news 2015


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Results 41 - 60 of 99.


Life Sciences - Health - 22.10.2015
Alzheimer's disease: Plaques impair memory formation during sleep
Alzheimer’s disease: Plaques impair memory formation during sleep
Alzheimer's patients frequently suffer from sleep disorders, mostly even before they become forgetful. Furthermore, it is known that sleep plays a very important role in memory formation. Researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now been able to show for the first time how the pathological changes in the brain act on the information-storing processes during sleep.

Physics - 14.10.2015
Playing billiard with hybrid light and matter particles
Playing billiard with hybrid light and matter particles
10/14/2015 For the first time, physicists from the University of Würzburg have successfully modelled and studied a particularly chaotic system in quantum nature. The experiment starts from the principle of a classic billiard table. An international team of physicists created a kind of miniature pool table where the balls are replaced by quantum particles.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.10.2015
New field of application for versatile helper
New field of application for versatile helper
In Alzheimer's disease proteins clump together to long fibrils causing the death of nerve cells. Small heat shock proteins can counteract this effect. Scientists, therefore, hope to deploy them as agents in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Using the example of a small heat shock protein, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have now uncovered how the protein interacts with other proteins.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.10.2015
Jamming the signal
LMU researchers have developed a short peptide that inhibits the activation of a signal pathway in monocytes that enables monocytes to adhere stick to endothelial cells and penetrate sites of acute inflammation. The image depicts the binding of the SKY peptide to CCL5 (green), which inhibits docking of HNP1 and thus prevents the formation of the HNP1-CCL5 heteromer.

Mathematics - Event - 12.10.2015
Award for Paper on Simulation of Flow Processes
With one of the highest possible awards in the field of applied mathematics the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) has honoured the authors of a paper on computer-supported simulation of flow processes that appeared last year in one of the society's five journals. Among the SIAM publications the Heidelberg paper was chosen as the one with outstanding research results of special overall significance.

Chemistry - Physics - 08.10.2015
Faster design - better catalysts
Faster design - better catalysts
While the cleaning of car exhausts is among the best known applications of catalytic processes, it is only the tip of the iceberg. Practically the entire chemical industry relies on catalytic reactions. Catalyst design plays a key role in improving these processes. An international team of scientists has now developed a concept that elegantly correlates geometric and adsorption properties.

Physics - 07.10.2015
The virtual pedestrian
The virtual pedestrian
Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are designed to identify traffic hazards. But to assess the behavior of other road users, these systems need detailed data. That is why researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a pedestrian simulator that con be linked with other virtual worlds, enabling reconstruction of critical scenarios without exposing participants to danger.

Life Sciences - 05.10.2015
Protein of everlasting youth
Protein of everlasting youth
Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum Munich and the Technical University of Munich working in collaboration with colleagues at ETH Zurich have discovered that variations in the NANOG expression of embryonic stem cells are not necessarily linked to differences in the expression of other pluripotency factors.

Chemistry - 02.10.2015
First-aid for defective mucus
In our mouths, stomachs and eyes, mucus forms a protective layer that prevents friction and keeps foreign bodies out. The main components of mucus are mucins, which bind water molecules. However, if these mucins are damaged, they can lose this ability. A team of researchers, headed by Professor Oliver Lieleg at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has now found a way to repair defective mucins.

Health - Chemistry - 01.10.2015
Cell marker enables prognosis about the course of infections
Cell marker enables prognosis about the course of infections
When a pathogen invades the body, specific cells in the human immune system are ready to take immediate action in order to destroy it. The molecular characteristics of these killer cells were unknown until recently. Now, for the first time, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has managed to create a molecular profile of the protective cells.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 01.10.2015
The Carbohydrate Wind Tunnel
The Carbohydrate Wind Tunnel
"Nature" Reports on Powerful Carbohydrate Analytics for Sequencing and Quality Control / WITH PRESS PHOTOS A team of researchers from Berlin succeeded in an effort to fundamentally improve carbohydrate analysis. With the new method, developed by Prof. Kevin Pagel (Freie Universität Berlin and Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society) and Prof. Peter Seeberger (Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces and Freie Universität Berlin), complex glycans, building blocks of life such as DNA and proteins, can now be sequenced.

