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Results 21 - 40 of 177.


Social Sciences - Health - 24.10.2016
Reacting to the tell-tale signs
Reacting to the tell-tale signs
Can search engines save lives? LMU researchers are working on an approach which would enable search engines to more effectively identify users who are at risk of suicide and provide them with information on where to find help. Search engine queries not only reveal a lot about the user's interests and predilections, they also contain information relating to their mood or state of health.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.10.2016
How Does Friendly Fire Happen in the Pancreas?
How Does Friendly Fire Happen in the Pancreas?
Research news In type 1 diabetes, the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells. Scientists at Technical University of Munich (TUM), at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the German Center for Diabetes Research have now reported in the journal ‘PNAS' about a mechanism used by the immune system to prepare for this attack.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.10.2016
Genes on the rack
Genes on the rack
Physicists at LMU have developed a novel nanotool that provides a facile means of characterizing the mechanical properties of biomolecules. Faced with the thousands of proteins and genes found in virtually every cell in the body, biologists want to know how they all work exactly: How do they interact to carry out their specific functions and how do they respond and adapt to perturbations? One of the crucial factors in all of these processes is the question of how biomolecules react to the minuscule forces that operate at the molecular level.

Health - Chemistry - 20.10.2016
One molecule, many targets
One molecule, many targets
Research news Imiquimod is a medication successfully used in the treatment of skin diseases. In addition to its known mechanism of action, it also triggers other processes in the body. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in explaining the molecular fundamentals of these additional effects.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.10.2016
The key to pathogenicity
The key to pathogenicity
LMU researchers have identified a pair of interacting molecules which play a critical role in the pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori. H. pylori infections can cause peptic ulcers and are associated with stomach cancer. The rod-shaped bacterium Helicobacter pylori colonizes the surface of the cells that make up the lining of the stomach, and can cause gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.10.2016
A dangerous bond
A dangerous bond
Research news Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium that can colonize the human stomach - sometimes with fatal consequences. A research group led by Prof. Markus Gerhard of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Bernhard B. Singer of the Institute for Anatomy at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Duisburg-Essen has discovered a completely new approach to preventing or treating infections with this bacterium as well as secondary complications.

Environment - 13.10.2016
Forest Management Yields Higher Productivity through Biodiversity
Forest Management Yields Higher Productivity through Biodiversity
Research news Scientists have conducted the first worldwide study of biodiversity and its impact on the productivity of forests. Data from more than 770,000 observation points from 44 countries were evaluated for this purpose. The samples included in the study comprised 8,700 species of trees from mangroves to trees in tropical rainforests, Central Europe, tundras, and dry savannas to populations in Mediterranean forests.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.10.2016
Watching the brain in action
Watching the brain in action
Research news Watching millions of neurons in the brain interact with each another is the ultimate dream of neuroscientists. A new imaging method now makes it possible to observe the activation of large neural circuits, currently up to the size of a small-animal brain, in real time and three dimensions.

Chemistry - 13.10.2016
X-ray vision reveals how polymer solar cells wear out
X-ray vision reveals how polymer solar cells wear out
Research news Scientists from Technical University of Munich have used the accurate x-ray vision provided by DESY's radiation source PETRA III to observe the degradation of polymer solar cells. Their study suggests an approach for improving the manufacturing process to increase the long-term stability of such organic solar cells.

Physics - Electroengineering - 10.10.2016
Quasiparticles in time-lapse
Quasiparticles in time-lapse
Research news When an electron moves in solid matter, it polarizes its environment. Detailed insight into the interactions between electrons and their environment is the key to better performing future electronics components. However, since these processes transpire within only a few attoseconds, in the past they were practically impossible to investigate.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.10.2016
Big data processing enables worldwide bacterial analysis
Big data processing enables worldwide bacterial analysis
Research news Sequencing data from biological samples such as the skin, intestinal tissues, or soil and water are usually archived in public databases. This allows researchers from all over the globe to access them. However, this has led to the creation of extremely large quantities of data. To be able to explore all these data, new evaluation methods are necessary.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.09.2016
Children who keep HIV in check
Children who keep HIV in check
Some HIV-infected - and untreated - children do not develop AIDS. A new study shows that they control the virus in a different way from the few infected adults who remain disease-free, and sheds light on the reasons for this difference. Children who are HIV-positive but remain free of AIDS are very rare.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.09.2016
A niche for metastases
A niche for metastases
Research news Pancreatic cancer is an exceptionally aggressive type of cancer. Frequently, metastases already start to grow in other organs, particularly often in the liver, before the original tumor was even detected. Scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered a molecular mechanism, which is responsible for the prominent susceptibility of the liver to metastases at such an early stage.

