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Mathematics - 11.11.2016
Mathematical algorithms calculate social behavior
Mathematical algorithms calculate social behavior
Research news For a long time, mathematical modelling of social systems and dynamics was considered in the realm of science fiction. But predicting, and at once influencing human behavior is well on its way to becoming reality. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are currently developing the appropriate tools.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 10.11.2016
When Nerve Cells Detect Patterns for Acquired Knowledge
When Nerve Cells Detect Patterns for Acquired Knowledge
For observations based on sensory data, the human brain must constantly verify which "version" of reality underlies the perception. The answer is gleaned from probability distributions that are stored in the nerve cell network itself. The neurons are able to detect patterns that reflect acquired knowledge.

Mathematics - 23.05.2016
New Research Training Group in the Field of Asymptotic Geometry
A new Research Training Group (RTG) comprised of mathematicians from Heidelberg University and the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology will be exploring special questions in the field of geometry. Following a successful international expert evaluation, the German Research Foundation (DFG) has awarded the "Asymptotic Invariants and Limits of Groups and Spaces" RTG funding in the amount of approximately four million euros for a period of four and a half years.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 18.04.2016
Predicting Cell Behaviour with a Mathematical Model
Predicting Cell Behaviour with a Mathematical Model
Scientists from Heidelberg University have developed a novel mathematical model to explore cellular processes: with the corresponding software, they now are able to simulate how large collections of cells behave on given geometrical structures. The software supports the evaluation of microscope-based observations of cell behaviour on micropatterned substrates.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 22.02.2016
Why the brain is not folded like a crumpled sheet of paper
Why the brain is not folded like a crumpled sheet of paper
Crumpled paper and Romanesco cauliflower have one thing in common: they have a fractal form. "Scientists have long been discussing whether the curves of our cerebrum have a fractal form," explains Dr. Marc de Lussanet, a researcher at Münster University. Experts want to know how the brain folds are produced in order to understand the brain, its development and possible disorders.

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