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Results 1 - 12 of 12.


Physics - Environment - 22.12.2015
New Device Measures Nitrogen Dioxides In Exhaust from Preceding Vehicle
New Device Measures Nitrogen Dioxides In Exhaust from Preceding Vehicle
Depending on its age, condition and even engine, how much does an individual vehicle pollute the urban air? Researchers from Heidelberg University are looking into the matter. The team led by environmental physicist Dr. Denis Pöhler has developed an innovative device that can measure nitrogen dioxides in the exhaust of the preceding vehicle.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 17.12.2015
The Landscape Remembers
New Findings by Earth Scientists from Potsdam and Berlin Published in Science Earth scientists Dr. Wolfgang Schwanghart and Prof. Oliver Korup, PhD, from the Natural Hazards Group at the University of Potsdam investigate extreme events in the Earth's recent history. In a study recently published in the science journal Science, Schwanghart and Korup were part of an international team who investigated thick deposits in the Pokhara valley in the Himalayan country Nepal.

Environment - 30.11.2015
Waters are more polluted than tests say
Waters are more polluted than tests say
Bodies of water are "sinks", and thereby bind contaminants particularly well. If even slightly toxic concentrations in water are to be detected, the growth and swimming behavior of small crustaceans, mini-snails and copepods should be used for ecotoxicological assessments. This was the conclusion of a scientist from the TUM, who carried out a number of studies on the subject in cooperation with the University of California in Davis.

Chemistry - Environment - 27.11.2015
Largest continuous ecosystem on earth has undergone major shifts
Study finds that changes in the composition of phytoplankton community of North Pacific Subtropical Gyre relate to large-scale regional climate phenomena [Deutsche Version folgt in Kürze] It is unparalleled: the subtropical North Pacific Ocean has recently gone through a change of plankton regime that enhances nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterial production.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.10.2015
University researchers highly cited worldwide
University researchers highly cited worldwide
10/27/2015 Three professors from Würzburg University have been commended as "highly cited researchers". Thomas Reuters awards this title to researchers whose work receives exceptional attention worldwide and is highly cited by scientists. Professor Laurens Molenkamp is "Citation Laureate". Professor Jörg Vogel and Professor Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter have been newly added to the list that was updated on 30 October 2015 to join Professor Frank Würthner, who has been on the list since 2014.

Environment - 23.10.2015
Is Climate Change Responsible for More Salt in the North Atlantic?
Is Climate Change Responsible for More Salt in the North Atlantic?
Heidelberg researchers studied the dynamics of the Mediterranean outflow through the Straits of Gibraltar - impact on global ocean circulation As a result of global warming, more extremely salty water masses from the Mediterranean will be flowing into the North Atlantic through the Straits of Gibraltar.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.10.2015
Plant flowering time now predictable
Plant flowering time now predictable
Plants adapt their flowering time to the temperature in their surroundings. But what exactly triggers their flowering at the molecular level? Can this factor switch flowering on or off and thus respond to changes in the climate? In a study currently published in PLOS Genetics, a team headed by Professor Claus Schwechheimer from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a molecular mechanism with which plants adapt their flowering time to ambient temperatures and thereby indicate ways in which the flowering time can be predicted on the basis of genetic information.

Environment - 29.09.2015
Broadleaf trees show reduced sensitivity to global warming
Broadleaf trees show reduced sensitivity to global warming
The sensitivity of leaf unfolding phenology to climate warming has significantly declined since 1980s, according to a study recently published by an international collaboration of scientists. Earlier spring leaf unfolding is a frequently observed response of plants to climate warming. Many deciduous tree species require cold temperatures, in other words 'chilling', for dormancy release, and the warming-related reductions in chilling may counteract the advance of leaf unfolding in response to warming.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 14.09.2015
Disapperance of a Lake
Disapperance of a Lake
Freie Universität Berlin Receives Grants from German Research Foundation for Earth Science Project in Botswana Earth scientists Frank Riedel and Dr. Kai Hartmann from Freie Universität are studying environmental and climate changes over the past millennia in Tsodilo Hills, Botswana, which has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2001.

Event - Environment - 21.07.2015
Communication Scholar W. Lance Bennett Receives Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation
Specialist in Political Communication Doing Research at Institute of Media and Communication Studies at Freie Universität until December 2015 The internationally recognized political scientist and communication scholar, W. Lance Bennett from the University of Washington in Seattle (Washington, USA) is the recipient of a Research Award from the Humboldt Foundation.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 10.06.2015
Marine Expedition to Brazil Investigates Climate Dynamics
Marine Expedition to Brazil Investigates Climate Dynamics
An international team led by Heidelberg University geoscientists will embark on a four-week marine expedition in the Tropical West Atlantic in the spring of 2016 to study historical precipitation changes in Brazil. In March and April of next year, the researchers are planning to collect water and sediment samples along the Brazilian coast and reconstruct the changes in the local precipitation over the past 150,000 years.

Environment - Life Sciences - 07.04.2015
Small Differences, Big Effect
Small Differences, Big Effect
New Findings: Variability Helps Mammals to Become Invasive From the time humans began discovering and conquering new continents, they also started transporting animals and plants around the world and releasing them in locations where they had never been before. Most of these alien species died out quickly, but many established populations and some even multiplied and became invasive, causing tremendous economic and environmental harm.

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