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Results 21 - 40 of 67.


Media - Health - 26.08.2016
Omega-3 fatty acids against vascular calcification
Omega-3 fatty acids against vascular calcification
Atherosclerosis - commonly known as "hardening of the arteries" - occurs when deposits on the inner walls of vessels lead to chronic inflammation and narrowing of the vessels. That can restrict blood flow or block it entirely, ultimately triggering a cardiac infarction or a stroke. Treatment strategies up to now focus primarily on inhibiting the inflammation reaction.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.08.2016
A clear view of the nervous system
A clear view of the nervous system
A new and versatile imaging technique enables researchers to trace the trajectories of whole nerve cells and provides extensive insights into the structure of neuronal networks. Lesions caused by traumatic brain damage, stroke and functional decline due to aging processes can disrupt the complex cellular network that constitutes the central nervous system, and lead to chronic pathologies, such as dementia, epilepsy and deleterious metabolic perturbations.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2016
The first stage of the cascade
The first stage of the cascade
Research news G proteins are molecular switches on the insides of cell membranes. They convey important signals to the inner workings of the cells. The associated receptors are targeted by all kinds of medications. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are now shedding light on precisely how the individual amino acids of the G protein move during the switching process.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.08.2016
Discovery of a brain sugar switch
Discovery of a brain sugar switch
Research news Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) discovered that our brain actively takes sugar from the blood. Prior to this, researchers around the world had assumed that this was a purely passive process. An international team led by diabetes expert Matthias Tschöp reported in the journal 'Cell' that transportation of sugar into the brain is regulated by so-called glia cells that react to hormones such as insulin or leptin; previously it was thought that this was only possible for neurons.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.08.2016
Mouse gut bacteria find a new home
Mouse gut bacteria find a new home
Research news Mouse models are extensively used in pharmaceutical and medical research, and it is known that the communities of microbes in their intestine. can have a significant impact on the research output. However, there is still insufficient information available about many bacteria inhabiting the intestine of mice.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.08.2016
274 from Aug 11, 2016 New Insights into Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Scientists at Freie Universität Publish New Findings of a Study on Effects of Anti-Inflammatory Peptides in Skin Cells
Scientists at Freie Universität Publish New Findings of a Study on Effects of Anti-Inflammatory Peptides in Skin Cells ' 274/2016 from Aug 11, 2016 Scientists at Freie Universität have investigated the effect of synthetic peptides. "We were able to demonstrate that peptides developed by the Research Center Borstel - Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences have a very good anti-inflammatory effect in different cell types of human skin," said Günther Weindl at the Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmacology, and Toxicology, Freie Universität, who led the experiment.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.08.2016
272 from Aug 08, 2016 When the Biological Clock of Plants Is Disturbed Biologists at Freie Universität Discovered a New Form of Stress in Plants
272 from Aug 08, 2016 When the Biological Clock of Plants Is Disturbed Biologists at Freie Universität Discovered a New Form of Stress in Plants
Biologists at Freie Universität Discovered a New Form of Stress in Plants ' 272/2016 from Aug 08, 2016 Scientists at the Dahlem Center of Plant Sciences (DCPS), Freie Universität, discovered a new form of stress in plants that they have named circadian stress. The findings indicate that it is caused by a change in the day-night rhythm.

Health - Chemistry - 06.08.2016
Rush-hour for neutrophils
LMU researchers have shown that circadian oscillations in the influx of immune cells into the damaged tissue play a crucial role in exacerbating the effects of an acute heart attack in the early morning hours. The extent of the inflammatory reaction triggered by an acute heart attack, and of the resulting damage to the heart muscle, varies depending on the time of day at which the infarct occurs.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.08.2016
A Protective Cap for Bacterial RNA
A Protective Cap for Bacterial RNA
For the first time, researchers from Heidelberg University have deciphered the function of the so-called decapping enzyme in bacteria. These molecular helpers remove the protective cap at the start of ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules. This decapping destabilises the ribonucleic acid, thus allowing degradation to begin in the cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.07.2016
An image is worth a thousand words?
An image is worth a thousand words?
Research news Modern imaging methods greatly exceed the possibilities of X-rays. Vasilis Ntziachristos holds the Chair of Biological Imaging at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and is Director of the Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging at the Helmholtz Centre in Munich. In this , he talks about the fascination of imaging techniques and about finding a common language for engineers and doctors.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.07.2016
A look beneath the skin
A look beneath the skin
Research news Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualization of oxygen in tissue. A team led by Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos, Chair for Biological Imaging at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Director of the Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging at the Helmholtz Centre in Munich , has developed a new approach to this task.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.07.2016
Water-resistant thanks to a biofilm
Water-resistant thanks to a biofilm
Research news Moisture can destroy mortar over time - for example when cracks form as a result of frost. A team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has found an unusual way to protect mortar from moisture: When the material is being mixed, they add a biofilm - a soft, moist substance produced by bacteria.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.07.2016
The final straw for the immune system
The final straw for the immune system
Research news About one-third of the fatal cases of liver cirrhosis are attributable to bacterial infections. The damage to the liver cells not only impedes the function of the organ but also weakens the immune response. Scientist at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Bonn have now found out the reason for incapacitation of the immune system.

Health - 20.07.2016
Breastfeeding alters maternal metabolism
Research news An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has studied the metabolism of women with gestational diabetes after giving birth. Along with partners at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), they were able to show that breastfeeding for more than three months brings about long-term metabolic changes.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.07.2016
The key to self-destruction
The key to self-destruction
Research news When adults develop blood cancer, they are frequently diagnosed with what is referred to as acute myeloid leukemia. The disease is triggered by pathological alterations of bone marrow cells, in which, in addition, an important mechanism is out of action: these cells do not die when they are damaged.

Health - Physics - 13.07.2016
Gamma probe guides surgeons
Gamma probe guides surgeons
Research news Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in men. Even after surgical removal of the prostate gland, there is still a possibility of new metastases forming in lymph nodes in the pelvis. Researchers from the School of Medicine and the Department of Chemistry at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have teamed up to develop a method to visualize and remove these metastases while they are still very small.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.07.2016
Two Kinds of Beta Cells
Two Kinds of Beta Cells
Research news The marker Flattop subdivides the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas into those that maintain glucose metabolism and into immature cells that divide more frequently and adapt to metabolic changes. This could provide a starting point for regenerative diabetes therapies, as scientists of the Technical University of Munich (TUM), in collaboration with colleagues of Helmholtz Zentrum München and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), report in the journal 'Nature'.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 12.07.2016
Nutrition at the heart of medical research
Nutrition at the heart of medical research
Campus news The Else Kröner Fresenius Center for Nutritional Medicine (EKFZ), which has been part of the Technical University of Munich for the past ten years, has played a major role in transforming nutritional sciences in Germany: the combination of the bio-scientific discipline with medicine was a trailblazing approach in the German university landscape in the year the Center was founded.

Environment - Health - 12.07.2016
To get more crop per drop
To get more crop per drop
Research news Boosting food production with limited water availability is of great importance to humanity. However, our current water usage is already unsustainable today. The fact that plant leaves lose a great deal of water through photosynthesis is the greatest limiting factor for larger harvests worldwide.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 28.06.2016
Fish oil during pregnancy offers no protection for offspring against obesity
Research news In Europe, almost one in three schoolchildren under the age of ten is overweight, if not obese. In the search for the cause of this phenomenon, fetal programming inside a mother's womb was put under scrutiny as a potential culprit for this "heavy issue".