Physics - Electroengineering - 27.09.2016
First quantum photonic circuit with electrically driven light source
First quantum photonic circuit with electrically driven light source
Optical quantum computers are what people are pinning their hopes on for tomorrow's computer technology - whether for tap-proof data encryption, ultrafast calculations involving enormous quantities of data or so-called quantum simulation, which allows highly complex systems to be reproduced on the computer.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.09.2016
Defying frost and the cold with hormones
Defying frost and the cold with hormones
Research news Plants cannot simply relocate to better surroundings when their environmental conditions are no longer suitable. Instead, they have developed sophisticated molecular adaptation mechanisms. Scientists at the Technical University Munich (TUM) in cooperation with the Helmholtz Center Munich and the University of Nottingham have been able to demonstrate that brassinosteroids, which until now have mainly been regarded as growth hormones, increase the resistance of plants against frost.

Health - Chemistry - 26.09.2016
Molecular Stew Analysis Produces World´s First Description of Amyloid Intermediate Structures
Molecular Stew Analysis Produces World´s First Description of Amyloid Intermediate Structures
Scientists of Freie Universität and Max Planck Society succeed in world´s first structural analysis of aggregates believed to be cause of Alzheimer´s disease ‘ 315/2016 from Sep 26, 2016 Scientists of Freie Universität Berlin und the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society made a major step forward in analyzing the biochemical causes of Alzheimer´s and Parkinson´s disease.

Health - Chemistry - 26.09.2016
315 from Sep 26, 2016 Molecular Stew Analysis produces World´s first Description of Amyloid Intermediate Structures Scientists of Freie Universität and Max Planck Society succeed in world´s first structural analysis of aggregates believed to be cause of Alzheimer´s disease
315 from Sep 26, 2016 Molecular Stew Analysis produces World´s first Description of Amyloid Intermediate Structures Scientists of Freie Universität and Max Planck Society succeed in world´s first structural analysis of aggregates believed to be cause of Alzheimer´s disease
Scientists of Freie Universität and Max Planck Society succeed in world´s first structural analysis of aggregates believed to be cause of Alzheimer´s disease ‘ 315/2016 from Sep 26, 2016 Scientists of Freie Universität Berlin und the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society made a major step forward in analyzing the biochemical causes of Alzheimer´s and Parkinson´s disease.

Computer Science - Electroengineering - 22.09.2016
Emotional Machines: Research Project on Interaction between People and Robots
Japanese Studies Scholar Elena Giannoulis Receives ERC Starting Grant for Project on Technological Transformation of Intimacy in Japan ‘ 311/2016 from Sep 22, 2016 Elena Giannoulis, a junior professor of Japanese studies at Freie Universität Berlin, is receiving a Starting Grant amounting to 1.5 million euros over five years from the European Research Council (ERC) to investigate human-robot interaction.

Computer Science - Electroengineering - 22.09.2016
311 from Sep 22, 2016 Emotional Machines: Research Project on Interaction between People and Robots Japanese Studies Scholar Elena Giannoulis Receives ERC Starting Grant for Project on Technological Transformation of Intimacy in Japan
Japanese Studies Scholar Elena Giannoulis Receives ERC Starting Grant for Project on Technological Transformation of Intimacy in Japan ‘ 311/2016 from Sep 22, 2016 Elena Giannoulis, a junior professor of Japanese studies at Freie Universität Berlin, is receiving a Starting Grant amounting to 1.5 million euros over five years from the European Research Council (ERC) to investigate human-robot interaction.

Astronomy / Space Science - 19.09.2016
Earth contains more dust from red giant stars than primitive meteorites
Earth contains more dust from red giant stars than primitive meteorites
All objects in our solar system are build from matter synthesized in previous generations of stars. Using high-precision isotope measurements of neodymium and samarium, scientists from Münster (Germany), Chicago and Livermore (USA) have now found that Earth contains more material from red giant stars than primitive meteorites (chondrites) located in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

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