The gut: performing into old age
A breakthrough in basic research and the first comprehensive study on the secretory activity of the human intestine: over a period of eight years, Dr. Dagmar Krüger of the Department of Human Biology at TU Munich has examined more than 2200 specimens from around 450 patients with bowel disease.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 09.03.2016
Research Combats Antibiotic-resistant Pathogens in Poultry
German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture Grants Amounting to 2. Million Euros for EsRAM Research Collaboration Based at Freie Universität Berlin That Studies Ways to Reduce Antibiotic-resistant Pathogens in Poultry / Five Press Images The German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) is sponsoring a new research network to explore antibiotic-resistant pathogens in poultry and ultimately, to reduce them.

Health - Chemistry - 07.03.2016
"Master switch" for chronic infections
Certain viral diseases have a tendency to become chronic - HIV being a notable example. The patient's immune response is simply not effective enough to eliminate the virus permanently. Researchers at the University of Bonn working with colleagues from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Cologne have now identified an important immune factor which is partially responsible for this immune response.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.03.2016
Early biomarker defined
A multicenter study led by LMU's Christian Haass and Michael Ewers has identified a biomarker associated with the activation of an innate immune response to neural damage during early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease results from the accumulation in the brain of protein deposits that are toxic to nerve cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.03.2016
Using Trojan horses to combat microorganisms
Using Trojan horses to combat microorganisms
Bacterial infections can have serious consequences - for example, when the microorganisms colonize an artificial heart valve or some other prosthesis. There is especially problematic when the bacteria are resistant to several antibiotics. Researchers are therefore looking for new methods of treatment as well as for ways to find centres of infection in the body.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.02.2016
Potential target against the Yoyo dieting effect
Potential target against the Yoyo dieting effect
A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU) and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) has identified a new mechanism that regulates the effect of the satiety hormone leptin. The study published in the journal 'Nature ' identified the enzyme HDAC5 as key factor in our control of body weight and food intake and potential target against the Yoyo dieting effect.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.02.2016
Fragile bacterial community in the gut
Iron deficiency is often an issue in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. An international and interdisciplinary research group under the aegis of the ZIEL Institute for Food & Health (ZIEL) at the TU Munich has now investigated how the intestinal microbiota responds to oral or intravenous iron replacement.