Chemistry - Physics - 30.09.2015
Hydrogen for all seasons
LMU chemists have developed novel porous materials called "covalent organic frameworks", which provide a basis for the design of polymeric photocatalysts with tunable physical, chemical and electronic properties. Chemical systems that are capable of generating hydrogen gas by light-activated scission of water molecules (often termed artificial photosynthesis) represent a promising technology for the efficient storage of solar energy.

Environment - 29.09.2015
Broadleaf trees show reduced sensitivity to global warming
Broadleaf trees show reduced sensitivity to global warming
The sensitivity of leaf unfolding phenology to climate warming has significantly declined since 1980s, according to a study recently published by an international collaboration of scientists. Earlier spring leaf unfolding is a frequently observed response of plants to climate warming. Many deciduous tree species require cold temperatures, in other words 'chilling', for dormancy release, and the warming-related reductions in chilling may counteract the advance of leaf unfolding in response to warming.

Earth Sciences - 28.09.2015
Countdown to eruption
How long is the interval between the trigger for a volcanic eruption and the eruption itself? A new study by LMU volcanologists indicates that compositional variations in erupted Magmas can answer this question. In the lithosphere beneath an active volcano the magma is never at rest. When melts with different chemical compositions come into, the result is often an explosive mixture: the molten rock begins to bubble, and an eruption becomes inevitable.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 28.09.2015
Tweaking proteins with ’Tub-tag’
LMU researchers, together with colleagues based in Berlin, have developed a rapid and efficient technique for targeted chemoenzymatic functionalization of proteins. The new method has a wide range of potential therapeutic applications. Selective intermolecular recognition is at the heart of all biological processes.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.09.2015
25 million euros for multiple sclerosis research
25 million euros for multiple sclerosis research
As one of the central fields of medical research at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), neuroscience is to gain a new research center for multiple sclerosis (MS). In Germany alone, some 200,000 people are affected by this as yet incurable disease, the cause of which remains unknown. Researchers at the TUM Klinikum rechts der Isar will now focus on MS and link clinical aspects of the disease with basic research.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.09.2015
Pancreatic cancer: TUM researchers develop a new therapy concept
Pancreatic cancer: TUM researchers develop a new therapy concept
Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer and one of the most difficult to treat. Its high resistance to treatment is a major problem, particularly in the advanced stages. Researchers at Klinikum rechts der Isar University Hospital of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have joined forces with a team from Stanford University to investigate a conceptually new approach to therapy which primarily takes epigenetic mechanisms into consideration.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.09.2015
Promising results with inhibitors of amyloid formation
When proteins change their structure and clump together, formation of amyloid fibrils and plaques may occur. Such "misfolding" and "protein aggregation" processes damage cells and cause diseases such as Alzheimer's and type 2 diabetes. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) headed by Professor Aphrodite Kapurniotu have now developed molecules that suppress protein aggregation and could pave the way for new treatments to combat Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes and other cell-degenerative diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.09.2015
Ringing in the ears and chronic pain enter by the same gate
Ringing in the ears and chronic pain enter by the same gate
Tinnitus and chronic pain have more in common than their ability to afflict millions with the very real experience of "phantom" sensations. Scientists noted similarities between the two disorders more than thirty years ago. Now advances in brain imaging and associated techniques have enabled researchers to begin homing in on their structural and functional bases, revealing what appears to be a central gatekeeping system implicated in both chronic pain and tinnitus.

Physics - Chemistry - 22.09.2015
Laser-based molecular fingerprinting
A team of researchers based at LMU and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics has developed an infrared laser that can be used to identify and quantify molecules in complex mixtures with high specificity and sensitivity. The new laser system developed at LMU emits ultrashort pulses of infrared light at a repetition rate of 100 million per second.

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